Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by section 2 prep)
    absolutley astounding.

    how long did it take to work that out - be honest?

    ALL of the CO, is used in step 3. so 56Grams of it

    Very good logic tbh, very good

    so tell me, if it was a 3:2 ratio...how would you go about that?

    56grams = 28 2

    3:2 ratio

    (12+32) x 2/1.5 = mass of Co2?

    see, when i read it, i completely got blitzed. I did not use logic - but even so, it is very good that you saw that...good find imo
    Same time as the other question?

    And if it was a 3:2 ratio, then you would just do (2/3) x 2 x (12+32) to get the mass of CO2.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Thanks

    (Original post by Nator)
    You know the issue with the prices of these right? :rolleyes:

    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Kaplan-BMAT-Bi...#ht_500wt_1156

    Most people say it's not worth it though.
    WHAT!!???? BLOODY MADNESS!!
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by section 2 prep)
    http://www.admissionstests.cambridge...ion_2_2010.pdf

    What about number 12? ^_^
    Done
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JChoudhry)
    WHAT!!???? BLOODY MADNESS!!
    Ikr :rolleyes:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Nator)
    Same time as the other question?

    And if it was a 3:2 ratio, then you would just do (2/3) x 2 x (12+32) to get the mass of CO2.
    spot on, i mixed up my thoughts lol

    all you need to know is TWO moles are used.

    and then, look at the ratio seperately, to work out the mass

    how did you know you had to do this?

    ^_^ also

    http://www.admissionstests.cambridge...ion_2_2010.pdf

    can you do Q12?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by section 2 prep)
    spot on, i mixed up my thoughts lol

    all you need to know is TWO moles are used.

    and then, look at the ratio seperately, to work out the mass

    how did you know you had to do this?

    ^_^ also

    http://www.admissionstests.cambridge...ion_2_2010.pdf

    can you do Q12?
    I done it! xD Read above!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Nator)
    Just done it and got C, sorry if I'm wrong but rushed it.

    (1080 + PT) / (20 + P) = 56
    1080 + PT = 56 (20 + P)
    1080 + PT = 1120 + 56P
    PT = 40 + 56P
    PT - 56P = 40
    P (T - 56) = 40
    P = 40 / (T-56) = C.
    just wow

    right answer, spot on, no idea how you can do these

    but i didn't understand what the question is asking/your working

    you're spot on, it's just me

    could you explain please?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by section 2 prep)
    just wow

    right answer, spot on, no idea how you can do these

    but i didn't understand what the question is asking/your working

    you're spot on, it's just me

    could you explain please?
    It's hard to explain but I can try:

    You know the combined mean time is 56, so to do this, you must add the total of all the times, and divide it by the number of people (like a normal average).

    So as the mean of the first group is 54, do 54 x 20 = 1080 (it's their total times), and you need to add this to PT, which is the total for the second group, and divide all of this by 20 + P, which is the total number of people, and this all equals 56. Tadaa. Now the rest is just algebra Anyways I'm off working for a bit now
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Nator)
    It's hard to explain but I can try:

    You know the combined mean time is 56, so to do this, you must add the total of all the times, and divide it by the number of people (like a normal average).

    So as the mean of the first group is 54, do 54 x 20 = 1080 (it's their total times), and you need to add this to PT, which is the total for the second group, and divide all of this by 20 + P, which is the total number of people, and this all equals 56. Tadaa. Now the rest is just algebra Anyways I'm off working for a bit now
    how do you figure these out?

    can you tell me what books you use to practise, what sites, brain training?

    i get it now
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Quackers93)
    Are you on waiting lists for any cause you might be able to get in that way? Or just try ringing them up on the day once you've got your results, thats what I'm gonna do. Its very unlikely, but who knows
    Yes, that does sound like a good idea, do uni's tell you if you are on the waiting list? (I hope not! )
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by *WiNdOw LiCkEr*)
    Yes, that does sound like a good idea, do uni's tell you if you are on the waiting list? (I hope not! )

    (Original post by *WiNdOw LiCkEr*)
    Yes, that does sound like a good idea, do uni's tell you if you are on the waiting list? (I hope not! )
    How'd the app's go?

    is there any advise you'll like to give us?

    PS: as medicine is so competitive and many good candidates are rejected - what can you learn ?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by loz876)
    yeahh I want to go to Canada what about you?
    hey i dont know.. i m still researching into it... have u thought of any particular univ there.. n how r u goin to get the funds ?
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    what about the isc one or the official one?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Here's some advice on how to become a "hopeful entrant", because most of you seem like you will be rejected.

    1st, dropping an AS in your first year will not improve your chances at medical school, (Although many students do it) and therefore is not recommended. What I would recommend is, continue your fourth AS to A2, or if you want to drop it, then choose a different AS as it gives you a broader depth of knowledge. Subjects I would drop at AS is Biology, or any other subject apart from Chemistry. I say Biology because A2 Biology is usually to do with plants and animals, and most universities won't be that fussed about Biology at A2. I also recommend you take the Extended Project and do really well in it as it equips you very well for university, and is highly valued by every university. Apart from the normal A levels (Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths), I recommend you take at least one of the following subjects at AS at least as your 3rd or 4th A level, or as an extra AS in your second year, Psychology, Philosophy, Anthropology, English Language, Law or Foreign/Modern Languages. The reason I say this is because, these are academically rigorous subjects and all have applications to medicine that are sometimes not a part of some medical degrees. Therefore, it is good to have an idea in these subjects. Plus, university is all about being academic, regardless of what degree you do, so you need to show them that you can handle such high level of study, especially medicine!

    2nd, work experience is very important. If you don't have a good amount of work experience, don't bother applying because you WILL get rejected, that is how fierce the competition is. You should have done at least 2 different types of work experience totalling up to at least 20 days. Work experience does not have to be medical related, but has to be in some form of caring or communicating role. This can include anything relating to: Hospitals, Clinics, Care Homes, Rehab Centres, Retail Stores, Restaurants, Fundraising, Surveying, Public Events and many others. Voluntary work is much more better than doing a one week work placement or getting a part-time job, as it shows your enthusiasm, commitment and ambition to want to help people. That doesn't mean, if you get a job offer or work placement offer you don't do it, you still should do it, as you need all the help you can get to face the competition of medical school. Also, make sure your work experiences are a major part of your statements, along with stating exactly what you LEARNT from it, not just "I worked here and help a man" but rather, "I worked at so-and-so and gave support to a patient with so-and-so disorder. It gave me valuable experience, as I began to learn how such people live, cope and deal with their situations and problems, and how I can possibly be a major part of their life by improving their health by doing so-and-so" etc something like that.

    3rd, early application along with a very strong statement, and a really good reference from your personal tutor. The slightest flaw can destroy all of your chances. Stay on your tutors GOOD side, keep an excellent attendance and always work hard and hand in homework/coursework etc well before it is due.

    4th, if you here about any events that will be running by any universities, colleges or any other insitution that is science or healthcare related, do your best to try and attend these, as you could learn so much.

    5th, don't put yourself down if you think you can't study medicine because you don't have enough GCSE's. Most universities don't really bother with them because they expect students to already have them, and your A levels can compensate for them. Even if you can't study A levels, and you end up on a BTEC, there is still a chance, as long as you have A level chemistry at grade A and your BTEC is all Distinction work. Yes! BTEC applicants DO get into medical school, although it is rare. This also goes for people studying other qualifications, as long as you have A level chemistry, and the amount of study you do is equivalent to 3 A levels, then you stand a chance! But to be honest, out of all the different types of students, the type of students that have the best chance are the IB students. Because they do so much more than A level students.

    6th, being cleverer doesn't improve your chances of medical school. It is all about commitment. Do you want to be spending the rest of your life studying? Don't consider medicine as a science, consider it as your life. Science is about discoveries. Medicine is about saving lives, treating people and improving health care. Every single day of your life as a doctor will be different. You will meet different people, with different illnesses. Especially ones that you may not have heard of before, which is where the studying comes in. Some specialties, it takes at least 13 years to fully qualify. You need to consider whether you are prepared for that. There is no quick or easy way into medicine, and being JUST clever will kill your chances, as this shows universities you're big headed.

    And finally, remember that, Medicine is not a course where you attend lectures and sit exams, it is a vocational course. Without practical experience (Work exp), backed up with highly academic ability (Strong grades) you are most likely not to get in. For every seat, there are 8-30 applicants (Depending on university). On top of this, you get a lot of graduates that apply, and you can't compete with people that already have degrees! That's why, you need to show that, regardless of if someone has a higher qualification than you, you can be a better doctor than they can ever dream of. Hopes this helps everyone, and good luck for everyone applying to medical school. Any questions, just ask away, either on here or message me.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by section 2 prep)
    How'd the app's go?

    is there any advise you'll like to give us?

    PS: as medicine is so competitive and many good candidates are rejected - what can you learn ?
    (Original post by section 2 prep)
    How'd the app's go?

    is there any advise you'll like to give us?

    PS: as medicine is so competitive and many good candidates are rejected - what can you learn ?
    Well my application was good enough to get interviews.....probably the largest hurdle but fell apart slightly at interview.
    Thinking about it now, the whole year was a total nightmare, probably the worst year of my life.
    Waiting for replies from unis is horrible. I didn't hear back from my final one until mid april after applying a week before october 15th. After I got my last rejection I was actually pretty relieved to have final decisions from all of them. It was so stressful and demoralising getting rejections whilst your friends are all getting offers and interviews (not for medicine). So that is something I hopefully won't do this application. Also I had my UCL interview a few weeks before my Bristol one and I thought it had gone really well and so was quite shocked to get the rejection just before bristol so I didn't really go into the Bristol interview with the proper mindset (was quite depressed for the majority of the application cycle over other stuff and the rejections and waiting just contributed to it).
    Also my school just decided to do my A2 mocks at the same time as my interviews so obviously just worked for my interviews. Consequently I got UUC which didn't go down well with my teachers who *****ed at me for weeks on end making everything even worse.

    Heres some feedback I got from UCL:

    "Thank you for your email requesting feedback from your interview at UCL and for your patience while awaiting a response.
    The panel noted that you are clearly academically and intellectually able. However, the interviewers commented that motivation and enthusiasm for medicine were not evident from your interview. They were not persuaded that you have the passion and drive to undertake the medical degree programme and subsequently practise medicine. Although you have undertaken relevant work experience, this did not seem to have inspired you or given you insight into the profession. The interviewers were concerned that you lack a thorough and realistic understanding of what medicine entails."

    I think what they have said is actually very true, I didn't have much motivation at the time (for anything not just medicine) and this obviously shone through :/

    My interview at Bristol didn't go well, they were very hostile with me and there was no dialogue, just them firing questions at me. My ethical question was 'if a mother and child each had equal chances of survival, who would you choose and why"
    I was expecting to be able to bounce ideas off them and have a conversation discussing it but they seemed to just expect insightful bullet point responses. Which after about three got difficult for me.

    Tbh I don't think I deserved to get in based on my interviews as I just lacked motivation and passion. The work experience I had done I didn't actually enjoy for a number of reasons and I tried unsuccessfully to ignore the negatives and convince myself that medicine was for me. Basically I wasn't convinced myself that medicine was really what I wanted to do so I didn't have much of a chance to convince the interviewers!

    Since then I have done some other work experience and voluntary work, I loved it and genrally I'm much more motivated and I am convinced that this is the right choice for me. A levels have gone really well and I'm pretty sure I easily achieved AAA. Hopefully in the gap year I will get some more experience, get a job in something vaguely related and then do some traveling who knows where.

    So my advice to first time applicants:
    1. Are you sure medicine is for you? really really sure?
    2. Don't underestimate the amount of work needed for UKCAT/BMAT. UKCAT need a lot of practice (something I didn't do) I got 640 avg. which isn't really good enough for anywhere but am doing much better this year with a lot of practice. BMAT thankfully was one of the only things that actually went quite well last time
    3. Use the summer before your A levels to really work on your application. Investigate and choose your uni's now and work on your personal statement, don't leave it late!
    4. Don't stress out through the application period, seriously there is no point

    Hope this is somewhat useful!
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AminurRahman)
    Here's some advice on how to become a "hopeful entrant", because most of you seem like you will be rejected.

    1st, dropping an AS in your first year will not improve your chances at medical school, (Although many students do it) and therefore is not recommended. What I would recommend is, continue your fourth AS to A2, or if you want to drop it, then choose a different AS as it gives you a broader depth of knowledge. Subjects I would drop at AS is Biology, or any other subject apart from Chemistry. I say Biology because A2 Biology is usually to do with plants and animals, and most universities won't be that fussed about Biology at A2. I also recommend you take the Extended Project and do really well in it as it equips you very well for university, and is highly valued by every university. Apart from the normal A levels (Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths), I recommend you take at least one of the following subjects at AS at least as your 3rd or 4th A level, or as an extra AS in your second year, Psychology, Philosophy, Anthropology, English Language, Law or Foreign/Modern Languages. The reason I say this is because, these are academically rigorous subjects and all have applications to medicine that are sometimes not a part of some medical degrees. Therefore, it is good to have an idea in these subjects. Plus, university is all about being academic, regardless of what degree you do, so you need to show them that you can handle such high level of study, especially medicine!

    2nd, work experience is very important. If you don't have a good amount of work experience, don't bother applying because you WILL get rejected, that is how fierce the competition is. You should have done at least 2 different types of work experience totalling up to at least 20 days. Work experience does not have to be medical related, but has to be in some form of caring or communicating role. This can include anything relating to: Hospitals, Clinics, Care Homes, Rehab Centres, Retail Stores, Restaurants, Fundraising, Surveying, Public Events and many others. Voluntary work is much more better than doing a one week work placement or getting a part-time job, as it shows your enthusiasm, commitment and ambition to want to help people. That doesn't mean, if you get a job offer or work placement offer you don't do it, you still should do it, as you need all the help you can get to face the competition of medical school. Also, make sure your work experiences are a major part of your statements, along with stating exactly what you LEARNT from it, not just "I worked here and help a man" but rather, "I worked at so-and-so and gave support to a patient with so-and-so disorder. It gave me valuable experience, as I began to learn how such people live, cope and deal with their situations and problems, and how I can possibly be a major part of their life by improving their health by doing so-and-so" etc something like that.

    3rd, early application along with a very strong statement, and a really good reference from your personal tutor. The slightest flaw can destroy all of your chances. Stay on your tutors GOOD side, keep an excellent attendance and always work hard and hand in homework/coursework etc well before it is due.

    4th, if you here about any events that will be running by any universities, colleges or any other insitution that is science or healthcare related, do your best to try and attend these, as you could learn so much.

    5th, don't put yourself down if you think you can't study medicine because you don't have enough GCSE's. Most universities don't really bother with them because they expect students to already have them, and your A levels can compensate for them. Even if you can't study A levels, and you end up on a BTEC, there is still a chance, as long as you have A level chemistry at grade A and your BTEC is all Distinction work. Yes! BTEC applicants DO get into medical school, although it is rare. This also goes for people studying other qualifications, as long as you have A level chemistry, and the amount of study you do is equivalent to 3 A levels, then you stand a chance! But to be honest, out of all the different types of students, the type of students that have the best chance are the IB students. Because they do so much more than A level students.

    6th, being cleverer doesn't improve your chances of medical school. It is all about commitment. Do you want to be spending the rest of your life studying? Don't consider medicine as a science, consider it as your life. Science is about discoveries. Medicine is about saving lives, treating people and improving health care. Every single day of your life as a doctor will be different. You will meet different people, with different illnesses. Especially ones that you may not have heard of before, which is where the studying comes in. Some specialties, it takes at least 13 years to fully qualify. You need to consider whether you are prepared for that. There is no quick or easy way into medicine, and being JUST clever will kill your chances, as this shows universities you're big headed.

    And finally, remember that, Medicine is not a course where you attend lectures and sit exams, it is a vocational course. Without practical experience (Work exp), backed up with highly academic ability (Strong grades) you are most likely not to get in. For every seat, there are 8-30 applicants (Depending on university). On top of this, you get a lot of graduates that apply, and you can't compete with people that already have degrees! That's why, you need to show that, regardless of if someone has a higher qualification than you, you can be a better doctor than they can ever dream of. Hopes this helps everyone, and good luck for everyone applying to medical school. Any questions, just ask away, either on here or message me.
    I must disagree with your point about work experience. There is an individual in my year, a graduate, who had a single day's work experience at a GPs Surgery. Having spoken to my friends I have found that most have 10 days or less of work experience.

    Work experience is good, but you shouldn't be making comments like 'You must have this much...' Or 'You WILL be rejected'. As one of your feedback pieces illustrates, in order to secure an offer you have to reflect on what you learned whilst doing the work experience. The length of time is not necessarily indicative of anything.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Greetings!

    Well, it looks like I'm a little late to the party, but better late than never eh?

    I'm studying Biology, Chemistry, Physics and History (I know, I must be crazy, I'm really beginning to regret not taking Maths...)

    The dream is to go to Oxford but I know that's unlikely! I'm also looking at Imperial, UCL, Manchester, Leicester, Birmingham...If I'm honest I can't believe how quickly this has all come round, this time last year I'd only just finished my GCSEs - everything seems to have got very serious very quickly!

    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by loz876)
    yeahh I want to go to Canada what about you?
    Which canadian medical unis you planning to apply ?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by aqua05)
    Which canadian medical unis you planning to apply ?

    (Original post by *WiNdOw LiCkEr*)
    Yes, that does sound like a good idea, do uni's tell you if you are on the waiting list? (I hope not! )

    Window, your story was very inspirational, i wish you all the luck in the next application!

    May i ask, i have obtained and secured nursing home voluntary, as of next week. I'm really shy! so am scared what on earth they will think of me,
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JChoudhry)
    what about the isc one or the official one?

    (Original post by AminurRahman)
    Here's some advice on how to become a "hopeful entrant", because most of you seem like you will be rejected.

    1st, dropping an AS in your first year will not improve your chances at medical school, (Although many students do it) and therefore is not recommended. What I would recommend is, continue your fourth AS to A2, or if you want to drop it, then choose a different AS as it gives you a broader depth of knowledge. Subjects I would drop at AS is Biology, or any other subject apart from Chemistry. I say Biology because A2 Biology is usually to do with plants and animals, and most universities won't be that fussed about Biology at A2. I also recommend you take the Extended Project and do really well in it as it equips you very well for university, and is highly valued by every university. Apart from the normal A levels (Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths), I recommend you take at least one of the following subjects at AS at least as your 3rd or 4th A level, or as an extra AS in your second year, Psychology, Philosophy, Anthropology, English Language, Law or Foreign/Modern Languages. The reason I say this is because, these are academically rigorous subjects and all have applications to medicine that are sometimes not a part of some medical degrees. Therefore, it is good to have an idea in these subjects. Plus, university is all about being academic, regardless of what degree you do, so you need to show them that you can handle such high level of study, especially medicine!

    2nd, work experience is very important. If you don't have a good amount of work experience, don't bother applying because you WILL get rejected, that is how fierce the competition is. You should have done at least 2 different types of work experience totalling up to at least 20 days. Work experience does not have to be medical related, but has to be in some form of caring or communicating role. This can include anything relating to: Hospitals, Clinics, Care Homes, Rehab Centres, Retail Stores, Restaurants, Fundraising, Surveying, Public Events and many others. Voluntary work is much more better than doing a one week work placement or getting a part-time job, as it shows your enthusiasm, commitment and ambition to want to help people. That doesn't mean, if you get a job offer or work placement offer you don't do it, you still should do it, as you need all the help you can get to face the competition of medical school. Also, make sure your work experiences are a major part of your statements, along with stating exactly what you LEARNT from it, not just "I worked here and help a man" but rather, "I worked at so-and-so and gave support to a patient with so-and-so disorder. It gave me valuable experience, as I began to learn how such people live, cope and deal with their situations and problems, and how I can possibly be a major part of their life by improving their health by doing so-and-so" etc something like that.

    3rd, early application along with a very strong statement, and a really good reference from your personal tutor. The slightest flaw can destroy all of your chances. Stay on your tutors GOOD side, keep an excellent attendance and always work hard and hand in homework/coursework etc well before it is due.

    4th, if you here about any events that will be running by any universities, colleges or any other insitution that is science or healthcare related, do your best to try and attend these, as you could learn so much.

    5th, don't put yourself down if you think you can't study medicine because you don't have enough GCSE's. Most universities don't really bother with them because they expect students to already have them, and your A levels can compensate for them. Even if you can't study A levels, and you end up on a BTEC, there is still a chance, as long as you have A level chemistry at grade A and your BTEC is all Distinction work. Yes! BTEC applicants DO get into medical school, although it is rare. This also goes for people studying other qualifications, as long as you have A level chemistry, and the amount of study you do is equivalent to 3 A levels, then you stand a chance! But to be honest, out of all the different types of students, the type of students that have the best chance are the IB students. Because they do so much more than A level students.

    6th, being cleverer doesn't improve your chances of medical school. It is all about commitment. Do you want to be spending the rest of your life studying? Don't consider medicine as a science, consider it as your life. Science is about discoveries. Medicine is about saving lives, treating people and improving health care. Every single day of your life as a doctor will be different. You will meet different people, with different illnesses. Especially ones that you may not have heard of before, which is where the studying comes in. Some specialties, it takes at least 13 years to fully qualify. You need to consider whether you are prepared for that. There is no quick or easy way into medicine, and being JUST clever will kill your chances, as this shows universities you're big headed.

    And finally, remember that, Medicine is not a course where you attend lectures and sit exams, it is a vocational course. Without practical experience (Work exp), backed up with highly academic ability (Strong grades) you are most likely not to get in. For every seat, there are 8-30 applicants (Depending on university). On top of this, you get a lot of graduates that apply, and you can't compete with people that already have degrees! That's why, you need to show that, regardless of if someone has a higher qualification than you, you can be a better doctor than they can ever dream of. Hopes this helps everyone, and good luck for everyone applying to medical school. Any questions, just ask away, either on here or message me.
    hi guys

    i've got nursing home voluntary, but am quite shy!

    like really shy.
 
 
 
The home of Results and Clearing

3,494

people online now

1,567,000

students helped last year

University open days

  1. Bournemouth University
    Clearing Open Day Undergraduate
    Fri, 17 Aug '18
  2. University of Bolton
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Fri, 17 Aug '18
  3. Bishop Grosseteste University
    All Courses Undergraduate
    Fri, 17 Aug '18
Poll
A-level students - how do you feel about your results?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.