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    Well hello there
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    (Original post by SteveCrain)
    I said: When the patients life is at risk or the patient puts the lives of others at risk, autonomy is to be broken.

    I did not say the patient cannot make choices such as life or death.

    The only thing you can infer from my statement is that I believe if the patient chooses to admit to a doctor that they are planning to end their life, they cannot expect confidentiality.

    Rights have nothing to do with it.
    You said that "autonomy" can be broken which is pretty ambiguous and could be interpreted to mean that the patient would no longer have a say in their treatment if lack of said treatment would result in putting their life at risk.

    I don't understand how rights don't have anything to do with it... if someone shouldn't expect confidentiality then they don't have a right to it. What does it relate to if not rights?
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    (Original post by Circadian_Rhythm)
    Well hello there
    Suuuuup. Enjoying the last year or so of having a normal circadian rhythm? :p:
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    (Original post by Unbiased Opinion)
    Suuuuup. Enjoying the last year or so of having a normal circadian rhythm? :p:
    I am :p:

    To think, September 2012 isn't very far away now...
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    (Original post by Circadian_Rhythm)
    I am :p:

    To think, September 2012 isn't very far away now...
    Then December 2012. :ashamed2:
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    (Original post by Unbiased Opinion)
    Then December 2012. :ashamed2:
    Work for 3 months 22 hours a day ---> Die in a 2010 film
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    (Original post by Circadian_Rhythm)
    Work for 3 months 22 hours a day ---> Die in a 2010 film
    Spend remaining two hours per day boozed up.
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    (Original post by Straight up G)
    I realise that that wasn't the best example, seeing as it was fairly close to your theory. But I pretty much guarantee that what you said is not correct in most cases.
    It is, that's what they use, check on edexcel, they make a straight line from B to A and carry upwards until they get to 100%
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    (Original post by Unbiased Opinion)

    I don't understand how rights don't have anything to do with it... if someone shouldn't expect confidentiality then they don't have a right to it. What does it relate to if not rights?
    It relates to matter of fact and proceedings. Inventing synonyms does not change the meaning. You're essentially, perhaps due to, as you say, my ambiguity, dragging out a none issue; or an issue whose solution could be drawn from my earlier posts if the meanings that are known to be unintended, but could stand due to that ambiguity, are disregarded.
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    (Original post by SteveCrain)
    It relates to matter of fact and proceedings. Inventing synonyms does not change the meaning. You're essentially, perhaps due to, as you say, my ambiguity, dragging out a none issue; or an issue whose solution could be drawn from my earlier posts if the meanings that are known to be unintended, but could stand due to that ambiguity, are disregarded.
    Fact and proceedings, in ethics, stem from rights.

    Then what do you mean? "Autonomy" encompasses so many things, to say that autonomy should be dismissed if a patient's life is at risk is to open a floodgate of meanings.
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    (Original post by Straight up G)
    .
    (Original post by Normandy114)
    .
    (Original post by SteveCrain)
    .

    I love how many perspectives we have on this now.

    GMC guidelines:

    http://www.gmc-uk.org/guidance/ethic...dance/7342.asp

    Dr Rix encourages Mrs Giggs to let him contact social services about Julie's behaviour, but she refuses. He concludes that Mrs Giggs is a competent adult, so he abides by her decision; but he does provide her with information about local charities working with elderly people and leaves her contact details for a support group, encouraging her to contact them.
    So you can't break confidentiality in my outlined situation, according to GMC guidelines, it seems.
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    (Original post by Straight up G)
    I realise that that wasn't the best example, seeing as it was fairly close to your theory. But I pretty much guarantee that what you said is not correct in most cases.
    It is, I checked it. Every maths exam uses that rule and i'm sure it was said in the edexcel website. The only exception is if the grade boundaries are all high e.g., A is 67/75 and a B is 60/75, then 100% will be full marks and 90% will be in between 67 and 75 i.e. 71.
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    (Original post by jam277)
    It is, I checked it. Every maths exam uses that rule and i'm sure it was said in the edexcel website. The only exception is if the grade boundaries are all high e.g., A is 67/75 and a B is 60/75, then 100% will be full marks and 90% will be in between 67 and 75 i.e. 71.
    Well Edexcel is just one exam board, a notoriously poor exam board now
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    (Original post by JoeLatics)
    How much Work Experience has everyone got?

    I'll have been doing Receptions in a Hospice for a just under a year when I apply, and I did 6 evenings in a GP's... will that be enough? (Looking at Oxford & Manchester at the minute!)
    I've done 6 weeks at the NHS baby clinic. A week in a community hospital, and and few days in a midwifery clinic.

    I also have non medical work exp. such as working in a nursery and a Mum's and Tots group (this was done in year 11 when I decided I wanted to work with children but not exactly sure which field.)
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    (Original post by Unbiased Opinion)
    I love how many perspectives we have on this now.

    GMC guidelines:

    http://www.gmc-uk.org/guidance/ethic...dance/7342.asp



    So you can't break confidentiality in my outlined situation, according to GMC guidelines, it seems.
    I was just wondering, do they ask you questions like this in interviews? It seems a bit odd, when we haven't even been taught the course yet - surely they have to teach us this?
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    (Original post by liviaaa)
    I was just wondering, do they ask you questions like this in interviews? It seems a bit odd, when we haven't even been taught the course yet - surely they have to teach us this?
    Tbh, I dunno. I think it's possible that they'd ask us ethical questions but they won't expect us to know GMC guidelines inside out: I think they just want to see our thought processes and see that we have empathy and stuff. But I think it's worth being aware of some ethical stuff (but, like, not yet, I don't think we need to start preparation for interviews for another few months, I just know a bit about medical ethics because we're doing it in RE atm).

    http://www.gmc-uk.org/guidance/case_studies.asp might be useful later on.

    Also the 4 principles of medical ethics:

    beneficence (acting in best interest of patient).
    Non-malificence (not harming patient).
    Autonomy (patient should be allowed to make their own decision, even if the decisions seems like a silly one and the doctor disagrees with it- the patient doesn't need to give an explanation for the decision either).
    Justice (distributing the time of doctors and medical resources fairly between patients).

    And I've also heard these two being used:
    Dignity (patients and medical staff have right to dignity).
    Truthfulness/honesty.

    http://www.ethics-network.org.uk/eth...iples-approach

    Also take a look at this on interviews, it knows way more than I do: :p:

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...hool_interview

    Sorry, link overload. But anyway, it's worth knowing some medical ethics to help you develop opinions and stuff, but I think they care more about how we reach conclusions with ethical scenarios?
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    (Original post by Unbiased Opinion)
    Tbh, I dunno. I think it's possible that they'd ask us ethical questions but they won't expect us to know GMC guidelines inside out: I think they just want to see our thought processes and see that we have empathy and stuff. But I think it's worth being aware of some ethical stuff (but, like, not yet, I don't think we need to start preparation for interviews for another few months, I just know a bit about medical ethics because we're doing it in RE atm).

    http://www.gmc-uk.org/guidance/case_studies.asp might be useful later on.

    Also the 4 principles of medical ethics:

    beneficence (acting in best interest of patient).
    Non-malificence (not harming patient).
    Autonomy (patient should be allowed to make their own decision, even if the decisions seems like a silly one and the doctor disagrees with it- the patient doesn't need to give an explanation for the decision either).
    Justice (distributing the time of doctors and medical resources fairly between patients).

    And I've also heard these two being used:
    Dignity (patients and medical staff have right to dignity).
    Truthfulness/honesty.

    http://www.ethics-network.org.uk/eth...iples-approach

    Also take a look at this on interviews, it knows way more than I do: :p:

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...hool_interview

    Sorry, link overload. But anyway, it's worth knowing some medical ethics to help you develop opinions and stuff, but I think they care more about how we reach conclusions with ethical scenarios?
    Okay thanks, that helps
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    In line with the ongoing discussion about ethics...

    During a medical consultation you found out that your patient who is underage had been smoking and consuming alcohol without his parent's knowledge. What would you do?
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    (Original post by Unbiased Opinion)
    I love how many perspectives we have on this now.

    GMC guidelines:

    http://www.gmc-uk.org/guidance/ethic...dance/7342.asp



    So you can't break confidentiality in my outlined situation, according to GMC guidelines, it seems.
    Nice, that's (basically) what I said



    (Original post by liviaaa)
    I was just wondering, do they ask you questions like this in interviews? It seems a bit odd, when we haven't even been taught the course yet - surely they have to teach us this?
    Yes many medical schools love asking questions on medical ethics, as it's relevant to medicine, is open to debate (so they get to challenge your response), and they get to see your trail of thought, as well as being able to test if your principles are what they look for. I think it's peninsula that gives you a choice of one of three ethical scenarios and a bit of time to think it over, then you discuss it with them afterwards.
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    (Original post by Unbiased Opinion)
    Tbh, I dunno. I think it's possible that they'd ask us ethical questions but they won't expect us to know GMC guidelines inside out: I think they just want to see our thought processes and see that we have empathy and stuff. But I think it's worth being aware of some ethical stuff (but, like, not yet, I don't think we need to start preparation for interviews for another few months, I just know a bit about medical ethics because we're doing it in RE atm).

    http://www.gmc-uk.org/guidance/case_studies.asp might be useful later on.

    Also the 4 principles of medical ethics:

    beneficence (acting in best interest of patient).
    Non-malificence (not harming patient).
    Autonomy (patient should be allowed to make their own decision, even if the decisions seems like a silly one and the doctor disagrees with it- the patient doesn't need to give an explanation for the decision either).
    Justice (distributing the time of doctors and medical resources fairly between patients).

    And I've also heard these two being used:
    Dignity (patients and medical staff have right to dignity).
    Truthfulness/honesty.

    http://www.ethics-network.org.uk/eth...iples-approach

    Also take a look at this on interviews, it knows way more than I do: :p:

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...hool_interview

    Sorry, link overload. But anyway, it's worth knowing some medical ethics to help you develop opinions and stuff, but I think they care more about how we reach conclusions with ethical scenarios?
    Looks really interesting! Thanks +1

    A Very Short Introduction to Medical Ethics is a nice read :yep: Tony Hope
 
 
 
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