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    (Original post by BieberFan)
    Don't be so naive.

    There's no certainty in the process (admittedly he has a good shot going off his posts but that's what we all said about people like F.H93 last year...)
    haterz got to say bad stuff dont they :mad: R.I.P. YH
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    (Original post by Rahul.S)
    haterz got to say bad stuff dont they :mad: R.I.P. YH
    Got nothing against the guy. I think he's good enough through judging his posts but realistically, no-one's a certainty. For starters, we don't even know his grades so the verdict is out on that one.
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    (Original post by BieberFan)
    Got nothing against the guy. I think he's good enough through judging his posts but realistically, no-one's a certainty. For starters, we don't even know his grades so the verdict is out on that one.
    true but lets keep the thread positive what college you applying for? got any offers yet? :cool:
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    (Original post by new123)
    Is this your first SAT attempt? How much are you expecting? Have you applied for US colleges already - if so, is it possible to apply without SAT scores?
    yes, 2xxx, no, not sure.
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    Has anybody got any tips for learning Decision 1 (D1) as I'll be doing the exam for the first time in Jan and its so abstract and theres just so many terms to learn!!!
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    (Original post by actuarialmaestro:p)
    Haha I doubt it does... you will be a local for fees purposes right? In that case I am a Pakistani student and I think THAT DOES make a difference :P
    Yeah, local for fees purposes but not doing A-levels so different qualifications. No other Scottish Maths people seem to have offers yet either so that's why I thought that being Scottish might have something to do with it.

    If you're an international student then yes, that probably will make a difference on when you hear back from uni's.
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    We've sort of fallen off the maths a bit here!

    Here's a question:

    Consider a ring of n blocks, where n is an even number. We write a number on each block. Let a_i represent the starting number on the ith block. Suppose that a_i is a strictly increasing sequence. We can perform an operation on these blocks where we add any real number to two consecutive blocks. Prove that we can never perform such operations in such a way as to have the same number on every block.

    HINT:

    Spoiler:
    Show
    show that \displaystyle\sum_{i=1}^n (-1)^{i+1} a_i is unchanging
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    (Original post by TheMagicMan)
    We've sort of fallen off the maths a bit here!

    Here's a question:

    Consider a ring of n blocks, where n is an even number. We write a number on each block. Let a_i represent the starting number on the ith block. Suppose that a_i is a strictly increasing sequence. We can perform an operation on these blocks where we add any real number to two consecutive blocks. Prove that we can never perform such operations in such a way as to have the same number on every block.
    Don't you think this should be posted in this thread?
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    (Original post by ben-smith)
    Don't you think this should be posted in this thread?
    No not really. It's actually quite easy if you think about it, but it's all I can think of for now.
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    (Original post by TheMagicMan)
    We've sort of fallen off the maths a bit here!

    Here's a question:

    Consider a ring of n blocks, where n is an even number. We write a number on each block. Let a_i represent the starting number on the ith block. Suppose that a_i is a strictly increasing sequence. We can perform an operation on these blocks where we add any real number to two consecutive blocks. Prove that we can never perform such operations in such a way as to have the same number on every block.

    HINT:

    Spoiler:
    Show
    show that \displaystyle\sum_{i=1}^n (-1)^{i+1} a_i is unchanging
    (This is assuming the sequence is arithmetic, I just realised that I had assumed it was and it isn't actually, I suppose the argument would still work with a bit of editing.)


    Spoiler:
    Show


    Let C be the difference between two consecutive blocks. Let a_k_+_2 be the nth block and let a_k_+_2=K. Suppose we add C to the two consecutive blocks a_k and a_k_+_1.

    Now because the difference between two consecutive blocks is C a_k_+_1 = a_k_+_2. And a_k_-_1 = a_k - 2C. If we add 2C to a_k_-_2 and a_k_-_1, then a_k_-_2=a_k. And now a_k_-_3=a_k_-_2 - 3C.

    We can only make one block equal to K everytime we do an operation, however the operation also affects the previous block. This means when we reach a_1=a_k_+_2 - nC=K where n is some positive integer, we must add nC to both a_1 and a_k_+_2 meaning all the blocks apart from a_k_+_2 equal K and to fix this we must add some multiple of C to every block in the circle again and this will repeat, i.e. will never reach the point where all blocks are equal.


    I feel that I have taken a lot of time to explain something obvious, and I'm also unsure about the rigour of my argument, I am worried there is a hole somewhere.
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    (Original post by deejayy)
    (This is assuming the sequence is arithmetic, I just realised that I had assumed it was and it isn't actually, I suppose the argument would still work with a bit of editing.)

    I feel that I have taken a lot of time to explain something obvious, and I'm also unsure about the rigour of my argument, I am worried there is a hole somewhere.
    Spoiler:
    Show
    The arithmetic bit doesn't really matter I think, as you could just say a_{i+1}-a_1=C_i instead and the same sort of argument follows. While your argument is not exactly formal, I think it is sound to a large extent. However, I would like to ask one question: assume that you have fixed n-2 blocks to a certain value. How do you know that the remaining two blocks are not the same and therefore adjustable to that value?
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    (Original post by TheMagicMan)
    Spoiler:
    Show
    The arithmetic bit doesn't really matter I think, as you could just say a_{i+1}-a_1=C_i instead and the same sort of argument follows. While your argument is not exactly formal, I think it is sound to a large extent. However, I would like to ask one question: assume that you have fixed n-2 blocks to a certain value. How do you know that the remaining two blocks are not the same and therefore adjustable to that value?
    Spoiler:
    Show
    The hint for the alternate plus/minus summation you gave in your original q is invariant when adding real numbers, and (as the squence is strictly increasing), is not zero originally. So we are done (as all constant terms require this sum to be zero).


    On a side note, anyone have any ideas on what kind of Qs will be asked on interviews? Don't think school will help much, so have some questions about interviews (if I get an invitation that is). Also, more importantly what constitues a "good" response to questions? Obviously solving the Qs help, but how rigiourously should we explain our reasoning (keeping time in mind)?
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    (Original post by twig)
    Spoiler:
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    The hint for the alternate plus/minus summation you gave in your original q is invariant when adding real numbers, and (as the squence is strictly increasing), is not zero originally. So we are done (as all constant terms require this sum to be zero).

    That seems the obvious solution to it, although some explanation as to why that summation is constant is probably required (I'd say it's only a line or two)
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    (Original post by twig)
    On a side note, anyone have any ideas on what kind of Qs will be asked on interviews? Don't think school will help much, so have some questions about interviews (if I get an invitation that is). Also, more importantly what constitues a "good" response to questions? Obviously solving the Qs help, but how rigiourously should we explain our reasoning (keeping time in mind)?
    Accuracy and speed are vital. They expect you to become stuck at some point and, in fact, this is in your favour as it gives them a chance to see how well you respond to their hints. Doing simple but clever things pay off, too. (in one of my questions, I was stopped after just moving a quantity from one side of an equation to the other and told "that is a very good idea."; then just carried on as before :p:.)

    You also need to try and sell yourself as "teachable". Don't give the impression that you know it all (I expect this shouldn't be a problem for most); and, more importantly, communicate your ideas in a clear and mathematically sound way. No hand-wavey business.

    Best of luck in getting an interview.
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    (Original post by BeccaCath94)
    Has anybody got any tips for learning Decision 1 (D1) as I'll be doing the exam for the first time in Jan and its so abstract and theres just so many terms to learn!!!
    do as many questions as you can to practice and go through all definitions they have ever asked a few days before the exam so that you remember them...I was so lucky there wasn't any definition questions in the last year jan D1 exam
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    (Original post by like_a_star)
    do as many questions as you can to practice and go through all definitions they have ever asked a few days before the exam so that you remember them...I was so lucky there wasn't any definition questions in the last year jan D1 exam
    Thank you Yeah I always do as many past papers for maths as i can as thats really the best way to revise/prepare for the exam so you remember the formulae and know what sort of questions will come up. I hope there arent many for my paper!!
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    (Original post by Farhan.Hanif93)
    Accuracy and speed are vital. They expect you to become stuck at some point and, in fact, this is in your favour as it gives them a chance to see how well you respond to their hints. Doing simple but clever things pay off, too. (in one of my questions, I was stopped after just moving a quantity from one side of an equation to the other and told "that is a very good idea."; then just carried on as before :p:.)

    You also need to try and sell yourself as "teachable". Don't give the impression that you know it all (I expect this shouldn't be a problem for most); and, more importantly, communicate your ideas in a clear and mathematically sound way. No hand-wavey business.

    Best of luck in getting an interview.
    Thanks for the response.
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    (Original post by new123)
    Is the official letter from maths dept or from the faculty dept? Does it have the offer/fee details?
    It's from the faculty, has the A*AA offer and that the tuition fees are standard (£9,000).
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    (Original post by snow leopard)
    Do you know roughly the number of applicants Warwick takes in every year for G103? Having hard time finding this info on their website.
    I don't know exactly, it's about 250 for both G100 and G103 I think.
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    (Original post by maths134)
    Without sounding like a ****, how much work do you do on average like a night? I mean I only have two offers and I'm already struggling to pick between Warwick and UCL =[.
    I would say about 12 hours a week, though it's usually not evenly spaced out...no work some weekdays and then 6 hours on Sunday
 
 
 
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