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    I do have an awful act for focussing on how bad I can do rather than how good! But I kinda like to know that if things go tits up there is always something that can save me!
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    Could anyone recommend me maths-related books to read in preparation & to mention on my personal statement, I've had a look at the Cambridge reading list, but I just wanted other prospective applicants opinion's on this.

    Would you recommend getting one basic higher-level maths book, then perhaps one further specialised book? With the further specialised book being calculus related?
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    (Original post by anil10100)
    Could anyone recommend me maths-related books to read in preparation & to mention on my personal statement, I've had a look at the Cambridge reading list, but I just wanted other prospective applicants opinion's on this.

    Would you recommend getting one basic higher-level maths book, then perhaps one further specialised book? With the further specialised book being calculus related?
    I've heard from my open day at King's that the interview is really for you to show ability to do maths, not ability to read. They do ask "so, read any good maths books you want to talk about?" or a similar question, to break the ice so to speak, but the emphasis is on how good you are at maths!

    But in terms of personal statement, I agree that you should absolutely make it clear you have read lots. Do not overwhelm yourself; play to your interests! If you want to get involved in higher level maths already, then great; but they won't expect you to.

    Relax

    I repeat once again: play to your interests. That is the general vibe I get from open days and discussions. They'd much rather you were able to remember and talk passionately about something you really enjoyed, than be able to say "yes, I read it, it was OK." Certainly in your personal statement, it's great if you can express real genuine interest in some things in higher mathematics that you genuinely like!
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    (Original post by anil10100)
    Could anyone recommend me maths-related books to read in preparation & to mention on my personal statement, I've had a look at the Cambridge reading list, but I just wanted other prospective applicants opinion's on this.

    Would you recommend getting one basic higher-level maths book, then perhaps one further specialised book? With the further specialised book being calculus related?
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=1619436

    I asked this question on a thread a while back, check the link out.
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    (Original post by Xero Xenith)
    I've heard from my open day at King's that the interview is really for you to show ability to do maths, not ability to read. They do ask "so, read any good maths books you want to talk about?" or a similar question, to break the ice so to speak, but the emphasis is on how good you are at maths!
    Off topic, but this might be of use to others thinking of applying to different colleges.

    What it seems like each college has a different policy on asking general questions/icebreakers - for me at Sidney, for example, both interviews followed this basic routine: walk in, do maths, leave. But I've also heard of other colleges devoting an entire interview just to general questions - King's obviously being neither of these extremes.
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    At an interview what is meant by 'checking your ability to do maths'?? Do you get like a test???
    Surely your A levels will show how good you are!!
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    (Original post by ben-smith)
    I'm pretty set on Cambridge as I quite enjoy doing STEP.
    I intend on quoting you on this in a year's time. STEP suddenly becomes less fun when the pressure is on.
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    (Original post by SimonM)
    I intend on quoting you on this in a year's time. STEP suddenly becomes less fun when the pressure is on.
    For that to even become relevant I will have to get an offer in the first place, something that is altogether unlikely.
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    (Original post by BeccaCath94)
    At an interview what is meant by 'checking your ability to do maths'?? Do you get like a test???
    Surely your A levels will show how good you are!!
    In the eyes of Oxbridge, A-levels are nothing. So instead, they sit there with you and work with you on a harder, more difficult to grasp problem. (Obviously they expect you to do most of the work, helping you as you may need!)

    By doing this they hope to get an idea of your natural mathematical ability and insight.

    (Original post by Zuzuzu)
    Off topic, but this might be of use to others thinking of applying to different colleges.

    What it seems like each college has a different policy on asking general questions/icebreakers - for me at Sidney, for example, both interviews followed this basic routine: walk in, do maths, leave. But I've also heard of other colleges devoting an entire interview just to general questions - King's obviously being neither of these extremes.
    Many thanks for this information! I signed up for the day at King's because the open day I went to recommended that you check out a college in the morning, and King's was the only one that put a link to do it online I'm still undecided about which college, and indeed which uni (Ox or Cam). Interesting
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    (Original post by Xero Xenith)
    In the eyes of Oxbridge, A-levels are nothing. So instead, they sit there with you and work with you on a harder, more difficult to grasp problem. (Obviously they expect you to do most of the work, helping you as you may need!)

    By doing this they hope to get an idea of your natural mathematical ability and insight.
    Oh i see....What about lesser unis such as Lancaster, Leeds, Sheffield....
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    (Original post by Xero Xenith)
    In the eyes of Oxbridge, A-levels are nothing. So instead, they sit there with you and work with you on a harder, more difficult to grasp problem. (Obviously they expect you to do most of the work, helping you as you may need!)
    Definitely wouldn't go that far. You still have entry requirements for your A-levels, and if you're not exceeding an average of 90 UMS in AS (and so not predicted an A* in A2) you will probably not be interviewed.

    But the problem with A-levels are sometimes they can just assess hard work. A girl in my class isn't PARTICULARLY talented at maths (if she worked an average amount, probably a low A/high B student or lower), her talents lie elsewhere, but she works extremely hard, like harder than I've ever seen anyone work - and she got 100UMS in Core 1 (not the hardest feat, I know, but one nonetheless). She wouldn't have the mathematical ability to do it at university - she works unbelievably hard at A-levels to get good grades and the jump to university would force her not to have enough time in the day to work (just to catch up etc). Her A-levels wouldn't reflect this.

    As well as that Cambridge Maths is particularly rigorous.
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    (Original post by BeccaCath94)
    Oh i see....What about lesser unis such as Lancaster, Leeds, Sheffield....
    I don't think they interview normally.

    (Original post by hassi94)
    Definitely wouldn't go that far. You still have entry requirements for your A-levels, and if you're not exceeding an average of 90 UMS in AS (and so not predicted an A* in A2) you will probably not be interviewed.

    But the problem with A-levels are sometimes they can just assess hard work. A girl in my class isn't PARTICULARLY talented at maths (if she worked an average amount, probably a low A/high B student or lower), her talents lie elsewhere, but she works extremely hard, like harder than I've ever seen anyone work - and she got 100UMS in Core 1 (not the hardest feat, I know, but one nonetheless). She wouldn't have the mathematical ability to do it at university - she works unbelievably hard at A-levels to get good grades and the jump to university would force her not to have enough time in the day to work (just to catch up etc). Her A-levels wouldn't reflect this.

    As well as that Cambridge Maths is particularly rigorous.
    My apologies - the mistake was in the way I phrased it. I meant that they assume all students who come for interview will have an average of 90+ UMS in most modules, so they need a better way of deciding early who's Oxbridge material. A-levels are easy compared to university. That's all I meant, and thanks for pointing out my terrible wording

    To clarify to others - they do care about your A-levels! They want you to ace them, because they view them as easy enough to ace for any reasonable applicant!
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    (Original post by hassi94)
    Definitely wouldn't go that far. You still have entry requirements for your A-levels, and if you're not exceeding an average of 90 UMS in AS (and so not predicted an A* in A2) you will probably not be interviewed.

    But the problem with A-levels are sometimes they can just assess hard work. A girl in my class isn't PARTICULARLY talented at maths (if she worked an average amount, probably a low A/high B student or lower), her talents lie elsewhere, but she works extremely hard, like harder than I've ever seen anyone work - and she got 100UMS in Core 1 (not the hardest feat, I know, but one nonetheless). She wouldn't have the mathematical ability to do it at university - she works unbelievably hard at A-levels to get good grades and the jump to university would force her not to have enough time in the day to work (just to catch up etc). Her A-levels wouldn't reflect this.

    As well as that Cambridge Maths is particularly rigorous.
    I think I will get 90+ UMS for AS Maths, but not for AS Further Maths (probably an average of about 80), which I had to teach myself. Is that going to be a big disadvantage?
    Thanks!
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    (Original post by Benniboi1)
    I think I will get 90+ UMS for AS Maths, but not for AS Further Maths (probably an average of about 80), which I had to teach myself. Is that going to be a big disadvantage?
    Thanks!
    I think I was coming out quite strong there actually, saying you need to have 90+ to be interviewed was a bit wrong, especially since most candidates are interviewed, though even after interview UMS is taken quite heavily into account.

    I wouldn't worry about getting 80 something in further especially since you're teaching yourself, they make allowances for things like that. Really if you show great mathematical thinking and a lot of potential in interviews, a few percentage points aren't going to hold you back.
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    (Original post by hassi94)
    I think I was coming out quite strong there actually, saying you need to have 90+ to be interviewed was a bit wrong, especially since most candidates are interviewed, though even after interview UMS is taken quite heavily into account.

    I wouldn't worry about getting 80 something in further especially since you're teaching yourself, they make allowances for things like that. Really if you show great mathematical thinking and a lot of potential in interviews, a few percentage points aren't going to hold you back.
    Thanks very much, I'm having a hard time deciding whether or not to apply to Oxford. I would love to study maths there, but I can't help but feel my chances are slim; 2 A*s 5 A's 2 B's and a C at GCSE and most likely AAAB/AABB at AS level.
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    (Original post by Benniboi1)
    Thanks very much, I'm having a hard time deciding whether or not to apply to Oxford. I would love to study maths there, but I can't help but feel my chances are slim; 2 A*s 5 A's 2 B's and a C at GCSE and most likely AAAB/AABB at AS level.
    Unfortunately Oxford require A*A* in Further Maths you could always try that extra bit harder, but AAAB won't cut it I'm afraid

    EDIT: As stated below, I'm lying. You can't get A* at AS - sorry, misread your post!
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    (Original post by Xero Xenith)
    Unfortunately Oxford require A*A* in Further Maths you could always try that extra bit harder, but AAAB won't cut it I'm afraid
    He was talking AS, you can't get A*s at AS.

    To benniboi - I'd definitely go for it and try your best to get as many As as possible. Oxford don't look at UMS so any A in maths/further is an A.
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    Casually decided to forget to book open days, now they're all fully booked

    I don't need them anyway
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    (Original post by Benniboi1)
    Thanks very much, I'm having a hard time deciding whether or not to apply to Oxford. I would love to study maths there, but I can't help but feel my chances are slim; 2 A*s 5 A's 2 B's and a C at GCSE and most likely AAAB/AABB at AS level.
    Oxford don't care about GCSEs, you practically have the same GCSEs as me. A lot of weight is put on the MAT admission test, if you think you can get A*A* in Maths/Further (and can convince your tutors to predict that) then there isn't any harm in applying. Just make sure you don't apply to all over-subscribed courses. On the whole, maths entry isn't very competitive, but at places like Oxbridge, Imperial, Bristol, Bath it's even more competitive than medicine.
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    (Original post by Noble.)
    Oxford don't care about GCSEs, you practically have the same GCSEs as me. A lot of weight is put on the MAT admission test, if you think you can get A*A* in Maths/Further (and can convince your tutors to predict that) then there isn't any harm in applying. Just make sure you don't apply to all over-subscribed courses. On the whole, maths entry isn't very competitive, but at places like Oxbridge, Imperial, Bristol, Bath it's even more competitive than medicine.
    The Tutor's at my sixth form are pretty lenient with predicted grades, especially when Oxbridge is mentioned, so fingers crossed I will be predicted A*A*. Are you currently applying to Oxford/Cambridge?

    The Aptitude Test doesn't seem as hard as STEP, I'm fairly sure with practice I could take it on. (famous last words )

    Anyone got any idea's of fairly good maths Uni's that would be good backup
    choices when applying?

    Cheers!
 
 
 
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