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    add me in please, I'm applying
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    (Original post by desijut)
    May as well add me in:

    GCSEs - 6A* 3A 1B
    AS - Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Critical Thinking and Maths (did the whole A level this year, doing further next year)
    Universities - Cambridge, Warwick, Imperial, UCL, LSE(Maths with Econ)

    Also im in the middle of reading Fermat's Last Theorem by Simon Singh which i think is a brilliant book at the moment
    Wow you really haven't left yourself much of a backup!
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    (Original post by hassi94)
    Wow you really haven't left yourself much of a backup!
    Nothing wrong with those options :p:

    Actually, the only things that are different compared to myself is that desijut is doing Critical Thinking and the GCSE results are different.
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    (Original post by TheTallOne)
    Nothing wrong with those options :p:

    Actually, the only things that are different compared to myself is that desijut is doing Critical Thinking and the GCSE results are different.
    Ha fair enough but I need to have 1 option where I'm almost certain I will get an offer (going to be Manchester now I think - reminds me I should change my signature). I did want to apply to LSE but I'm not sure if I'll enjoy the economics portion. Can I ask you actually, having never studied economics how do you know you'll have an interest in it?
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    (Original post by hassi94)
    Ha fair enough but I need to have 1 option where I'm almost certain I will get an offer (going to be Manchester now I think - reminds me I should change my signature). I did want to apply to LSE but I'm not sure if I'll enjoy the economics portion. Can I ask you actually, having never studied economics how do you know you'll have an interest in it?
    I studied Business Studies & Economics at GCSE, and I enjoyed it - the subject seems logical. But I didn't do Economics at A Level because the department's teaching quality at my school was poor.
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    (Original post by TheTallOne)
    I studied Business Studies & Economics at GCSE, and I enjoyed it - the subject seems logical. But I didn't do Economics at A Level because the department's teaching quality at my school was poor.
    Ah right I see. I guess I should check out some course content and see. Apparently though LSE maths isn't very pure, and is based more on discreet mathematics (which I've absolutely despised this year - it's very easy at A-level but boring as hell). Will have to do some more research.
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    (Original post by hassi94)
    Ah right I see. I guess I should check out some course content and see. Apparently though LSE maths isn't very pure, and is based more on discreet mathematics (which I've absolutely despised this year - it's very easy at A-level but boring as hell). Will have to do some more research.
    Should make it clear that I've just finished second year at Warwick - it was just that my A levels and UCAS preferences were the same :p:
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    (Original post by hassi94)
    Ah right I see. I guess I should check out some course content and see. Apparently though LSE maths isn't very pure, and is based more on discreet mathematics (which I've absolutely despised this year - it's very easy at A-level but boring as hell). Will have to do some more research.
    I have heard that LSE maths is far from rigourous (e.g. I know that you end up doing 100% for the same content as some of the straight econ, and business maths and stats students), and the difficulty does not get higher than STEP at most (where as at COWI you will certainly exceed this in terms of conceptuality). Although the career prospects are supposedly good. And of course, no physics.
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    (Original post by TheTallOne)
    Should make it clear that I've just finished second year at Warwick - it was just that my A levels and UCAS preferences were the same :p:
    Ahaha right I see! I feel a bit silly now. How are you finding Warwick? Are you going pure or applied or a bit of both? Why?

    Sorry for the multitude of questions, just not every day you get to ask an (almost) 3rd year student.
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    (Original post by hassi94)
    Ahaha right I see! I feel a bit silly now. How are you finding Warwick? Are you going pure or applied or a bit of both? Why?

    Sorry for the multitude of questions, just not every day you get to ask an (almost) 3rd year student.
    I found first year interesting and quite easy - the majority of the concepts all seemed to make some sense. Second year was just like "" - I did horrendously bad (by my standards) and I don't think I properly got the grips of any sort of module this year. That said, I love the campus atmosphere, and the clubs and societies. First year I didn't really make the most of it (I perhaps spent too much time on my course) but second year I loved life outside of my degree.

    I'm going to probably do a mix of Analysis and Statistics from now on in, with the added contribution of the optional modules (for me mainly Business and Economics) we can take at Warwick - more on that later. Reasons why I'm not doing more pure - the Algebra II course was like trying to swim through syrup - there was too much content to learn (probably down to the lecturer) - I know hardly anything useful to do further study in that field. Geometry/Number Theory might be options, but I haven't done a great deal on either this year. Topology might be another option.

    Not doing any more Physics because I didn't do enough in my first year - only took one module of Classical Mechanics and Special Relativity. The lecturer was boring as hell. Although if you are really interested in Physics there are perhaps 10+ modules you can take in the first two years.

    Philosophy is another option, but I didn't take any of it. Same for Computer Science/discrete - not interested in coding that much. Language modules I hate. I hate languages.

    So that's probably all the modules that you can take described each in half a sentence. At Warwick you have a lot of freedom in your course. First year you can choose between 25%-40% of your modules, second year between 45-56% are your choice - none of your options have to be Maths (though you need to do a bit more if you want to do 4 years), third year everything is your choice, and between 38%-47% needs to be in Maths (ok, so a fair bit more if you do 4 years). And 4th year you have so many options I think it is impossible to put a percentage on how much of your course has to be Maths and how much can be outside of Maths.

    This is a summary of your options and you can find out more by checking out the PYDC
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    (Original post by TheTallOne)
    I found first year interesting and quite easy - the majority of the concepts all seemed to make some sense. Second year was just like "" - I did horrendously bad (by my standards) and I don't think I properly got the grips of any sort of module this year. That said, I love the campus atmosphere, and the clubs and societies. First year I didn't really make the most of it (I perhaps spent too much time on my course) but second year I loved life outside of my degree.

    I'm going to probably do a mix of Analysis and Statistics from now on in, with the added contribution of the optional modules (for me mainly Business and Economics) we can take at Warwick - more on that later. Reasons why I'm not doing more pure - the Algebra II course was like trying to swim through syrup - there was too much content to learn (probably down to the lecturer) - I know hardly anything useful to do further study in that field. Geometry/Number Theory might be options, but I haven't done a great deal on either this year. Topology might be another option.

    Not doing any more Physics because I didn't do enough in my first year - only took one module of Classical Mechanics and Special Relativity. The lecturer was boring as hell. Although if you are really interested in Physics there are perhaps 10+ modules you can take in the first two years.

    Philosophy is another option, but I didn't take any of it. Same for Computer Science/discrete - not interested in coding that much. Language modules I hate. I hate languages.

    So that's probably all the modules that you can take described each in half a sentence. At Warwick you have a lot of freedom in your course. First year you can choose between 25%-40% of your modules, second year between 45-56% are your choice - none of your options have to be Maths (though you need to do a bit more if you want to do 4 years), third year everything is your choice, and between 38%-47% needs to be in Maths (ok, so a fair bit more if you do 4 years). And 4th year you have so many options I think it is impossible to put a percentage on how much of your course has to be Maths and how much can be outside of Maths.

    This is a summary of your options and you can find out more by checking out the PYDC
    Hi! I really really love Warwick and hope to go there in 2012 but was just wondering about a few things.

    How did you revise for your maths exams? So far I don't really revise apart from doing a few past papers. And how did you find the work load? Did it overwhelm you or was it easy to adjust to?

    This isn't about maths but just general uni life: how often do people go out? I don't want to be stuck in my room all day but don't want to be going out every other night either. And are there a lot of things to do? I've heard that its kind of isolated .
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    (Original post by TheTallOne)
    I found first year interesting and quite easy - the majority of the concepts all seemed to make some sense. Second year was just like "" - I did horrendously bad (by my standards) and I don't think I properly got the grips of any sort of module this year. That said, I love the campus atmosphere, and the clubs and societies. First year I didn't really make the most of it (I perhaps spent too much time on my course) but second year I loved life outside of my degree.

    I'm going to probably do a mix of Analysis and Statistics from now on in, with the added contribution of the optional modules (for me mainly Business and Economics) we can take at Warwick - more on that later. Reasons why I'm not doing more pure - the Algebra II course was like trying to swim through syrup - there was too much content to learn (probably down to the lecturer) - I know hardly anything useful to do further study in that field. Geometry/Number Theory might be options, but I haven't done a great deal on either this year. Topology might be another option.

    Not doing any more Physics because I didn't do enough in my first year - only took one module of Classical Mechanics and Special Relativity. The lecturer was boring as hell. Although if you are really interested in Physics there are perhaps 10+ modules you can take in the first two years.

    Philosophy is another option, but I didn't take any of it. Same for Computer Science/discrete - not interested in coding that much. Language modules I hate. I hate languages.

    So that's probably all the modules that you can take described each in half a sentence. At Warwick you have a lot of freedom in your course. First year you can choose between 25%-40% of your modules, second year between 45-56% are your choice - none of your options have to be Maths (though you need to do a bit more if you want to do 4 years), third year everything is your choice, and between 38%-47% needs to be in Maths (ok, so a fair bit more if you do 4 years). And 4th year you have so many options I think it is impossible to put a percentage on how much of your course has to be Maths and how much can be outside of Maths.

    This is a summary of your options and you can find out more by checking out the PYDC
    Can you change to related courses such as MMORSE/MORSE, maths and econ, etc. after/during your first(maybe second?!) year, and can you choose to change from a Ba to Mmath in after your first year (providing you get a 2.1 or above)?
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    (Original post by TheTallOne)
    I found first year interesting and quite easy - the majority of the concepts all seemed to make some sense. Second year was just like "" - I did horrendously bad (by my standards) and I don't think I properly got the grips of any sort of module this year. That said, I love the campus atmosphere, and the clubs and societies. First year I didn't really make the most of it (I perhaps spent too much time on my course) but second year I loved life outside of my degree.

    I'm going to probably do a mix of Analysis and Statistics from now on in, with the added contribution of the optional modules (for me mainly Business and Economics) we can take at Warwick - more on that later. Reasons why I'm not doing more pure - the Algebra II course was like trying to swim through syrup - there was too much content to learn (probably down to the lecturer) - I know hardly anything useful to do further study in that field. Geometry/Number Theory might be options, but I haven't done a great deal on either this year. Topology might be another option.

    Not doing any more Physics because I didn't do enough in my first year - only took one module of Classical Mechanics and Special Relativity. The lecturer was boring as hell. Although if you are really interested in Physics there are perhaps 10+ modules you can take in the first two years.

    Philosophy is another option, but I didn't take any of it. Same for Computer Science/discrete - not interested in coding that much. Language modules I hate. I hate languages.

    So that's probably all the modules that you can take described each in half a sentence. At Warwick you have a lot of freedom in your course. First year you can choose between 25%-40% of your modules, second year between 45-56% are your choice - none of your options have to be Maths (though you need to do a bit more if you want to do 4 years), third year everything is your choice, and between 38%-47% needs to be in Maths (ok, so a fair bit more if you do 4 years). And 4th year you have so many options I think it is impossible to put a percentage on how much of your course has to be Maths and how much can be outside of Maths.

    This is a summary of your options and you can find out more by checking out the PYDC
    Thanks a lot for all of that. Was good to have that summary! I'll be sure to check out the links. Thanks again for taking the time to make a big reply!
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    (Original post by twig)
    Can you change to related courses such as MMORSE/MORSE, maths and econ, etc. after/during your first(maybe second?!) year, and can you choose to change from a Ba to Mmath in after your first year (providing you get a 2.1 or above)?
    There are four departments at Warwick that offer first degrees in Mathematics:
    Maths: Maths BSc, Maths MMath, Maths and Economics BSc, Maths and Business Studies BSc, Maths and Philosophy BSc
    Statistics: MORSE BSc, MMORSE, Maths and Stats BSc, MMath and Stats
    Computer Sciences: Discrete Mathematics
    Physics: Maths and Physics

    For the Maths department at least, they consider all offers towards the 5 Maths degrees together - there is no point in applying to Maths and the MMath. You can easily switch between these 5 degrees with just a form, provided you have completed relevant modules (for example to go to Maths and Economics after year 1, you need to have done the modules 'Introduction to Quantitative Economics'). For the sake of funding, if you want to apply for the Maths course, choose the MMath over the Maths BSc. It's easier to drop down rather than go up, especially after the second year. To progress onto the MMath, at present you need to attain 65% in your best 90 CATS in 'Maths modules' in your second year. You can get 60-65% and the department will 'advise' you to drop to the BSc but will not force you to.

    An application to the Maths department and the Stats department will be considered separately. People do switch between them (although a general rule is that you need to have met the UCAS offer for the course you are switching to). Similarly it is possible to switch between Maths and Maths Physics (it seems though that a lot of Maths Phys students either switch to Maths or Physics after their first year).

    Short answer: Between departments: probably, provided you have done sufficient modules, meet the UCAS offer and have a good reason. Within departments: easy after the first year, provided you have done the necessary modules. It becomes more difficult to switch to Maths and Econ/Phil after year 2, as you won't have done enough of the Econ/Phil modules. Maths and Business could be seen as a possible course that soaks up some of the people who struggled with the second year Maths course though. But switching from them to Maths is easier. Maths and MMath is easy too switch up to the end of second year too.
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    (Original post by like_a_star)
    Hi! I really really love Warwick and hope to go there in 2012 but was just wondering about a few things.

    How did you revise for your maths exams? So far I don't really revise apart from doing a few past papers. And how did you find the work load? Did it overwhelm you or was it easy to adjust to?

    This isn't about maths but just general uni life: how often do people go out? I don't want to be stuck in my room all day but don't want to be going out every other night either. And are there a lot of things to do? I've heard that its kind of isolated .
    Best way is to practice - "Maths is not a spectator sport". Although practice is not everything. Once you become competent at questions, get started on the theory to fill in the gaps that they test on this. I screwed up second year because I didn't do enough theory in my single January module and got screwed over majorly because of that. Then for my April/June exams I spent too much time on theory and not enough on practice. Oh and I spent too much time on Algebra II and had to learn another module in 41 hours (that didn't go well).

    Got to ask, at the moment what do you think you will do on a Maths degree? How do you think it will compare to A Level or IB? I'll then answer your questions on workload :p: I'm just interested on what people who are applying in a few months currently think about what's ahead of them.

    How often do people go out? Obviously it depends. At Warwick some people don't go out. Others go out loads. Some types of Maths students you meet at Warwick rarely out at all (and when you meet them you might see why). Others do. But uni isn't just about the people who spend lectures with - you also have the people who live with and spend time with in sports clubs and societies. You will meet people from all courses and in different years/studying at different levels. For me, I found out that first year (on campus) I went out more than in second year (off campus). Freshers is basically go out every day for two weeks, but it dies down after that. First year I perhaps went out 3 times a week on average for the first 2 terms, with a couple of quiet weeks (perhaps not going out for a week or two - too much work??) and a couple of binge weeks where I got out 6 times in 8 days.

    Third term I went out much less. A bit after my April exams, but from week 3 to week 8 pretty much nothing. But the 2 weeks after exams are amazing. It's better than Freshers because at Warwick you have lectures during Freshers while after exams you have absolutely nothing and you spend time with people you already know and are friends with. Do not go home after exams. Free BBQs, nothing to do but relax, sun (hopefully), stay on the piazza all night and spend the early hours of the morning after the last night out of the year in a make shift outdoor hot tub (a paddling pool that you fill with hot water for an hour). Best week of my life. Second year I probably went out an average of 2 times a week - but this time one of those was circling in socials with Mixed Netball and the other with my friends who I lived with in the first year.

    Obviously there are other things to do than go an get drunk. At night, you can go watch films at the Student Cinema, eat out in Leamington or Coventry, just chill in your room with friends or inevitably (as a student) do work. There are plenty of societies and sports clubs you can join as well! They have their own socials too so you can spend your time going to them and meet people who are not those you live or study with. In the summer before you arrive, go have a look at the different socs and clubs you can join - speak to them in the Socs/Sports Fairs and get flyers/sign up for their mailing list. Then go to a taster session and see if you like it. Do that with a good handful of clubs and join the ones you like If you do nothing, then it won't come to you - you need to give a little to get back a lot from uni life.
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    (Original post by desijut)
    May as well add me in:

    GCSEs - 6A* 3A 1B
    AS - Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Critical Thinking and Maths (did the whole A level this year, doing further next year)
    Universities - Cambridge, Warwick, Imperial, UCL, LSE(Maths with Econ)

    Also im in the middle of reading Fermat's Last Theorem by Simon Singh which i think is a brilliant book at the moment
    IM CURRENTLY READING THAT

    although my only draw back is that its sort of written so a noob can understand, I WANT HARDCORE MATHS. MMmm mmm finger lickin good`
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    (Original post by Jampolo)
    IM CURRENTLY READING THAT

    although my only draw back is that its sort of written so a noob can understand, I WANT HARDCORE MATHS. MMmm mmm finger lickin good`
    Well...if it was written in a harder way none of the readers would be able to understand it! Not that many people do anyway...
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    (Original post by jameswhughes)
    Well...if it was written in a harder way none of the readers would be able to understand it! Not that many people do anyway...
    I prefer Ian Stewart though because he doesn't simplify it down to where you have notes in the book telling you what x^2 is, his books contain readable high level mathematics
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    (Original post by Jampolo)
    I prefer Ian Stewart though because he doesn't simplify it down to where you have notes in the book telling you what x^2 is, his books contain readable high level mathematics
    They don't though. Anything you get from reading maths books is just an exposition, not the actual subject itself.
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    Heyy Im thinkin about either MORSE at Warwick, or Financial Mathematics at Nottingham or Loughborough, or Maths with Business Mangaement at Birmingham... and perhgahs Oxford (unsure yet tho ! )
    Got 10 A*s and 1 A at GCSE
    Taking Maths Further Maths Chem Bio and Eng Lang (but dropping one ..)

    Anyone else thinkin about the same courses??

    And Ive read Fermats last theorem.. curently on the Code Book (but not really maths related desipte being by the same author) hahaaa
 
 
 
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