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    I know this is oxidation process but dunno how H (hydrogen) is produced!!!!!!??:rolleyes:

    Can somebody help me out with this!!!
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    (Original post by arvin_infinity)
    I know this is oxidation process but dunno how H (hydrogen) is produced!!!!!!??:rolleyes:

    Can somebody help me out with this!!!
    Reduced NAD contains hydrogen, when this is lost, it is converted back to NAD.
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    (Original post by Rainbow249)
    Reduced NAD contains hydrogen, when this is lost, it is converted back to NAD.
    Emm but When something is oxidised it loses electron not hydrogen!
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    (Original post by arvin_infinity)
    I know this is oxidation process but dunno how H (hydrogen) is produced!!!!!!??:rolleyes:

    Can somebody help me out with this!!!
    Reduced NAD can also be called NADH. NAD is a coenzyme used to transport hydrogen ions to the the mitochondriol membranes to allow for chemiosmosis and the turning of ATP synthase to produce ATP.

    Reduction is gaining electrons. This site explains NAD nicely:

    http://www.sp.uconn.edu/~terry/229sp...tures/NAD.html

    But here is a simple diagram:



    (Original post by petoid12)
    You need to learn what reduced means, when something is reduced it is when hydrogen is added to, or oxygen is removed!

    So in order for Reduced NAD to become NAD, the reduced NAD needs to be oxidised ie - removing Hydrogen!
    The actual definition of reduction is gaining electrons, and oxidation being the loss of electrons.

    Oxidation
    Is
    Loss
    Reducation
    Is
    Gain
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    (Original post by sicarius1992)
    Reduced NAD can also be called NADH. NAD is a coenzyme used to transport hydrogen ions to the the mitochondriol membranes to allow for chemiosmosis and the turning of ATP synthase to produce ATP.

    Reduction is gaining electrons. This site explains NAD nicely:

    http://www.sp.uconn.edu/~terry/229sp...tures/NAD.html

    But here is a simple diagram:





    The actual definition of reduction is gaining electrons, and oxidation being the loss of electrons.

    Oxidation
    Is
    Loss
    Reducation
    Is
    Gain
    Thanks got it now..I just did oxidative phosphorylation again and now I understand it..but Im confusing inter-membrane space with crista!! are they the same!?
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    (Original post by arvin_infinity)
    Thanks got it now..I just did oxidative phosphorylation again and now I understand it..but Im confusing inter-membrane space with crista!! are they the same!?
    no theyre not, intermembrane space is the area formed inbetween the inner and outer membranes
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    (Original post by arvin_infinity)
    Thanks got it now..I just did oxidative phosphorylation again and now I understand it..but Im confusing inter-membrane space with crista!! are they the same!?
    Sort of.



    The cristae are folds in the inner membrane, this is good because it increases the surface area which allows for more ATP synthases and whatnot. The space between the inner and outer membranes is the inter-membrane space.

    The hydrogen ions are forced into this space, then because there is a concentration gradient they flow back into the matrix. As this happens they turn the ATP synthase to allow it to join ADP to Pi to make ATP.

    (The cytosol is just the fluid surrounding the organelles, the cytoplasm is cytosol + organelles)

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    (Original post by arvin_infinity)
    Emm but When something is oxidised it loses electron not hydrogen!
    Oxidation can be used to describe:

    - Loss of electrons
    - Loss of Hydrogen
    - Gain of Oxygen

    Reduction can be used to describe:

    - Gain of electrons
    - Gain of Hydrogen
    - Loss of Oxygen
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    (Original post by sicarius1992)
    Sort of.



    The cristae are folds in the inner membrane, this is good because it increases the surface area which allows for more ATP synthases and whatnot. The space between the inner and outer membranes is the inter-membrane space.

    The hydrogen ions are forced into this space, then because there is a concentration gradient they flow back into the matrix. As this happens they turn the ATP synthase to allow it to join ADP to Pi to make ATP.

    (The cytosol is just the fluid surrounding the organelles, the cytoplasm is cytosol + organelles)

    Do you ever step back and think how insane it is that all these processes have come together in a cell? I mean, even ignoring the difficulty/logistics of contructing the system, I don't think humans could ever come up with such a clever and elegant process for generating energy. Plus this is only one of hundreds, thousands maybe, of processeses that go on in a cell.

    Incredible.

    (btw, I'm not trying to hint at intelligent design here - just admiring how nature has totally overcome entropy)
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    (Original post by atheistwithfaith)
    Do you ever step back and think how insane it is that all these processes have come together in a cell? I mean, even ignoring the difficulty/logistics of contructing the system, I don't think humans could ever come up with such a clever and elegant process for generating energy. Plus this is only one of hundreds, thousands maybe, of processeses that go on in a cell.

    Incredible.

    (btw, I'm not trying to hint at intelligent design here - just admiring how nature has totally overcome entropy)
    This is entirely the reason that I'm a biologist. It's absolutely breath-taking and awe-inspiring.
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    (Original post by atheistwithfaith)
    Do you ever step back and think how insane it is that all these processes have come together in a cell? I mean, even ignoring the difficulty/logistics of contructing the system, I don't think humans could ever come up with such a clever and elegant process for generating energy. Plus this is only one of hundreds, thousands maybe, of processeses that go on in a cell.

    Incredible.

    (btw, I'm not trying to hint at intelligent design here - just admiring how nature has totally overcome entropy)


    I'm sure everyone's seen this video by now but it is so amazing I'll just go ahead and post it again
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    (Original post by atheistwithfaith)
    Do you ever step back and think how insane it is that all these processes have come together in a cell? I mean, even ignoring the difficulty/logistics of contructing the system, I don't think humans could ever come up with such a clever and elegant process for generating energy. Plus this is only one of hundreds, thousands maybe, of processeses that go on in a cell.

    Incredible.

    (btw, I'm not trying to hint at intelligent design here - just admiring how nature has totally overcome entropy)
    My interests in biochemistry come from that idea It's very elegant.
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    (Original post by atheistwithfaith)
    Do you ever step back and think how insane it is that all these processes have come together in a cell? I mean, even ignoring the difficulty/logistics of contructing the system, I don't think humans could ever come up with such a clever and elegant process for generating energy. Plus this is only one of hundreds, thousands maybe, of processeses that go on in a cell.

    Incredible.

    (btw, I'm not trying to hint at intelligent design here - just admiring how nature has totally overcome entropy)
    I was reading my notes and I am not sure about this bit!! >

    Glycolysis: Cytoplasm
    Link Reaction: Matrix
    Krebs cycle: Matrix
    Oxidative phosphorylation : Inner mitochondrion membrane

    Correct it if am wrong pls
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    (Original post by arvin_infinity)
    I was reading my notes and I am not sure about this bit!! >

    Glycolysis: Cytoplasm
    Link Reaction: Matrix
    Krebs cycle: Matrix
    Oxidative phosphorylation : Inner mitochondrion membrane

    Correct it if am wrong pls
    I'm pretty sure that is correct.
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    (Original post by atheistwithfaith)
    I'm pretty sure that is correct.
    Im a bit confused cuz I was doing this question on BYB4 2004...

    WHy muscle cells have more crista ? Cuz of larger surface area for electron transport chain

    I still dunno if crista is the same as inter-membrane space (Also my notes: innermembrane lol)



    And a year later:
    I now do understand it all
 
 
 
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