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Adoption of the Euro - Left Wing or Right Wing watch

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    Honest question, because I'm not sure...
    Would you consider a policy to adopt the Euro, and make it the national currency of the UK, a Right wing or Left wing policy, or would it depend on other matters?



    Thank you all!



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    I don't think adopting the euro is a position supported clearly or consistently by either the right or left in Britain.

    I'd say that wanting to adopt the euro is probably slightly left-wing as the left tend to be more pro-Europe in general. However, lots of left-wingers are anti-Europe (and some right-wing politicians who are very supportive of the a more integrated Europe).

    The conservative party want to "conserve" our British traditions a bit more, hence not changing our political structure by giving more power to the EU and not changing our currency.
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    Left wing and a stupid one at that.
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    Neither. Whether to enter into a monetary union is not something that falls on the left-right spectrum. This is merely an example of why a one-dimensional left-right spectrum is so stupid.
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    (Original post by jesusandtequila)
    Neither. Whether to enter into a monetary union is not something that falls on the left-right spectrum. This is merely an example of why a one-dimensional left-right spectrum is so stupid.
    I thought it would be like this, a I know labour supporters who love it and hate it and conservatives too.
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    I would also say neither side. Both see benefits and both see problems with adopting the Euro.
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    its definately left, but only becuase the European Union is a socialist structure.
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    The adoption of a single currency could be argued to be a free-trade move so more to the right of the political spectrum. However, in the specific case of the Euro this is canceled out by the opposition of the right to one-state Europeanism, which has been argued to be the final aim of the EU.
    It's a neo-centrist idea I suppose.
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    (Original post by jamesman13)
    its definately left, but only becuase the European Union is a socialist structure.
    I think Michael Foot and Ted Heath would've disagreed with that.
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    (Original post by Salazar)
    I think Michael Foot and Ted Heath would've disagreed with that.
    i dont really know why they were against it, perhaps they did care about britain a bit lol

    Delors addressed the British Trade Union Congress, promising that the EC would be a force to require governments to introduce pro-labour legislation. British Prime Minister Thatcher responded with her famous Bruges Speech in September 1988, in which she said that she had not rolled back the frontiers of the state in Britain only to see socialist measures reimposed by Brussels.

    MEH
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    (Original post by jamesman13)
    its definately left, but only becuase the European Union is a socialist structure.
    I haven't seen any EU legislation which has attempted to transfer control of the means of production to the toiling masses.
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    Researching an essay earlier today about the relationship between politics and the media I found this little gem, which may be of interest:

    Belief among senior aides that Blair would have held a referendum on the euro had it not been for the Eurosceptic Murdoch newspapers.

    In his book The Spin Doctor's Diary, Lance Price, Downing Street's former director of communications, portrayed a one-sided relationship hyper-sensitive to Murdoch's whims - including the suggestion that Blair bought the Sun's support in 2001 by promising not to rush into the euro. 'Whenever any really big decisions had to be taken, I had the impression that Murdoch was always looking over Blair's shoulder,' Price says. He recalls constantly 'rushing into the Home Office' because Sun headlines about rising crime or asylum chaos had upset Blair, and says he was left with 'the pretty clear impression' that discussions with the Murdoch camp had dictated the handling of the single currency.

    Without that pressure, would Blair have held the euro referendum he wanted? 'I think if there hadn't been Murdoch there, he would have felt braver and more able to follow his instincts. It was certainly under consideration for early in the second term. The fact that there wasn't one is a credit to Rupert Murdoch rather than to anyone else,' Price said.
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2006....rupertmurdoch
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    clown wing
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    The Euro isn't a left wing thing at all. The left of the Labour party are anti Europe, they have been since the early days of the EEC. Back in 1983 when the Labour party was at its most left wing they wanted full withdrawal from the EEC. Most of the socialist groups support the NO2EU campaign as well, I have certainly never seen any enthusiasm for the Euro from the left.

    I wouldn't say the Euro is a straightforward left/right issue although the supporters all seem to be centrists, the Lib Dems are the only party who have been pro Euro. You had figures on the right of the Labour party like Tony Blair, Peter Mandleson, who were pro Euro, and then figures to the left of the Conservative party like Ken Clarke and Michael Hestletine.

    Mostly within Europe its the centre-right who like the idea of the Euro. In terms of economic left and right the idea of a common currency is more of a free-market thing, but a lot of the free-marketers in British politics don't want the Euro because they want to preserve the independence of UK monetary policy. Mrs Thatcher was free-market oriented but she abhorred the idea of a common currency because she knew there were too many issues that meant a common currency couldn't work in Europe, in the way that it does in the UK.

    The UK is a common currency zone and the free-marketers would support that rather than breaking England, N Ireland, Scotland, Wales into separate currencies.
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    It's definitely not left wing, and I wouldn't say it's right wing either.

    Most Europhiles are social democrats and centrists.
 
 
 
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