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Bought something with error in price. What are my rights? watch

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    I noticed an item online off a large reputable store for £10 instead of its RRP of £800. It's obviously an error but I've ordered it anyway.

    I'm assuming if they notice the error it's within their rights to cancel the order? What happens if they send the item and take payment though? Is the item legally mine?

    N.B. I wish I could give the link but if 30 more people find it from the link then it makes them actually noticing the error more likely. Sorry
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    Something similar happened with Tesco and its online pricing for a variety of things.

    They just cancelled the orders and promptly refunded the payments to the people.
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    IF it arrives it is yours.
    BUT this happens all the time and the order just gets cancelled.
    They re under no legal requirement to honour the erroneous price.
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    (Original post by hypocriticaljap)
    IF it arrives it is yours.
    BUT this happens all the time and the order just gets cancelled.
    They re under no legal requirement to honour the erroneous price.
    This.


    Same thing happened on amazon with ipods last year, loads of people bought a 64gb touch for £8. All the orders got cancelled.
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    You've made an offer to buy at this point - if they take payment however - they could be deemed to have accepted it - that's what I'd be arguing anyway.
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    I've worked as customer service for a large company and all I can say is this:

    1. If the point of sale was advertised clearly and you have accepted that price there is an immediate contract that is honourable and can be argued on your behalf

    2. If the item has been sent in the post they cannot retract it as they has agreed to the contract

    3. Plus, there was a case about this a few years ago where a flight was sold at the wrong price due to a typo on the website - verdict? The price paid for was honoured and the company went without

    Its all about advertisment and also the vavourite mantra 'the customer is always right'
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    If you get it, its yours, but until then they have every right to retract the price, due to the fact it is such a massive, possibly "unreasonable" discount.
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    It's now quite well established that in online sales the contract forms when the item is delivered, not when it's bought online, but you should check the T&C of the website you're buying from.
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    (Original post by ed_jnr)
    I noticed an item online off a large reputable store for £10 instead of its RRP of £800. It's obviously an error but I've ordered it anyway.

    I'm assuming if they notice the error it's within their rights to cancel the order? What happens if they send the item and take payment though? Is the item legally mine?

    N.B. I wish I could give the link but if 30 more people find it from the link then it makes them actually noticing the error more likely. Sorry
    Link us so we can all buy it too!
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    On a side note, if you buy in store and it lists the wrong price then they do have a legal obligation to sell at that price, false advertising and all that applies much more.
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    PM me it please :P

    I know that in shops that they have to sell it at the price that was advertised. But they have the right to, obviously change the price immediately after.
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    (Original post by Charliemh)
    I've worked as customer service for a large company and all I can say is this:

    1. If the point of sale was advertised clearly and you have accepted that price there is an immediate contract that is honourable and can be argued on your behalf

    2. If the item has been sent in the post they cannot retract it as they has agreed to the contract

    3. Plus, there was a case about this a few years ago where a flight was sold at the wrong price due to a typo on the website - verdict? The price paid for was honoured and the company went without

    Its all about advertisment and also the vavourite mantra 'the customer is always right'
    Actually, you are pretty wrong.
    In terms of the contract, it depends on the actual terms of the website. Amazon IIRC doesn't accept that you are entered into a contract until they email you saying the item has been dispatched. So until that happens, if the mistake is obviously a mistake (as is the case with the OP) then the shop is not obliged to sell you it at the cheaper price.

    I don't think that applies if the mistake isn't obvious (so say the price is £750 instead of £850, then you can argue that isn't obvious that it is a mistake). And I'm sure if the shop doesn't correct it right away you could argue false advertising.

    And obviously if you actually recieve the item then it is yours.

    (Original post by Miss.Boo)
    PM me it please :P

    I know that in shops that they have to sell it at the price that was advertised. But they have the right to, obviously change the price immediately after.
    See above.
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    In a shop if somthing is marked as a price on the shelf, it has to be sold to you at this price. not sure about online though
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    (Original post by Charliemh)
    I've worked as customer service for a large company and all I can say is this:

    1. If the point of sale was advertised clearly and you have accepted that price there is an immediate contract that is honourable and can be argued on your behalf

    2. If the item has been sent in the post they cannot retract it as they has agreed to the contract

    3. Plus, there was a case about this a few years ago where a flight was sold at the wrong price due to a typo on the website - verdict? The price paid for was honoured and the company went without

    Its all about advertisment and also the vavourite mantra 'the customer is always right'
    I don't think that's correct (well, at least your first point). If a company has made a mistake they do not have to honour it. It is not a contract of any type. (This is what I was told when working as a sales assistant anyway).

    I'm not sure what the law would say about when the latest point at which they can withdraw is. Perhaps someone more knowledgeable could clear that up for us. :dontknow:


    Many companies do just act in good faith to the customer and honour the price, but they don't have to. I recently managed to get an £80 coat for £26.68 (bit of a barmy mispricing there), but this is purely the at the manager's discretion.
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    (Original post by Dec S 92)
    In a shop if somthing is marked as a price on the shelf, it has to be sold to you at this price. not sure about online though
    Hmm that's a common belief which many shops do honour, but that's not actually the case at all. They by no means have to sell it to you.
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    (Original post by fliss_pop)
    On a side note, if you buy in store and it lists the wrong price then they do have a legal obligation to sell at that price, false advertising and all that applies much more.

    (Original post by Dec S 92)
    In a shop if somthing is marked as a price on the shelf, it has to be sold to you at this price. not sure about online though
    They don't. Have a read up on "invitation to treat" case law. Same applies in physical shops and online - if price is wrong, they're under no obligation to sell it to you.
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    (Original post by Sync)
    They don't. Have a read up on "invitation to treat" case law. Same applies in physical shops and online - if price is wrong, they're under no obligation to sell it to you.
    Hmmm I now feel a bit bad about telling countless sales assistants they can't charge me more than the sticker price. Generally though I do find retail assistants not highly up to date on the intricacies of contract law, so blagging it is always worth a shot.
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    (Original post by fliss_pop)
    Hmmm I now feel a bit bad about telling countless sales assistants they can't charge me more than the sticker price. Generally though I do find retail assistants not highly up to date on the intricacies of contract law, so blagging it is always worth a shot.
    I do this all the time, even though I've been aware that its incorrect for a while.
    Start talking about statuary rights, the sale of goods act and trading standards and they'll give you whatever you want. It's quite fun exploiting other people's ignorance :P
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    (Original post by fliss_pop)
    Hmmm I now feel a bit bad about telling countless sales assistants they can't charge me more than the sticker price. Generally though I do find retail assistants not highly up to date on the intricacies of contract law, so blagging it is always worth a shot.
    Blagging is always worth a go!
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    (Original post by Boobies.)
    I do this all the time, even though I've been aware that its incorrect for a while.
    Start talking about statuary rights, the sale of goods act and trading standards and they'll give you whatever you want. It's quite fun exploiting other people's ignorance :P
    Agreed. Mentioning any of those will scare them into doing what you want. However, most of the time at stores with more expensive items they'll get the store manager who usually knows his/her stuff about trading standards but at supermarkets etc it often works

    It happened with Asda. They were advertising crates of lager and cider online for £2.34 per crate so my father ordered 20 of them and they turned up then my father told me about it and I tried to order 20 but they sent an email of apology to say that it was due to an error on their system and that they would refund my card. I ended up going half with my dad and having 10 crates of lager for £23.40.
 
 
 
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