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Confused about posterior pelvic tilt and it's relation to hip flexors Watch

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    Like I said in another thread I think I have a sway back posture with posterior pelvic tilt. However I am confused since I figure my hip flex-ors are really tight preventing me reaching enough hip depth to dead-lift conventionally. On the net it states that posterior pelvic tilt is characterised by lax hip flex-ors, which is obviously not true in my case. There is also the possibility I might be confused exactly where the hip flex-ors are but I believe them to be at the top of the thigh, near the v-shape in your groin. As far as I can tell they are fully contracted when the pelvis is forward and relaxed when the pelvis is pushed backwards- confusing . I've got this crazy idea of using a cricket ball to sort of foam roll them!

    For some reason my siblings seem to be able to body weight squat with a narrow stance, feet pointing forward, ass to grass with out any problem despite them never performing any exercise- my older brother looks like a walking coat hanger LOL

    I can just about reach enough hip depth to do semi-sumo dead-lifts but I am extremely weak when performing these (i.e weak in some other muscle in the hip that stabilises the body when the legs are out wide)- in fact it doesn't feel particularly great when at the bottom and if I hold a bodyweight squat, with the legs out fairly wide and the toes pointing out at a large angle, something in my hips doesn't feel great and I kinda walk funny afterwards when I get up.

    Other things that may be connected is that when benching I can't get much of an arch and usually loose any arch that I did get after a few reps- in fact it doesn't really matter if I have my feet of the ground or on the ground.

    Any way, does anyone know what might be happening with my body posture and what to do? The scary thing is that most people will say that my deadlift form looks fine (even those in the uni power-lifting club). So I got this guy (he spends his life literally rolling on the ground) in my gym to check my posture and he said that I wouldn't believe how rounded my lower back was at the starting position. So he got me to lay down on this foam roller, along my back, with my feet on the ground or summit and tested to see if he could get his hand under my lower-back, which he couldn't. So he then said that my lower back is thus flat.
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    Hip flexors flex the hip. They should be contracted when the hip is flexed and relaxed when the hip is extended. If they are too tight they result in anterior pelvic tilt. Tight hip flexors shouldn't cause the deadlift problem you're describing.

    You can't have both swayback and a flat back. The hand thing suggests that it's not swayback, but it's probably easier for you to clarify than for me to guess. You may want to consider the possibility that there's nothing particularly wrong with your posture.

    There might not be anything particularly wrong with your ability to deadlift if most people say your form is ok. If you have a suitable mirror (or a webcam), try getting in to deadlift position shirtless, tightening up your back and checking if it's rounded. You want it to look something like this. Squats can cause some issues, so it's probably best to work out whether you can deadlift first.
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    What I mean by sway back is a flat back posture where the torso is leaning backwards, giving an illusion of a lordic curve but in fact there is really loss of lumbar curvature. Such as here http://www.pt.ntu.edu.tw/hmchai/kine...ingposture.htm

    There seems to be some confusion on the net to exactly what they mean by sway back as some just interchange it with lordosis

    I've tried stretching my hamstrings but its made no difference (except for the fact I can now put my hands on the floor while keeping my legs straight)

    I see the conventional dead lift as narrow squat but with the hips higher. I checked my form in the mirror and I can see that my lower back is obviously rounded at the starting position. From the lowest position I can get my hips, if I straighten my back I can only grab whatever is just below my knees, so the extra depth has to come from rounding from the lower back which isn't a good thing. It should also be noted that rounding my back doesn't allow me to get my hips lower, it just allows me to grab the bar. Its really the same thing when squatting, accept I can just about reach parallel but this is only because my toes are pointed out at more than 45 degrees.
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    OK, sorry. The first few results I found all went for swayback=hyperlordosis.

    Tight glutes would seem to explain a rounding of the back when deadlifting.

    Presumably you've already found several general guides like this one. I'm not at all qualified to suggest things (though I have had posture and flexibility issues before), but I'm going to do so anyway. Don't deadlift (yet), but do strengthen your back with hyperextensions or something. You might want to consider rack pulls. Isolation glute stretches are probably a good idea. I found the "third world squat" (just to warn you, T NATION has pictures of half-naked bodybuilders) very useful for gaining the hip mobility to squat. It should help with the deadlift as well, though as it's not an isolation stretch it might stretch your back too much. Squats and leg presses are also good for hip mobility if you can go deep enough.
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    Update( not that anyone reads this sh*t)

    Well I've decided I have been wrong about my pelvic tilt. The reason I thought I was posterior pelvic titled is that the guy said my back was flat and that my hips feel weak at the bottom of a squat.

    After much confusement and more reading and research, I've decided I have anterior pelvic tilt. Its actually quite simple to see now, especially when naked, the relationship between my hips, back and stomach. Also I tried the 'wall' test, which is where u simply stand against a wall with your butt, back and head against it and feet 6 inches away and observe the distance between your back and the wall. Since there was quite a large between my lower back and the wall I don't think I have a flat back.

    So why am I weak at the bottom of the squat? Well I think its because my hip flex-ors are under too much stretch to reach the depth needed, so I guess any muscle which is under enough stretch is gunna be weak.

    Anyway there is a great t-nation link here http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_..._force_couples

    So I guess all I have to do is stretch them pesky hips, do some Romanian deadlifts (glutes and hammies) (even though powerlifter thinks they're for pussies but better to do them with good form than destroy my spine doing conventional with bad form) and strengthen them abs
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    The vast majority of people have hip flexors that are too tight. Most people have tight hammies/tight hips in general. Try bulgarian split squats with the bottom position held for time with an emphasis on staying vertical. That and 'prying' if you can get hold of bands.
 
 
 
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