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    I'm 16, but my birthday is not until August, so I can't start learning to drive until at least then, which probably means I wouldn't be able to actually drive until at least the end of the year at the earliest. I'll almost certainly be going to university in 2012, so I'm just wondering whether it is actually worth learning to drive. I don't have any money (or a job), my parents certainly can't afford to pay for a car or insurance, plus I'd need money for petrol. Even if I were to find a job, at this age insurance will be ridiculously expensive, plus I'd have to pay for a car, maintenance, MOT, insurance, my provisional license... so much stuff. In addition I'm not particularly interested in cars and I know nothing about them.

    All of my friends are now learning to drive, and it just seems like something that you're expected to do aged 17. It's not that I don't want to learn to drive, I'm just not sure whether it's really worth it. Would having a car be useful when I go off to university? Do you think it's worth saving up some money now, or is having a car at this age unnecessary and overly expensive?
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    I learned to drive before uni, and I haven't driven since. I guess it depends what uni you go to but there really isn't much point having a car where I am. It's a useful skill to have for later life though, some jobs require you to have a driving license. I'm glad I've passed my test because it's something which I won't have to think about doing after uni when I'll have more debt etc. Worth doing IMO.
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    You don't have to have a car if you learn to drive. I learned when I was 17, purely so I don't have to bother learning when I leave university and other stuff gets in the way eg looking for a job or whatever.
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    (Original post by lukas1051)
    I'm 16, but my birthday is not until August, so I can't start learning to drive until at least then, which probably means I wouldn't be able to actually drive until at least the end of the year at the earliest. I'll almost certainly be going to university in 2012, so I'm just wondering whether it is actually worth learning to drive. I don't have any money (or a job), my parents certainly can't afford to pay for a car or insurance, plus I'd need money for petrol. Even if I were to find a job, at this age insurance will be ridiculously expensive, plus I'd have to pay for a car, maintenance, MOT, insurance, my provisional license... so much stuff. In addition I'm not particularly interested in cars and I know nothing about them.

    All of my friends are now learning to drive, and it just seems like something that you're expected to do aged 17. It's not that I don't want to learn to drive, I'm just not sure whether it's really worth it. Would having a car be useful when I go off to university? Do you think it's worth saving up some money now, or is having a car at this age unnecessary and overly expensive?

    if you can afford it...as it is very exspensive. im learning atm and kind of wish i didn't as (including tests) if i pass first time i would have spent about £800 cars are also very exspensive to run. but it may give u better job oppotunities. as thats why i decided to learn.
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    I started driving last summer and passed last weekend. I'm going to university this year hopefully and i'm not planning on getting a car. It's just a useful skill and you won't have to worry about it later on, when you may not have the time.
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    What is the point of learning to do something which you won't do for a good few years or even in your case, till you get a job?

    I would rather dish in another £200 and put the £800 worth of learning to drive into an ISA or even better, a halifax reward account which is currently offering £60 back and with quidco, another £50, you can get back £110 just for investing that money in a bank. Invest your money wisely in this economic climate.
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    The earlier the better.
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    Chicks love being driven around in my judemobile :sexface:
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    You can learn to drive and then not bother getting a car until you have the money for it, that is what I did. It might seem a bit strange but it is better to get things like learning to drive out of the way while you are still young because the longer you wait the more likely it is to never bother learning. And it really is worth it in the long run, having a car is really quite liberating.
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    (Original post by lukas1051)
    I'm 16, but my birthday is not until August, so I can't start learning to drive until at least then, which probably means I wouldn't be able to actually drive until at least the end of the year at the earliest. I'll almost certainly be going to university in 2012, so I'm just wondering whether it is actually worth learning to drive. I don't have any money (or a job), my parents certainly can't afford to pay for a car or insurance, plus I'd need money for petrol. Even if I were to find a job, at this age insurance will be ridiculously expensive, plus I'd have to pay for a car, maintenance, MOT, insurance, my provisional license... so much stuff. In addition I'm not particularly interested in cars and I know nothing about them.

    All of my friends are now learning to drive, and it just seems like something that you're expected to do aged 17. It's not that I don't want to learn to drive, I'm just not sure whether it's really worth it. Would having a car be useful when I go off to university? Do you think it's worth saving up some money now, or is having a car at this age unnecessary and overly expensive?
    It's worth just getting it over with. I waited until a few months ago, when I should really have learned 5 years ago. You need to get a car at some point, and if your parents will pay for lessons, all the better.
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    Living in London I never bothered.

    I will now however as getting the train all the time is annoying. Another factor is the cost...which is definitely draining as my parents don't drive and can't teach me.
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    I passed 2 months ago. The cost of all the lessons, theory and practical is tiny compared to insurance. I am struggling at the minute to find a decent quote for my age (19). I'm going to check if the quotes will be cheaper if I become a second driver on my brothers policy. But say you did take lessons and you pass, the longer you have a license the cheaper the insurance will be, so if you pass this month for example and you don't drive until 2 years later, your insurance will drop significantly due to you having a clean license with NCB
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    (Original post by lukas1051)
    I'm 16, but my birthday is not until August, so I can't start learning to drive until at least then, which probably means I wouldn't be able to actually drive until at least the end of the year at the earliest. I'll almost certainly be going to university in 2012, so I'm just wondering whether it is actually worth learning to drive. I don't have any money (or a job), my parents certainly can't afford to pay for a car or insurance, plus I'd need money for petrol. Even if I were to find a job, at this age insurance will be ridiculously expensive, plus I'd have to pay for a car, maintenance, MOT, insurance, my provisional license... so much stuff. In addition I'm not particularly interested in cars and I know nothing about them.

    All of my friends are now learning to drive, and it just seems like something that you're expected to do aged 17. It's not that I don't want to learn to drive, I'm just not sure whether it's really worth it. Would having a car be useful when I go off to university? Do you think it's worth saving up some money now, or is having a car at this age unnecessary and overly expensive?
    A car isnt really necessary for uni. But i would learn to drive now- then at least you know how to drive, and think about getting a car when you finish uni. Insurance wont be so expensive then either as you are older. And hopefully you will be working full time to pay for a car/insurance/tax etc. I think its easier to learn while you are younger than when you get older.
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    (Original post by berryboysh)
    I passed 2 months ago. The cost of all the lessons, theory and practical is tiny compared to insurance. I am struggling at the minute to find a decent quote for my age (19). I'm going to check if the quotes will be cheaper if I become a second driver on my brothers policy. But say you did take lessons and you pass, the longer you have a license the cheaper the insurance will be, so if you pass this month for example and you don't drive until 2 years later, your insurance will drop significantly due to you having a clean license with NCB
    Yes you will have a clean licence if you dont drive for a while after passing your test- but you dont actually get no claims bonus unless you actually have car and the car insurance which you havent claimed on.
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    I would say that you should at least learn to drive and get it out of the way when you are young. I started learning on my 17th birthday and have been driving nearly 2 years now, unlike my aunt who left it until she was 35 and is still learning at 38, her driving instructers will have made a killing of her so you should not let that happen to you.
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    I learned in sixth form and don't regret it, but I don't have a car now and haven't driven for almost two years. I probably won't drive for at least another two (one more year of uni, one year of setting myself up in a home once I leave) but I'll still have all the skills, it will just be a question of refreshing them, so I don't regret learning. Learning to drive is only going to get more expensive, so I would do it now, even though I would never recommend bringing a car to uni since you'll just become a taxi service to your friends. It'll be one less (very expensive!) thing to do once you leave university and when you start driving you'll probably have lower premiums because you'll be over 21.

    Basically - it couldn't hurt, and it can be fun sometimes!
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    I tried to apply for some jobs on my gap year that required a driving licence, for me not a problem, but when I delved further they require you to have had a licence for 3 years, more of a problem. At least by the time I leave Uni I will have had my licence for more than 3 years, in fact 5 means that these jobs would then be available to me if I still want them, or at least I wouldn't be restricted for that reason.
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    (Original post by Emma:-))
    Yes you will have a clean licence if you dont drive for a while after passing your test- but you dont actually get no claims bonus unless you actually have car and the car insurance which you havent claimed on.

    This is ****ing my head up. (sorry) So if I don't drive for say a year, when i go to get insured after a year I won't have any NCB even though i have held a license without any claims or losses within 12 months? I'm hoping to become a second on me brothers policy in the next month or 2 anyways but not sure yet
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    (Original post by berryboysh)
    This is ****ing my head up. (sorry) So if I don't drive for say a year, when i go to get insured after a year I won't have any NCB even though i have held a license without any claims or losses within 12 months? I'm hoping to become a second on me brothers policy in the next month or 2 anyways but not sure yet
    You dont actually earn any no claims bonus unless you have car insurance to earn it on. You would still have a clean licence with no convictions on though which looks good and as you get older your insurance shouldnt be as expencive (with younger drivers anyway).
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    I had a similar problem, I started learning last July and I passed the test last monday, so it means I'm only gonna have around 6 months of driving before I leave for university. It's a lot of money but it's worth it, it's a great feeling to drive and it'll be more hassle if you learn after university.

    Your parents can put you down as a named driver on their car and it reduces the car insurance a little, it when you get your own policy that you pay loads. Of course that means if you crash or something it affects your parent's insurance and causes that to go up, but you should be driving carefully anyway.

    I know a boy who is the 4th named driver on his family car, he pays quite a low amount in car insurance. But even if you didn't go that way I'd recommend just learning anyway. It gives you a degree of freedom as well, you can just get in the car and go where you like.
 
 
 

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