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    (Original post by I<3LAMP)
    I'm applying next year :pierre:... providing the UKCAT is alright of course.
    Good choice! :penguinhug:

    Are you going to go for A100 or A101?

    Or maybe both? :beard:
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    (Original post by Penguinsaysquack)
    Good choice! :penguinhug:

    Are you going to go for A100 or A101?

    Or maybe both? :beard:
    I'm honestly not sure. I'm tempted by A101 but it may be a little risky with my past track record.

    I'll be asking you for tips though...if you don't mind.
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    (Original post by Hennnaa)
    Yeah, I don't think I could get higher than a C if I took maths, and that's if I work hard...I think AS next year would be okay, just don't know what to choose...there's also the whole doing an AS in gujarati outside of school that would make life much easier! (I just don't know how to go about doing it!:confused: :confused: )

    Yeah I figured the grad med would be a complete last resort if I don't get the grades I need this year (that would require some deathly illness/accident to stop me working and getting the A's) still going to put a biomed course as a fifth option, just in case but I'm hopeful of at least one offer next year!

    Also, how would you recommend revising for the BMAT/UKCAT ? I need to ace these to show that I'm a good enough candidate because my GCSEs ar eso rubbish! (they meet the minimum for the uni's I want to apply to, but they are far from good!)
    I just found out about doing Gujarati as a GCSE like 6 months ago, so I asked my school's examinations' officer and she said to call up Hendon School (as my school doesn't do that anymore).

    Now I've got a speaking exam on Tuesday 26th April (this time next week) and I haven't prepared one bit

    FML

    Having said that, I'm pretty good at Gujarati so hopefully I can bullsh*t my way through
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    (Original post by I<3LAMP)
    I'm honestly not sure. I'm tempted by A101 but it may be a little risky with my past track record.

    I'll be asking you for tips though...if you don't mind.
    I say go for both

    Yeah I don't mind
    Though by october I could be a bit useless about admissions.. especially after/during freshers fortnight :cheers:
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    (Original post by Hennnaa)
    They're kinda forcing me to drop it...(even at this point when we've practically finished the syllabus) I can get my three A's this year and if I put my all into in, 3 A's next year, also, would I still be able to apply while I'm still doing an AS (talked to QMUL, they said both AS & A2's need to be completed in a 2 year period) would they count it as a fourth AS? I don't think they'll make offers including it (e.g. AAAb or something...)
    Yes, you can do a fourth AS in year 13 - just remember to include it on your UCAS form!
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    I'm currently in the 2011 application cycle so I'm familiar with the type of grades the universities look for in a prospective medical student. I think it's not just a case of if you meet the grade requirements but rather how you rank among your competition. Remember theres hardly been a year where medicine wasn't flooded with candidates, tough decisions need to be made by the admissions team and that means they expect the best of the best (you'll find almost all the med candidates offer this)!! Students I've been competing against I know have had very high GCSE grades and have done at least 4 AS levels. The academics come first, then comes everything else (PS, extra curricular, work exp.) Just something you should think about too .
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    (Original post by I<3LAMP)
    I'm applying next year :pierre:... providing the UKCAT is alright of course.



    Hello fellow reapplicant!

    Tis weird..an admissions cycle has just ended and we are already thinking about the next. Well, it is called a cycle after all.
    Hellooo

    I know right - it does seem a bit wierd! I was trying to avoid thinking about it before the last one ended, but that failed :P I ended up planning for the worst
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    (Original post by Glee)
    I'm currently in the 2011 application cycle so I'm familiar with the type of grades the universities look for in a prospective medical student. I think it's not just a case of if you meet the grade requirements but rather how you rank among your competition. Remember theres hardly been a year where medicine wasn't flooded with candidates, tough decisions need to be made by the admissions team and that means they expect the best of the best (you'll find almost all the med candidates offer this)!! Students I've been competing against I know have had very high GCSE grades and have done at least 4 AS levels. The academics come first, then comes everything else (PS, extra curricular, work exp.) Just something you should think about too .
    I'm honestly not sure that grades do make that much difference. The thing is, A level grades don't really mean much at all in the grander scale of things, as you say, they are flooded with candidates, and all those candidates will have good grades. That does not help admissions one bit. What does shine through would be things that show yourself - the way you interview, the way you write a personal statement. First year medicine everywhere rapidly outstrips A levels, so I don't think they are really used as a powerful discriminator. The evidence for my argument is look at how universities and medical schools have introduced their own tests ontop of the A level system, to do exactly this.

    Medics are fairly bright, as a generalisation; but to study medicine you don't have to be bright. The more 'brightness' you have just means you get through the material ffaster so you can spend your time doing other things which keep you sane.

    Edit: Just to clarify, I am not trying to demean A levels. They do require a fair bit of work - more work than most students have ever done at 17 - hence the challenge. But things have to be weighed up depending on the level that you are at. Just as a 5M swimming badge might have been good at say age, 2, it is no longer so impressive at age 4. When you get to medical school, the slate is again wiped clean. Everyone is learning new material and after the first couple of weeks (where they usually run some sort of foundations course). You go on to get what you do based on your own merits. You should also take into account that because of different schools teaching slightly different A levels, to differing standards, grades may not reflect ability as much as teaching, and poor teaching will not stretch bright students. Look u Carl Gauss and Galois, or Hermite to prove the point...
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    (Original post by Wangers)
    I'm honestly not sure that grades do make that much difference. The thing is, A level grades don't really mean much at all in the grander scale of things, as you say, they are flooded with candidates, and all those candidates will have good grades. That does not help admissions one bit. What does shine through would be things that show yourself - the way you interview, the way you write a personal statement. First year medicine everywhere rapidly outstrips A levels, so I don't think they are really used as a powerful discriminator. The evidence for my argument is look at how universities and medical schools have introduced their own tests ontop of the A level system, to do exactly this.
    I stand by my belief that scoring highly in the acamdemics is the first and foremost accolade. Its the fundamental of receiving an offer in the first place and for reading medicine. Of course other things shine through, I didnt say otherwise. But those are secondary and are judged for the sake of elimination. Oversimplifying the subtext of my statement: without the grades, forget APPLYING for medicine.
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    (Original post by Glee)
    I stand by my belief that scoring highly in the acamdemics is the first and foremost accolade. Its the fundamental of receiving an offer in the first place and for reading medicine. Of course other things shine through, I didnt say otherwise. But those are secondary and are judged for the sake of elimination. Oversimplifying the subtext of my statement: without the grades, forget APPLYING for medicine.
    Yes, and my point is that universities do use grades, but only to establish a basic bar so that they can set the minimum standards of the people they talk to.

    If anyone is truely brilliant in academics in any science - I sincerly urge them to think seriously about abandoning medicine and making a substantial contribution of 'basic' research science. The world will sing your praises for far longer and far louder than for any doctor.

    Grades are used for elimination, but dependent on the rest. So, a good PS, reference may save an application. A piss poor personal statement will probably bin the application, regardless of grades, because grades are not special - many people have them.

    I tell you honestly, I know some of the brightest in the year, those who will (and yes, I do have some bets on) be the greatest of a generation. They were given BBB offers. Why? Because the A level system is to them meaningless. It came nowhere close to taxing their true intellectual potential. To be honest, I don't think pre-clinical medicine does either.
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    (Original post by Hennnaa)
    and a third statement...could just apply to biomed this year then try grad med?
    Only as a backup if you fall massively short of your grades. If you end up with AAB/ABB then resit, a fair few uni's accept resits. Grad med is much difficult o get onto than as a school- leaver, you're competing against a whole different kettle of fish. Unfortunately a lot of people think having a degree guarantees you a place, and it really doesn't.
    Also grad med is expensive, and it's not going to be a feasible option financially for many people anymore considering the tuition fees rise. Unless you have 40-50k lying around, i'd think twice.

    (Original post by Jabbo12)
    OK but bear in mind that med schools only accept top 2 people in the class of biomed per university
    (Original post by Jabbo12)
    You need to come top of the class
    Not true at all. The 4 out of about 40 applicants in my year who gained offers aren't top of the class, they're on standard 2i's. Actually, my housemate who is on a very high 1st (averaging ~80) was rejected from all 4 choices w/o interview, and it's not like her PS was a load of crap either, her profile's pretty impressive.

    Very few med schools focus mainly on grades, at grad level it's mostly about your PS.




    OP- If it's of any use I had 3 AS first time round (well it was technically 4, but I had human bio and normal bio so it doesn't really count) and I got interviews and offers. Although this was a few years ago and things have changed, you should be fine.
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    (Original post by Penguinsaysquack)
    I say go for both

    Yeah I don't mind
    Though by october I could be a bit useless about admissions.. especially after/during freshers fortnight :cheers:
    Nah I meant about Barts-The course & Uni. The only reason I didn't apply last year was because my UKCAT score was so low.

    I'll have to see after the UKCAT how many choices I have!
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    (Original post by I<3LAMP)
    Nah I meant about Barts-The course &amp; Uni. The only reason I didn't apply last year was because my UKCAT score was so low.

    I'll have to see after the UKCAT how many choices I have!
    Ahh I see

    Yeah you show that UKCAT who's boss and I'll try to help out :penguinhug:
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    (Original post by Penguinsaysquack)
    Ahh I see

    Yeah you show that UKCAT who's boss and I'll try to help out :penguinhug:
    Heh Heh Heh... I'll try

    and thanks! :hugs:
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    (Original post by Hennnaa)
    Where do you think I can apply with 3 AS Levels?
    Maybe somewhere like Brighton and Sussrx? or Liverpool perhaps?
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    (Original post by SamHey789)
    Maybe somewhere like Brighton and Sussrx? or Liverpool perhaps?
    Nope, Liverpool want four at a minimum.
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    (Original post by planetconwy1)
    Nope, Liverpool want four at a minimum.
    What about Brighton and Sussex then, they seem pretty leniant
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    (Original post by SamHey789)
    What about Brighton and Sussex then, they seem pretty leniant
    Most standard offers for entry to BSMS are conditional on gaining 360 UCAS points in three A-levels, following the study of at least four subjects to AS-level. These points may be achieved by obtaining AAA or A*AB at A-level, but both Biology and Chemistry must have been studied to A-level and passed with a minimum A grade.

    -from their website.
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    (Original post by Hennnaa)
    Where do you think I can apply with 3 AS Levels?
    Keele.
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    (Original post by planetconwy1)
    Most standard offers for entry to BSMS are conditional on gaining 360 UCAS points in three A-levels, following the study of at least four subjects to AS-level. These points may be achieved by obtaining AAA or A*AB at A-level, but both Biology and Chemistry must have been studied to A-level and passed with a minimum A grade.

    -from their website.
    Ah, my bad.
 
 
 
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