Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Tetanus)
    Nope, haha!

    Could still come up though! Imagine if it did!? Would catch out so many people! :ninja:
    I think I'll leave it out in that case. But yes if it comes up I will diee and I still have all of Sliding fillament model to do ahh
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hellosarah)
    no seriously, action potential....what the hell happens?
    depends if u mean neuromuscular junction or synapse?

    synapse is neurone to neurone, action potential arrives at the presynaptic membrane , calcium ions open and calcium causes vesicles usually containing acetylcholine to move to and fuse with the presynaptic knob. the acetylcholine is released via exocytosis and crosses over the cleft. the binding sites on teh post synaptic membrane causes sodium channels to open which carries on teh action potential in this neurone

    in the neuromuscular junction it is similar but the sodium channels open and the post synaptic membrane is also called the sarcolemma. .so depolarisation occurs down t tubules (inner foldings of the sarcolemma) which causes calcium ions to be released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. teh calcium binds to teh troponin on the actin (thin filament) which moves the troponin and tropomyosin away from the binding sites so the power stroke / muscle contractino occurs.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Pwn4g3_P13)
    No kidding - untill i heard about that i was convinced i was in CDE territory ^^
    I need over 119/150 (pretty much 80%) in F215 to get an A overall. Got 80/100 on June 2010. Was livid that I only scraped it!

    Me, on realising UMS is awesome and crazy low = :borat:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Tetanus)
    UMS Grading for January 2011 OCR Modules: BOOM!

    UMS Grading for June 2010 OCR Modules: Reload... BOOM!

    Scroll down to find the Biology Modules, couple of pages down I think..

    :ahee::ahee::ahee:

    So is anything above 120 ums..... full UMS? What's the raw mark for full? I'm a humanities student ....don't get this stuff!



    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ChubbyRain)
    yeah that sounds right to me although I hope this doesnt come up tomorrow lol I think it came up in jun 2010?
    me too, i hope more genetics q's come up instead of biotechnology, its my least favourite!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Bullit)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x5yPkxCLads

    Watching that pretty much guarantees you an A
    :love:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ekta9)
    I think I'll leave it out in that case. But yes if it comes up I will diee and I still have all of Sliding fillament model to do ahh
    The processes like the sliding filament model in F215 I think are much easier than those found in F214 (e.g. Krebs Cycle, Oxidative Phosphorylation etc ...)
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Tetanus)
    I need over 119/150 (pretty much 80%) in F215 to get an A overall. Got 80/100 on June 2010. Was livid that I only scraped it!

    Me, on realising UMS is awesome and crazy low = :borat:
    I'm trying to avoid the whole 'what do i need to get an A' as that would jsut panic me, all i know is as of Jan i have a middling B and i had F211 and F215 to get that to an A - good luck to the both of us ay ^^
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Nadooo)
    So is anything above 120 ums..... full UMS? What's the raw mark for full? I'm a humanities student ....don't get this stuff!



    Anything above 120 UMS = A

    A = 80% of full marks

    80% of 150 = 120

    UMS is a way of grading the exam in terms of difficulty. The harder the exam, the lower the average grades, the lower the UMS boundaries.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Tetanus)
    The processes like the sliding filament model in F215 I think are much easier than those found in F214 (e.g. Krebs Cycle, Oxidative Phosphorylation etc ...)
    Yeah I agree although F214 seems so much more easier compared to this.. which is a good thing as I'll be retaking that. Good luck for tomorrow
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Pwn4g3_P13)
    I'm trying to avoid the whole 'what do i need to get an A' as that would jsut panic me, all i know is as of Jan i have a middling B and i had F211 and F215 to get that to an A - good luck to the both of us ay ^^
    I resat F211 too! How'd you find it!

    GOOD LUCK to you also!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Sorry if this is a stupid question but people keep going on about reverse transcriptase? I don't believe I have come across this name before.
    Is it the same as RNA Polymerase if not could somebody explain what it is/does?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Hey im absolutely freaking out 'cos im scared and 'cos of this one question that keeps coming up..

    Do we need to know about artifical selection/ selective breeding in plants like tomatoes and pollination and cross pollinate etc etc etc? I dont even know what that is! All i know about selective breeding is whats in the book. Someone please tell me thats old spec and we dont need to know it anymore?!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ekta9)
    Yeah I agree although F214 seems so much more easier compared to this.. which is a good thing as I'll be retaking that. Good luck for tomorrow
    And you!

    (NAAAAAAAAAAT! I want UMS to be extra low, hope you fail. )


    edit: This was definitely a joke. Neg crazy fools.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CoventryCity)
    Sorry if this is a stupid question but people keep going on about reverse transcriptase? I don't believe I have come across this name before.
    Is it the same as RNA Polymerase if not could somebody explain what it is/does?
    Main thing you need to know is that RNA polymerase is used in translation. Not artificial. Its the enzyme that catalyses the reaction where free nucleotides bind to the non coding/template strand of DNA.

    Reverse transcriptase (enzyme) is artifical and used in the engineering human insulin into bacteria. The mrna of insulin is extracted right from the beta cells in islets of langerhans. Then the enzyme reverse transcriptase is used to synthesise a COMPLEMENTARY strand to the mrna for insulin producing a strand thats a copy of the dna non coding strand.

    Then DNA nucleotides are joined by complementray base pairing to the newly formed strand

    Hope that clears things
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by rebeccalouise_92)
    .
    i meant the actual process of action potentials, what we did in F214. Like including resting potentials and those voltage gated channels and stuff? :confused:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CoventryCity)
    Sorry if this is a stupid question but people keep going on about reverse transcriptase? I don't believe I have come across this name before.
    Is it the same as RNA Polymerase if not could somebody explain what it is/does?
    It does near enough the opposite of transcription, making cDNA (complementary DNA) out of mRNA, which would be a copy of the gene which the mRNA was first made out of.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CoventryCity)
    Sorry if this is a stupid question but people keep going on about reverse transcriptase? I don't believe I have come across this name before.
    Is it the same as RNA Polymerase if not could somebody explain what it is/does?
    do you have the heinemann text book with the brain scan on the front. when it talks about insulin production it mentions it there. basically when finding the gene they want they can find the mRNA for the gene instead and use reverse transcriptase to reverse the transcription process to make a single template DNA and then double stranded DNA referred to as cDNA.the exaple is that they know the gene for insulin was expressed in b cells of islets of langerhans so collected mRNA from there and reverse transcriptase-d it
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    Could anyone please define 'genetic code' for me please? Don't seem to have it in the textbook :/
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CoventryCity)
    Sorry if this is a stupid question but people keep going on about reverse transcriptase? I don't believe I have come across this name before.
    Is it the same as RNA Polymerase if not could somebody explain what it is/does?
    it is used in gaining the dna for human insulin! because the dna is less than 200 bases long, in a whole genome of 300 m bases it is really small to find. so instead the reverse transcriptase is used to gain the mrna in the b cells of the islets of langerhans and it gets the DNA by reverse transcription as the name statess.

    it is from a group of virus called retro viruses
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Has a teacher ever helped you cheat?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Write a reply...
    Reply
    Hide
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.