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    (Original post by There will be Particles)
    Indeed
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    What did everyone put about the sheep and the seaweed?

    i said it's because they are in such a limited niche with a particular food supply?
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    (Original post by Wor Carroll)
    For the question about the 3 stop codons it asked for the triplet code and not the name of the amino acids right....
    They didn't have amino acids, it just said STOP so we couldn't write any amino acids there.
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    (Original post by bshrestha3)
    It's like the nitrogen cycle they bloody gave us!!
    Lol
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    (Original post by thepwince)
    Im surprised you haven't heard of humus? Practically my whole Bio class got over than in GCSE :P And yes it is soil, more specifically the dead organic matter in soil i think.
    I have....but my mind was so blank it wasn't my priority to know what humus was at the time. I mean there were more important things I was thinking about like genetic engineering, apoptosis, lac operon, neuromuscular junctions than stupid humus. LMAO....
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    (Original post by yesioo)
    What did everyone put about the sheep and the seaweed?

    i said it's because they are in such a limited niche with a particular food supply?
    yeah pretty much, since they're prone to copper posioning etc. can't exactly rear them on standard grassy farm, each farmer wishing to rear them would require designated sea shore etc.
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    (Original post by susan23)
    I have....but my mind was so blank it wasn't my priority to know what humus was at the time. I mean there were more important things I was thinking about like genetic engineering, apoptosis, lac operon, neuromuscular junctions than stupid humus. LMAO....
    Haha yeah, who wasnt ? :/
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    it was a tough paper...plenty of tricky Q's

    66-68 for 90% UMS i reckon...

    typical OCR though: plenty of bs Q's to throw you!
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    (Original post by airdoc)
    I put kite diagram for the lady bird thing :-P
    I said do a line graph
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    (Original post by Singh993)
    it was a tough paper...plenty of tricky Q's

    66-68 for 90% UMS i reckon...

    typical OCR though: plenty of bs Q's to throw you!
    so whats the rule for an A* then? Is it 90% raaw or 90% UMS?
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    (Original post by yesioo)
    What did everyone put about the sheep and the seaweed?

    i said it's because they are in such a limited niche with a particular food supply?
    Edit: Nvm, different part.

    (Original post by Medifield)
    Do you mean the question about the ethics of the hedgehogs?
    No. There was a part after the "explain wader population blahblah" that said "Suggest and explain two reasons why the hedgehogs population grew" or something. or have i completely imagined it? ;p
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    Can anyone remember the question about two factors to do with hedgehogs? I swear it had the number four in the question...and I just freaked and wrote about limiting factors :/
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    lol as soon as I saw the nitrogen cycle question i skipped the pages.......to find more ecology...
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    (Original post by lmfw)
    Guys, it WASN'T a particularly hard paper. Basically, we didn't need to revise for it which is the annoying thing. A lot was just application. Don't worry about it, it could have been so much worse!
    Agree with you there cos it was pretty much ALL knowledge and hardly/none synoptic
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    [email protected]

    use and abuse.............
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    very upsetting the amount of revision i put into that. Was expecting a 10 marker on muscle contraction.
    anywhoo...

    I need 70 UMS marks to get a overall C in this paper
    in raw marks that would be 35/100?
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    (Original post by 2141)
    If they lower the grade boundaries for this exam, does that mean they lower it for the whole Alevel grade too ? Otherwise it doesn't make much of a difference.
    No. If they lower the grade boundary then it will scale up more. So you will get a higher UMS score for the same raw marks.


    I personally thought thay exam has wasted the past 2/3 months of revision :/ where was the gene stuff. Gene technology or muscles and nervous system stuff?? I know there was a couple marks on some of it but i was prepared for like 7/8 marks on sequencing a genome :/

    Thanks ocr. :/
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    (Original post by Iheartnerds)
    I go to an insanely academic school, like majority of people are geniuses, and about 4 of them were crying when the exam was finished. Everyone I spoke to put different answers for almost everything, didn't understand what the questions were asking, ran out of time etc. I'm pretty sure if this happened at my school, it would have happened everywhere else. PLEASE GOD, LOW GRADE BOUNDARIES PLEEASE.
    Same. I go to school where 18 students got 80+ UMS in January. Everybody found it hard. This exam paper was something else. I believe no one who says the paper was easy/fine/ok. It wasn't. I got 83/90 in January, I am a Biology veteran and after doing that exam all i want to do is lay in bed...thinking of what could have been.
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    (Original post by Rocks:))
    Can anyone remember the question about two factors to do with hedgehogs? I swear it had the number four in the question...and I just freaked and wrote about limiting factors :/
    If you're talking about what I think you're talking about ...

    I put there was no intraspecific competition, as there were such a large number of prey and a small number of predators. (Loads of waders, only 4 hedgehogs at first).

    and lack of predation. (it was a suggest question). lack of predation meant that the hedgehogs had a higher rate of survival and reproductive success, meaning the population was allowed to increase.
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    1)a) Plant protein - animal protein (3)

    I wrote about how plants get nitrates from soil. Then they use this nitrates to syntesise amino acids which are then converted to proteins. The primary consumer (the sheep) will eat the grass then some of the nitrogenous compounds will be transferred to the animals and produce amino acids then proteins.


    b) Processes that lead to process B (humus) (2)

    I wrote excretion of faeces and explained it
    Next is when they die, decomposers will hydrolyse them etc



    c) How the processes C and D contribute to plant growth (reference to nitrifying bacteria).

    I wrote Nitrobacter or Nitrosomonas :P Then i talked about how they convert ammonia ions to nitrite ions, then nitrite ions to nitrate ions in which the plant can use for growth.


    ?) What plant could the farmer use to restore nitrogen the soil? (2)

    Leguminous plants such as peas. Then talked a bit about what I mentioned about. In addition to them having legumes in their root nodules


    ?) Why rare sheep should be kept in existence (2) Explain why species of those scottish sheep are likely to be extinct in the future

    I dont think they asked this. See my modified q
    I wrote about there's less genetic variation between species.
    Then babbled on allopatric and sympatric speciation



    ?) The two processes involved in allowing sheep to eat seaweed (2)

    Adaptation to the environment
    and there's not much food source available since they were at sea shore, only sea weeds available, sheep are primary consumers.



    ?) The two major problems that cause these sheep to be rare? (2?) why are the genes for these sheep are highly desirable?

    see modified question
    I wrote about how they can use the genes for selective breeding if that particular trait has selective advantage over other organisms. This gene can then be passed onto the next generation



    ?) What are the three stop codons? (1)

    AUG I think.

    ?) Why do stop codons stop translation (or some ****)?

    ooh I forgot to write "truncated proteins" but I wrote about how it shortens the polypeptide this is needed because different proteins need different sizes of polypeptide chain eg in haemoglobin


    ?) What are the other 4 amino acids in the chain?

    Trypotrophan, methionine, forgot the other 2


    ?) Differences between Somatic Cell Therapy and Germline Cell Therapy (2)

    Somatic is insertion of gene into a plasmid. then inserted tot the genome of the organism

    Germline is genetic maniputaion of the embryos



    ?) Differences between PNS and CNS (4)

    CNS - consists of brain and spinal cord. mostly involve in voluntay actions and higher mental processes.

    PNS - consists of somatic and autonomic nervous systems
    Autonomic for fight or flight and relaxation - they work antagonistically



    ?) Differences between Prophase 1 and Prophase 2 (2)

    I got this wrong but the correct answer is that bivalent form in prophase 1 and it doesn't in prophase 2


    ?) Describe and explain what happens to the population of waders after hedgehogs are introduced (6)


    I described the trend, data and pattern using the data
    then i talked about biotic factor of predation and its consequences on waders population



    ?) Percentage decrease of Swipes in area 2 (2)


    got this wrong, hope got a mark for working out


    ?) Advantages of learned and innate behaviour (11)

    This is my favourite basically i talked about a behaviour and its advantages

    innate - kineses - woodlice and reflexes - eathworms
    learned - operant conditioning in dogs and latent learning in lizards when they bask. its quite a long answer.



    ?) Describe the process of tissue culture? (7)

    key words CALLUS, EXPLANT, plant hormones for growth, green house


    ?) Describe a suitable method for the student to measure ladybirds up the hill?

    Got this wrong :P Misread the question

    ?) Explain a more suitable method to list the data collected (frequencies of ladybirds)? (2)


    I said plot a bar graph x axis is the lady birds population and y axis is the altitude.


    ?) The student says, "positive correlation = ladybirds survive better in high altitudes". Is he correct in saying this? (3)

    He's wrong, because I used the trend in the table.


    ?) Work out p and q (hardy weinberg) (2)

    p = 7.01 somthing
    q= 17. something



    ?) Hedgehogs are being trapped and killed. Discuss the ethical implications (3)

    religious people - life is sacred etc
    environmentalists - genetic diversity
    good biological control


    ?) Explain why nearly all the Elm trees were wiped out when the disease hit (3)

    talked about how during vegetative propagation they pass on the dissease to the basal sprouts then this continues then all basal sprouts will have the disease.


    ?) Molecular analysis to show they're clones (1)

    analyse DNA polymerase (RNA polymerase or cytochrome c)


    ?) How do Elm trees produce clones [or something] (1)

    vegetative propagation

    ?) The disease causes the leaves to turn yellow and die. Explain why? (2)

    xylem vessels is for water transport. if blocked not enough water will reach the leaf = less photosynthesis = leaf loss


    ?) How does the root dying cause the leaves to fall? (2?)

    talked about how the soil absorbs nitrates from soil. if dead not much minerals and water transported throguh xylem and phloem to the leaf. = less photosynthesis and growth


    ?) UUU changed to UUA. What mutation is this? (1)


    point or substituion


    ?) Name of the nucleic acide in 5.2 (2)


    RNA is it two marks? :O


    ?) Define innate behaviour (2)

    genetic predisposed, inherited, stereotypical


    ?) Define learned behaviour (2)

    as a result of environment, individualistic



    ?) Define recessive (1)

    require both allele for you to have that phenotype (or is it gene not allele?)


    ?) Suggest and explain (?) two reasons why the hedgehog population increased so much (or something). (4?)

    I wrote about lots of prey, lots of food, use food for growth and reproduction

    second is I wrote about how theres no presence of predators for the hedgehogs, so its easier for hedgehogs to adapt.

    you can also talk about competition.




    WOW im impress thats like the whole paper there.

    Hope this helps some
 
 
 
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