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    (Original post by entertheOJI)
    It not done like this at all, what you have said is just wrong.
    and it is definitely right.. because i have just done it with my cwk mark lol... that is only the correct way of working out the biology cwk mark.. not any other exams.
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    (Original post by wilsea05)
    no its not done like that
    it is! it's how you work out your coursework UMS! teachers have told me lol. x
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    (Original post by Mcfilly)
    and it is definitely right.. because i have just done it with my cwk mark lol... that is only the correct way of working out the biology cwk mark.. not any other exams.
    It's not. The UMS you'll get from your coursework mark changes every year, as it depends how well everyone who sat the practicals has done. I don't think there's a way of working out what you've got, although I may be wrong, but you definitely don't divide your mark by 40 then times it by 60 as you're suggesting. Your actual UMS will probably be lower than what you would get if you did it that way.

    Edit: As an example, I got 30/40 on my coursework last year. If I used your method, 30/40 = .75, .75 x 60 = 45 UMS. I actually got 40 UMS.
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    (Original post by Mcfilly)
    and it is definitely right.. because i have just done it with my cwk mark lol... that is only the correct way of working out the biology cwk mark.. not any other exams.
    nah, you are genuinely wrong mate.
    scroll down to Biology F213 or F216 http://www.ocr.org.uk/download/admin...und_jun_10.pdf

    if you do say i get 34/40 (boundary for an A, raw marks) and then you divide it by 40, and times it by 60 to get 51/60...
    34 scaled up into ACTUAL UMS is 48/60. its more complicated than just 'timesing it by 1.5' as they have to take everyones marks into account
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    (Original post by heartskippedabeat)
    It's not. The UMS you'll get from your coursework mark changes every year, as it depends how well everyone who sat the practicals has done. I don't think there's a way of working out what you've got, although I may be wrong, but you definitely don't divide your mark by 40 then times it by 60 as you're suggesting. Your actual UMS will probably be lower than what you woul get if you did it that way.
    It's true, but it would be a likely rough indicator to be fair.
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    (Original post by Mcfilly)
    it is! it's how you work out your coursework UMS! teachers have told me lol. x
    your teachers are dumb then, and have no idea how raw marks are scaled up...
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    (Original post by heartskippedabeat)
    It's not. The UMS you'll get from your coursework mark changes every year, as it depends how well everyone who sat the practicals has done. I don't think there's a way of working out what you've got, although I may be wrong, but you definitely don't divide your mark by 40 then times it by 60 as you're suggesting. Your actual UMS will probably be lower than what you woul get if you did it that way.
    No i know they have to take peoples marks into account.. but for a rough working out you do it like that, thats how all the teachers do it at my school ..
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    (Original post by Mcfilly)
    No i know they have to take peoples marks into account.. but for a rough working out you do it like that, thats how all the teachers do it at my school ..
    thats still wrong. if you get 32/40 thats 80% raw marks implying you'd get 80% UMS, but actually 32 is just over a B, meaning its about 43/44UMS... as opposed to thinking you'll get 48 UMS.
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    (Original post by wilsea05)
    your teachers are dumb then, and have no idea how raw marks are scaled up...
    :/ I dunno - i know you have to take into account everyones marks and stuff so it is never going to be exact, but as a rough indicator that is the way you do it i think..
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    (Original post by Mcfilly)
    No i know they have to take peoples marks into account.. but for a rough working out you do it like that, thats how all the teachers do it at my school ..
    It will be more or less
    37/40 - 54/60
    34/40 - 48/60
    31/40 - 42/60
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    (Original post by sportycricketer)
    It will be more or less
    37/40 - 54/60
    34/40 - 48/60
    31/40 - 42/60
    cool, thanks
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    Need 136 UMS in this and practical to get the grade I need. I thought getting this would be easier than it's turning out to be, 1 week left and not a single A in a mock.
    Definitely aiming for 95% raw on Monday, not.
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    (Original post by Mcfilly)
    No i know they have to take peoples marks into account.. but for a rough working out you do it like that, thats how all the teachers do it at my school ..
    It doesn't really work for a rough working out though, especially as it gives you a higher UMS than you will actually get, it's much better to underestimate than overestimate.
    But ok, maybe you should have said it was a 'rough' way in the first place, instead of claiming it was how you worked out your exact UMS.

    Ps your teachers are idiots
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    (Original post by heartskippedabeat)
    It doesn't really work for a rough working out though, especially as it gives you a higher UMS than you will actually get, it's much better to underestimate than overestimate.
    But ok, maybe you should have said it was a 'rough' way in the first place, instead of claiming it was how you worked out your exact UMS.

    Ps your teachers are idiots
    lol does it really matter that much? lol someone asked so i gave them the best possible answer? There is no other way of working it out because you don't know how things are going to be moderated ... so that is really the only way you can use and just know that it is only rough...
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    (Original post by Mcfilly)
    lol does it really matter that much? lol someone asked so i gave them the best possible answer? There is no other way of working it out because you don't know how things are going to be moderated ... so that is really the only way you can use and just know that it is only rough...
    It's a much better idea to use the raw mark/ums grde boundries from last years practicals actually, because they shouldn't change significantly and it gives you a much more accurate idea of what UMS you'll get.

    But anyway, I didn't mean to start an arguement, just wanted to clear up that's not an exact way to convert your marks to UMS like your first post suggested, because a lot of people have been asking how to do it and otherwise they might underestimate the amount of marks they need on this paper
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    anybody quick notes on sliding filament theory?
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    (Original post by entertheOJI)
    Downstream processing is a combination of four applied operations that bring penicillin from a fermentation broth and make progressive improvements in its purity and concentration. The four stages are centrifugation, product isolation, product purification and finally product polishing. For example...

    (Question) Why is downstream processing essential in the production of penicillin?

    (Answer) It is used to recover penicillin from the fermenter broth and purify penicillin.

    2 marking points - recover and purify
    i don't remember seeing the 4 stages in the heinemann book or spec?
    • Study Helper
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    (Original post by Rup)
    anybody quick notes on sliding filament theory?
    Just doing this while watching Queen's on TV :awesome:


    From what I understand:

    • Actin is covered in troponin and tropomyosin proteins, preventing myosin heads from binding normally.
    • When the action potential arrives at the sarcomere, calcium ions are released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum.
    • These then bind to the troponin, which changes the shape (non-competitive inhibition :awesome:) and moves the tropomyosin away from the binding sites.
    • Now myosin heads are able to form cross-bridges.
    • The myosin head then bends, bringing the actin with it. This shortens the sarcomere (which is contraction).
    • Since this is now a stable structure, ATP attaches to the myosin head to remove the cross-bridge and so return it to the original position (hydrolysing the ATP into ADP + P).
    • If Calcium ions are still present, the myosin head can attach further along and contract again.
    • The contraction is (apparently) called a Power Stroke.
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    I found this website that's quite useful:

    http://www.biologyguide.net/

    it's designed for AQA, but it's got helpful things like inheritance, variation, genetic engineering and much more
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    (Original post by sillysal)
    i don't remember seeing the 4 stages in the heinemann book or spec?
    I don't think we have to know it - just know that downstream processing is a way to recover and purify the product. No need to know the details as far as I know. Well, I have a page of notes on it, and written in big letters at the top is 'ignore, don't need to know'



    (Original post by fortunecookie)
    Would you guys want to do a revision thread quiz type thing where you write a question and then someone below answers it, writing a new question underneath?
    I would
 
 
 
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