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    (Original post by titchygirl1701)
    What would I do without you lot
    I know exactly, teaching the person whose ACTUALLY taking the quiz themselves :P tut tut. It's a great quiz otherwise . I hadn't heard of Qs 22 and 23 before. Is that in the textbook? lol
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    I predict a hard paper or an easy one.
    the past 2 papers the grade boundaries have been around 60 for an A .. so this one may have also 60 for an A so itll be hard or they could make it normal and 80 for an A.

    I dont like the wording of the questions most of the ones i have done are all ''suggest'', ''explain'' , ''Describe'' Questions.

    Does anyone know what is most likely to come up, Like your teacher may have told you what they think is coming upp ?/
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    I think cellular control is the easiest topic by far. I just need a C in this exam but after how much revision I've done I deserve more than that but it doesn't work like that.

    I'm guessing this paper will be of similar difficulty to previous papers unless they put some horrible long answer questions in (in which case I'm f***** ).

    I would like transcription and translation to come up, meiosis long question, and electrophoresis other than that I just hope for the best. I'm going to concentrate on my other exam on 10th now but shall pursue this later! Although ill be lingering around haha
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    (Original post by mazam)
    I predict a hard paper or an easy one.
    the past 2 papers the grade boundaries have been around 60 for an A .. so this one may have also 60 for an A so itll be hard or they could make it normal and 80 for an A.

    I dont like the wording of the questions most of the ones i have done are all ''suggest'', ''explain'' , ''Describe'' Questions.

    Does anyone know what is most likely to come up, Like your teacher may have told you what they think is coming upp ?/
    Never gonna happen, wouldn't fret too much about the boundaries, the only way it'll ever creep above 70 for an A is if it's ridiculously easy. OCR Biology mark schemes are far too specific for everyone to completely romp any of their papers.
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    With transcription, DNA is unzipped then mRNA bonds to exposed bases and blah blah, but how does the mRNA strand detach from the DNA strand and ultimately leave the nucleus?
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    (Original post by jakehartley123)
    Never gonna happen, wouldn't fret too much about the boundaries, the only way it'll ever creep above 70 for an A is if it's ridiculously easy. OCR Biology mark schemes are far too specific for everyone to completely romp any of their papers.
    I agree with that totally especially considering its A2. It was 77 last year for an A in F212 but that was an AS Module
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    (Original post by wrench22)
    With transcription, DNA is unzipped then mRNA bonds to exposed bases and blah blah, but how does the mRNA strand detach from the DNA strand and ultimately leave the nucleus?
    When a stop codon is reached on the template strand, RNA polymerase will detach itself from the template strand of DNA. This means the mRNA is complete and the mRNA strand dissociates from RNA polymerase and passes through the nuclear pore into the cytoplasm where it attaches to a ribosome ready for translation.
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    (Original post by wrench22)
    With transcription, DNA is unzipped then mRNA bonds to exposed bases and blah blah, but how does the mRNA strand detach from the DNA strand and ultimately leave the nucleus?
    For one mRNA doesnt bind to the exposed bases, RNA nucleotides do. This makes mRNA. mRNA detaches automatically once the whole sequence coding for the protein hs been copied. It then leaves the nucleus via the nucleur pores.
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    (Original post by entertheOJI)
    When a stop codon is reached on the template strand, RNA polymerase will detach itself from the template strand of DNA. This means the mRNA is complete and the mRNA strand dissociates from RNA polymerase and passes through the nuclear pore into the cytoplasm where it attaches to a ribosome ready for translation.
    I thought stop codons where to do with translation and they signify the end of the polypeptide chain.
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    In artifical vegatative propagation do we need to know about grafting and take cuttings?
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    (Original post by slacker07906)
    I thought stop codons where to do with translation and they signify the end of the polypeptide chain.
    stop codons are used is both, otherwise RNA polymerase would transcribe the whole DNA strand not a gene (a section/length of DNA).
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    (Original post by Dunn0)
    In artifical vegatative propagation do we need to know about grafting and take cuttings?
    Nope.
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    (Original post by slacker07906)
    Nope.
    it's in the textbook though?
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    (Original post by greenford)
    I haven't done so much revision for any other exam in my entire life.... hope it all goes well for everyone

    All the hard work will pay off! :work:

    Keep going
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    (Original post by sillysal)
    it's in the textbook though?
    But its not on the specification
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    (Original post by slacker07906)
    But its not on the specification
    whaaat! so i've been trying to learn that for no reason.......fml
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    can someone explain to me that whole antisense strands business? it's to do with PCR, don't quite understand it?
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    I'm starting to really stress out about this now
    6 days to go!
    I hope mitosis, animal behaviour and ecosystems come up, and not muscles or PCR
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    (Original post by titchygirl1701)
    I just made a quiz on this site, you have to sign up to view it but it's free and so worth it!
    I'm going to make more for the other sections
    http://getrevising.co.uk/account/qui...lar_control_a2
    Grr I hate you, are you sure we need to know all that stuff!?! I got 79% but that's shocking imo because a lot of the stuff I had no clue about. We don't need to know homebox sequences in such detail do we? and nitric acid I had no clue lol.. Can people who did this test please reassure me on this or am i doomed?
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