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    (Original post by Dunn0)
    In artifical vegatative propagation do we need to know about grafting and take cuttings?
    In terms of grafting you need to know that is a method of cloning, because when you read about gibberlings you will find that grafting is used to make a dwarf tree tall again,

    and taking cuttings i think you do need to kno about it because on the specification, 5.2.1 part c it says 'describe the production of artiical clones of plants from tissue culture' its also covered in quite a bit of depth in the book,

    but if it isnt on the specification and we dont need to know it, i wont be moaning lol
    However it is in the book so its worth a read
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    (Original post by Killmepls)
    Grr I hate you, are you sure we need to know all that stuff!?! I got 79% but that's shocking imo because a lot of the stuff I had no clue about. We don't need to know homebox sequences in such detail do we? and nitric acid I had no clue lol.. Can people who did this test please reassure me on this or am i doomed?
    It's only mentioned briefly in my text book, it was just one of the things I struggle with so I make a lot of questions on it, don't panic! Which text book are you using? 79% still good
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    (Original post by titchygirl1701)
    It's only mentioned briefly in my text book, it was just one of the things I struggle with so I make a lot of questions on it, don't panic! Which text book are you using? 79% still good
    OCR Heinemann (sp) one, I didn't think people used other ones lol this is specific to our course. Although it does have some stuff we don't need to know..
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    (Original post by slacker07906)
    Haha is there any similarities? Could it be they both allow the mammal to take action which enable them to survive, theyare both affected by environmen i.e. the alleles in innate behaviour that have been selected for are due to the environment that have resulted them to evolve by natural selection and learned is modified by exerience from surrounding.

    Answer?

    Also, explain the types of innate behaviour and its advantages?
    Tbh, I asked this on purpose coz this type of scenario nearly cost me some marks wen examiners asked the similarities between haemoglobin and collagen (this is from AS unit 2) wen there is none in the book......jus being cautious mi8!
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    (Original post by heartskippedabeat)
    I'm starting to really stress out about this now
    6 days to go!
    I hope mitosis, animal behaviour and ecosystems come up, and not muscles or PCR
    NOT mitosis! :O You mean meiosis right? lo
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    (Original post by sportycricketer)
    NOT mitosis! :O You mean meiosis right? lo
    omg :facepalm2:

    yeah i do haha! see, i've basically failed already
    12 hours straight of revising this module has obviously taken it out of me
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    Explain how genetic markers in plasmids can be used to identify the bacteria that have been taken up by the recombinant plasmid???
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    (Original post by sillysal)
    Explain how genetic markers in plasmids can be used to identify the bacteria that have been taken up by the recombinant plasmid???
    Plasmid used which contains resistance genes for Tetracycline and Ampicillin, restriction enzyme used which has restriction site at the middle of the tetracycline gene so plasmids which take up the required gene are not resistant to tetracycline.

    Bacteria grown on nutrient agar, so colonies grow.
    Colonies placed on Ampicillin agar all bacteria that have taken up a plasmid will grow.
    Colonies placed on Tetracycline agar bacteria that do not take up the required gene grow as they are still resistant.
    Comparing colonies you will find that bacteria that grow on Ampicillin agar, but dont grow on Tetracycline are the ones that took up the required gene.
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    I'm sure they can technically ask about anything on the OCR book so skipping stuff because isn't on the spec could be unwise.
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    (Original post by sillysal)
    Explain how genetic markers in plasmids can be used to identify the bacteria that have been taken up by the recombinant plasmid???
    Well, either you can put a marker in that codes for a protein which glows on exposure to UV light - so you can tell which bacteria have taken up the required plasmid, as the marker gene would be inserted in the plasmid.

    Or, you can grow it on agar - on antibiotics, so the plasmid would have antibiotic resistance genes, an example of this is:

    1) Transfer bacteria onto an antibiotic(e.g ampycillin) but for explanatory purposes, just call it antibiotic A. The plasmid has resistance for antibiotic A, so will grow on the agar to form a colony.

    2) Then, transfer a few of theses bacteria to the agar containing antibiotic B (e.g tetralycin) the plasmid doesn't have resistance for this antibiotic, because the target size for the restriction enzyme was on the resistance gene for antibiotic B.

    So the bacteria you want, are the ones that can grow on antibiotic A, but not on antibiotic B.

    This technique = replica plating.

    Hope that helps
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    (Original post by MoMatrix)
    I'm sure they can technically ask about anything on the OCR book so skipping stuff because isn't on the spec could be unwise.
    To be fair, your not really going to be asked many questions that are simply re-calling information in the book anyway. It's applying your knowledge to new scenarios, so as long as you have the 'know-how' of what actually is going on, you just need to remember to apply it.

    I'm sure this may be useful for anyone, I read the examiners report, and it said that no more then one third of the marks are just for basic facts. 20% is generally synoptic, 10% is 'How Science Works' and from there the rest is testing your knowledge questions.
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    (Original post by Waqar Y)
    To be fair, your not really going to be asked many questions that are simply re-calling information in the book anyway. It's applying your knowledge to new scenarios, so as long as you have the 'know-how' of what actually is going on, you just need to remember to apply it.

    I'm sure this may be useful for anyone, I read the examiners report, and it said that no more then one third of the marks are just for basic facts. 20% is generally synoptic, 10% is 'How Science Works' and from there the rest is testing your knowledge questions.
    Synoptic they can ask knowledge from AS right......? You guys on here gone through the AS stuff
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    Thankyou MoMatrix and Waqar Y for explaining that to me!
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    (Original post by Waqar Y)
    I'm sure this may be useful for anyone, I read the examiners report, and it said that no more then one third of the marks are just for basic facts. 20% is generally synoptic, 10% is 'How Science Works' and from there the rest is testing your knowledge questions.
    That's pretty useful actually. Do you know about the synoptic topics specifically?
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    (Original post by sportycricketer)
    That's pretty useful actually. Do you know about the synoptic topics specifically?
    Nope, but i'd honestly consider going back through some of the phloem transport/enzyme/DNA/biodiversity stuff and F214 - the neurones, action potentials and what not.
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    (Original post by Waqar Y)
    Nope, but i'd honestly consider going back through some of the phloem transport/enzyme/DNA/biodiversity stuff and F214 - the neurones, action potentials and what not.
    Phloem transport?? Isnt that independent to F211??
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    gene mutation definition anyone?
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    (Original post by Waqar Y)
    Nope, but i'd honestly consider going back through some of the phloem transport/enzyme/DNA/biodiversity stuff and F214 - the neurones, action potentials and what not.
    F211 had questions on heart and source sink sucrose...
    F212 had questions on smoking, biodiversity CITES :P DNA sequence, replication etc, Photosynthesis, Starch, Cellulose...near the start those missing words to fill hmmm there was stuff about Enzymes indeed.. Coenzymes etc
    F214 January had a 3 mark question on labelling parts of the brain...so anything is possible from F214 especially so...as there's only 1 hour to assess the topics...there's likely to be a few F214 questions in F215....
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    can anybody explain to the difference between gross primary productivity and net primary productivity....

    Can some Biology genius sort out the confusion ...

    from what I've learned

    Gross Primary productivity- the rate at which plants convert light energy into chemical energy

    Net Primary productivity- the remaining energy, after plants loose some energy through respiration...

    PS is net primary productivity the energy available to primary consumers after plants loose some energy through respiration..
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    (Original post by Viva009)
    gene mutation definition anyone?
    A change in the DNA nucleotide sequence
 
 
 
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