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    Well there's quite a few people doing the revision session now
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    (Original post by slacker07906)
    Well there's quite a few people doing the revision session now
    If you want PM your addie and we'll invite people from either sides I have about 4/5 people including myself
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    Talking to my teacher today and he gave us a list of stuff which is most likely to come up after januarys paper,

    Genetic crosses
    Plant hormones
    Meiosis
    Genome sequencing
    PCR
    Nerves
    Brain

    anyone else know what else to add to the list. Hope revision goes well for u all
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    this was all stuff that was left out/barely mentioned in january
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    (Original post by Soloman)
    Talking to my teacher today and he gave us a list of stuff which is most likely to come up after januarys paper,

    Genetic crosses
    Plant hormones
    Meiosis
    Genome sequencing
    PCR
    Nerves
    Brain

    anyone else know what else to add to the list. Hope revision goes well for u all

    How reliable is your teacher? lol
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    (Original post by DontPropositionMe)
    How reliable is your teacher? lol
    usually hes really good
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    can stuff on photosynthesis and respiration come up? or is that more likely for unit 4, if it does will it just be something basic about them, and only few marks?
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    Yeh I don't think they would ever ask a long answer question that's based on synoptic knowledge.
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    Every time I think I've aced one concept, I realise there's twenty others I haven't LOL!

    Any clever clogs...
    1. Do we need to know the basic structure of a fermenter? I had a question asking me to label one, I was like WHOAH haha "sample inlet" I can't find this in the spec.

    2. When we cut a plasmid with a restriction endonuclease, and form stick ends complementary to the desired gene, what SEALS the plasmid? Ligase or polymerase?? Am I right in thinking polymerase adds free nucleotides and ligase seals the phospho-sug backbones? Why isn't ligase used in PCR then, what's holding the added nucleotides together covalently? (This question may not make sense but hey ho)

    3. Chi-sqaured test. I get confused with Psychology.. Are we looking for the value to be BELOW critical value to say there's no significant difference?
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    (Original post by Ro27)
    Every time I think I've aced one concept, I realise there's twenty others I haven't LOL!

    Any clever clogs...
    1. Do we need to know the basic structure of a fermenter? I had a question asking me to label one, I was like WHOAH haha "sample inlet" I can't find this in the spec.

    2. When we cut a plasmid with a restriction endonuclease, and form stick ends complementary to the desired gene, what SEALS the plasmid? Ligase or polymerase?? Am I right in thinking polymerase adds free nucleotides and ligase seals the phospho-sug backbones? Why isn't ligase used in PCR then, what's holding the added nucleotides together covalently? (This question may not make sense but hey ho)

    3. Chi-sqaured test. I get confused with Psychology.. Are we looking for the value to be BELOW critical value to say there's no significant difference?

    Its Dna ligase thats used to join them . In pcr Polymerase is used because its heat stable so it can stand the 72 degrees and can still work.
    If its below that means we accept and its due to chance so not significant . Thats the one we are looking for .

    I think not 100 percent sure on the answers can someone tell me if im right ... I am dreding this exam so much to learn and they can ask you anything.
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    Oh and its prob best to use the word ''Anneal'' then join . My bad.
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    Hey guys just wanted to check that i got genome sequencing sorted. The chromosome is sheared into sections of DNA that are all 100 000 base pairs. Now if we focus on one of those sections, they get inserted into a BAC and then inserted into E coli. The E coli is cultured and left to reproduce so that there are many copies of the BAC and the DNA section in it. The BAC's are extracted from the cells and the DNA sections are extracted from the DNA. Now there are many copies of that 100 000 base pair section and this is then mixed with a range of different restriction enzymes to create fragments of DNA of differing lengths. These are then sepearted by the process of electropheresis in orded of size and then each of these fragments are taken one by one and undergo automated sequecing so that we know the base sequence of each of the fragments. A computer than detects overlapping regions from the cuts made by the restriction enzymes in these fragments and arranages the whole 100 000 base pair sequence in the right order. CORR BLIMEY thats a typful.
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    (Original post by mazam)
    Its Dna ligase thats used to join them . In pcr Polymerase is used because its heat stable so it can stand the 72 degrees and can still work.
    If its below that means we accept and its due to chance so not significant . Thats the one we are looking for .

    I think not 100 percent sure on the answers can someone tell me if im right ... I am dreding this exam so much to learn and they can ask you anything.
    Thaanks!
    I get the polymerase thing, the enzyme is Taq polymerase (from thermophilic bacteria) or something like that right? So it's heat stable.
    What I'm still hazy on is,
    Polymerase adds these nucleotides,
    They form hydrogen bonds,
    But what catalyses the adjacent nucleotides to form the backbones so the strand is stabilised to undergo another cycle (which would just break these H-bonds again)?

    Maybe I'm just reading too much into it,
    It is after all called the POLYMERASE chain reaction, so I'll just roll with that!
    Thanks again!
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    (Original post by Ro27)
    Thaanks!
    I get the polymerase thing, the enzyme is Taq polymerase (from thermophilic bacteria) or something like that right? So it's heat stable.
    What I'm still hazy on is,
    Polymerase adds these nucleotides,
    They form hydrogen bonds,
    But what catalyses the adjacent nucleotides to form the backbones so the strand is stabilised to undergo another cycle (which would just break these H-bonds again)?

    Maybe I'm just reading too much into it,
    It is after all called the POLYMERASE chain reaction, so I'll just roll with that!
    Thanks again!
    H bonds wouldnt break again because the temperature is at 72 not 95 degrees. thats what i was told , but yeah i think your readings into a bit too much ... If you go into the purple Ocr book it explains it really well.
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    Right. So let me get this straight.

    Innate behaviour is genetically determined and present from hatching/birth.

    Learned behaviour is modified by experience.

    The differences: innate behaviour is genetically determined, not changed by experience and passed onto offspring. Whereas, in learned behaviour, it is modified by experience, not passed onto offspring but can be taught to offspring. In innate behaviour patterns of behaviour are fixed I.e. The animals always responds in the same way to the same stimulus. Whereas in learned, it can be changed over time by experience. Furthermore, innate behaviour is fixed (stereotypical) in all members of the species. Whereas in learned, there is variety shown across members of the species. Finally, innate behaviour is unintelligent behaviour in that the animal does not understand the purpose of behaviour yet learned behaviour is intelligent and deliberate behaviour.

    Advantages of innate behaviour.

    Innate behaviour is advantageous because it doesn't need time to be learned. Young inexperienced animals are able to take action which enable them to survive. In invertebrates with short lifespans there isn't time to learn the behaviour. Also, many animals don't care for their young and therefore there are no opportunities for newly hatched animals to learn; they have to be already programmed with patterns of behaviour that allow them to survive. Finally, innate behaviour is adapted for a particular environment because the alleles which determine them have been selected by natural selection.

    Disadvantage is that innate behaviour cannot be changed when it is no longer appropriate or if the environment changes.

    Eeeek I hope this don't come up!!! Anyone got any additional disadvantages?
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    (Original post by mazam)
    Oh and its prob best to use the word ''Anneal'' then join . My bad.
    I wouldn't use the term 'anneal' unless I was referring to Genetic Probes. Annealing is a specific term used for Genetic probes. You still get the mark for saying 'join' and it shows you actually understand what your writing about as opposed to saying big words just because you read it on a page about a different and completely specific concept.
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    someone care to explain the graduation of response concept?
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    Someone explain dominant and recessive epistasis please! Just dont understand it

    With examples please!!
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    (Original post by sillysal)
    someone care to explain the graduation of response concept?
    wtf is that lol
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    anyone ? and i'll positive rep anyone who can help me with that and also ermm what is up with the concept of linked genes (not sex linked). Why are they written like PlPl rather than PPll ?????? SSSSSSSSSS
 
 
 
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