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    could anyone answer q 2b on the spec paper? seriously wth?!
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    (Original post by 786girl)
    could anyone answer q 2b on the spec paper? seriously wth?!
    What's the question?
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    (Original post by 786girl)
    WHAT IS A GANGLION?
    and whats it on about when it says that the parasympathetic: the neurones of a pathway are linked at a ganglion within target tissues so pre ganglionic neurones vary in length

    and

    post ganglionic (omg what is this word lol) neurones secret acetylcholine as neurotransmitter at synapse between neurone and effector

    could someone just outline differences between sympathetic and para in a way that i can understanf the whole ganglion business
    a ganglion is where a group of neurones meet. so this could be a neuromuscular junction and the pre ganglionic neurones are those before the ganglion, and the post ganglionic neurones are those neurones after the ganglion. as for the rest its probably easier to just memorise it rather than understand it all fully. someone mentioned the 4s's which helped me learn it....

    Sympathetic, Short preganglionic neurones,Spinal cord is where theyre situated outside of, Secrete noradrenaline.

    I know its quite mean but i remembered the parasympathetic by relating the word para to the paraolympics where people aren't as fast as in the olympics...so everything is slowed down e.g decreased heart rate, ventilation rate...
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    (Original post by -Jaz-)
    Ah well that sucks! I quite like that one :P Oh God, if they hit us with ecology I will scream and run out of the exam hall!
    haha, I don't mind ecology that much as I'm really good at bull****ting, and thats all you need to do for it

    my perfect exam would have lots of module 1 and then a mixture of 3+4

    no biotechnology for me
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    (Original post by rebeccalouise_92)
    I know its quite mean but i remembered the parasympathetic by relating the word para to the paraolympics where people aren't as fast as in the olympics...so everything is slowed down e.g decreased heart rate, ventilation rate...
    Quality!
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    Ok, quick question:

    In the OCR revision guide (page 66) for gene sequencing, it talks about the use of NTP's and then ddNTP's to halt the growing complementary primer at a specific base (depending on the ddNTP) and that basically if you compiled all these overlapping fragments you got "nested fragments" which you can then sort by gel electrophoresis.

    However in the large book (p 167) it talks about mapping and then shearing and using BAC's. Are these completely different processes?
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    (Original post by infernalcradle)
    haha, I don't mind ecology that much as I'm really good at bull****ting, and thats all you need to do for it

    my perfect exam would have lots of module 1 and then a mixture of 3+4

    no biotechnology for me
    My bull****ting usually ends up in me writing about 6 lines for a 2 mark question, then not even getting the 2 marks! :/

    My perfect exam will be fill in the gaps and tick-boxes, like back in GCSE?
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    (Original post by DrDr)
    Ok, quick question:

    In the OCR revision guide (page 66) for gene sequencing, it talks about the use of NTP's and then ddNTP's to halt the growing complementary primer at a specific base (depending on the ddNTP) and that basically if you compiled all these overlapping fragments you got "nested fragments" which you can then sort by gel electrophoresis.

    However in the large book (p 167) it talks about mapping and then shearing and using BAC's. Are these completely different processes?

    I've never ever seen this ddNTP business? :/ And all mark schemes seem to talk about mapping, then shearing and using BACs so maybe stick to that? Better to learn both though, although I have no idea what the NTP thing is! But at least if they ask you something specific about that, you could answer it
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    (Original post by -Jaz-)
    I've never ever seen this ddNTP business? :/ And all mark schemes seem to talk about mapping, then shearing and using BACs so maybe stick to that? Better to learn both though, although I have no idea what the NTP thing is! But at least if they ask you something specific about that, you could answer it
    ddNTPs lack a 3OH group, so terminate the sugar-phosphate backbone. They can be radioactively or fluorescently labelled so you can see the termination
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    (Original post by thecookiem0nster)
    ddNTPs lack a 3OH group, so terminate the sugar-phosphate backbone. They can be radioactively or fluorescently labelled so you can see the termination
    Oh THOSE!!!! Arent they just called modified nucleotides?

    Just realised it was you! Thanks Ace xx
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    (Original post by DrDr)
    Ok, quick question:

    In the OCR revision guide (page 66) for gene sequencing, it talks about the use of NTP's and then ddNTP's to halt the growing complementary primer at a specific base (depending on the ddNTP) and that basically if you compiled all these overlapping fragments you got "nested fragments" which you can then sort by gel electrophoresis.

    However in the large book (p 167) it talks about mapping and then shearing and using BAC's. Are these completely different processes?
    Yes they are. You do the shearing, mapping and BAC stuff first. Then you use the DNA primers, DNA polymerase, normal nucleotides and ddNTPs with 4 different lanes and electrophoresis
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    (Original post by -Jaz-)
    Oh THOSE!!!! Arent they just called modified nucleotides?

    Just realised it was you! Thanks Ace xx
    Lool yeah they are... no probs xx
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    (Original post by DrDr)
    Ok, quick question:

    In the OCR revision guide (page 66) for gene sequencing, it talks about the use of NTP's and then ddNTP's to halt the growing complementary primer at a specific base (depending on the ddNTP) and that basically if you compiled all these overlapping fragments you got "nested fragments" which you can then sort by gel electrophoresis.

    However in the large book (p 167) it talks about mapping and then shearing and using BAC's. Are these completely different processes?
    Following cookiemonster's reply - ddNTPs are just the modified nucleotides used in mapping - the ones used to halt the replication because they don't have a 3'OH group - so no, they're not 2 completely different techniques - they're just a continuation of the same technique
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    im screwed for this exam. toooooooooo much to learn! Everyone ready?
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    Just did Jan '11...What the hell was with that comparing PCR to in vivo or whatever one. Got 0/8 for that



    Thankfully grade boundaries were super low
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    (Original post by -Jaz-)
    Following cookiemonster's reply - ddNTPs are just the modified nucleotides used in mapping - the ones used to halt the replication because they don't have a 3'OH group - so no, they're not 2 completely different techniques - they're just a continuation of the same technique
    Ugh, yeah but it isn't the whole process :s Thanks, revision guide :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by englishman129)
    im screwed for this exam. toooooooooo much to learn! Everyone ready?
    Noooo
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    (Original post by DrDr)
    Ugh, yeah but it isn't the whole process :s Thanks, revision guide :rolleyes:
    Lol I wouldnt rely on that too much if I were you :/ screwed me up for the past exams... :/
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    (Original post by heartskippedabeat)
    Noooo
    lol anyone reading the AS book for synoptic knowledge?
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    i've forgotten practically everything in AS! any tips on what i should really go over....
 
 
 
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