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    Hey guys,

    I applied to Cardiff University for a course that normally requires a GSCE grade B in english; I only have a C and a D (Eng / Eng Lit) but received an offer regardless. The offer itself does not mention anything about GSCEs - just the A-Level requirements for the course.

    This might sound stupid, but just before I firm my offer, should I call them up and make sure that they haven't made a mistake? Can they take an offer back if that's the case? I don't want to get there and for them to go 'oh, god' or for it to cause trouble later.

    And no, I did not lie on my personal statement - everything's there, clear as day.

    Thanks!
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    Sounds like you're a badass and have undercut the competition.
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    They probably chose to overlook that grade cos the rest of your application was very strong. Take it as a compliment.
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    So they can't rescind it when I get there or anything, or spring extra conditions on me post-offer? I'm still in shock, I found out after I applied that I didn't have the required GSCE so the offer came as quite a surprise (especially as Cardiff was my first choice), so excuse me if I'm a gibbering moron.
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    No, I'm sure that as long as you've included it on your UCAS they can't take the offer back. Its not like you were lying to them
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    (Original post by mikeocd)
    So they can't rescind it when I get there or anything
    They can remove it any time between now and when you sign on, but they're unlikely to. If it would ease your mind, phone them now - if they're going to remove it, makes no difference whether it's now or later.
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    (Original post by TheSownRose)
    They can remove it any time between now and when you sign on, but they're unlikely to. If it would ease your mind, phone them now - if they're going to remove it, makes no difference whether it's now or later.
    Even if I accept it as firm (thereby losing my other offers)? If so, I'll definitely give them a ring just to make sure
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    (Original post by mikeocd)
    Even if I accept it as firm (thereby losing my other offers)? If so, I'll definitely give them a ring just to make sure
    Theoretically, yes. In practice, I suspect it becomes harder to remove it the further you go along - the onus isn't really on you to realise they've made a mistake (unless it's blindingly obvious, and this isn't) and it would look pretty bad.
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    (Original post by TheSownRose)
    Theoretically, yes. In practice, I suspect it becomes harder to remove it the further you go along - the onus isn't really on you to realise they've made a mistake (unless it's blindingly obvious, and this isn't) and it would look pretty bad.
    They can't take it away once you've firmed it, as the firming is a contract between you and the university. The main reason for this is, once you've firmed the choice you can't get offers back from the universities you rejected so it would be very unfair if the university was allowed to do this!
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    (Original post by chriscpritchard)
    They can't take it away once you've firmed it, as the firming is a contract between you and the university. The main reason for this is, once you've firmed the choice you can't get offers back from the universities you rejected so it would be very unfair if the university was allowed to do this!
    There will be a sentence on the offer letter saying you also need to meet minimum general requirements for the course unless otherwise stated. Often this isn't a problem but these do generally include things such as Cs in maths and english GCSE etc. A uni may be willing to waive the requirements for someone they like but it is best to check as they can withdraw an offer on these grounds if they wish.
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    (Original post by chriscpritchard)
    They can't take it away once you've firmed it, as the firming is a contract between you and the university. The main reason for this is, once you've firmed the choice you can't get offers back from the universities you rejected so it would be very unfair if the university was allowed to do this!
    That's a myth - they can take it away, because there is no contract until you have got to the uni and signed on. You can choose not to go there and they can choose not to have you. However, they need applicants to trust them so it's so far from routine procedure that it's become known as something that just ... doesn't happen.
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    (Original post by chriscpritchard)
    They can't take it away once you've firmed it, as the firming is a contract between you and the university. The main reason for this is, once you've firmed the choice you can't get offers back from the universities you rejected so it would be very unfair if the university was allowed to do this!
    I wish I had a pound for every time I've seen someone post this nonsense. It is untrue in every detail. Firmly accepted offers can be rescinded or changed (though it wouldn't necessarily be easy and a good reason would be required at that stage) and there is no contract between the candidate and the university at this stage of the process - that comes later, when the candidate actually registers.

    In this case the OP would be wise, in my view, to check with the university before accepting the offer.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    I wish I had a pound for every time I've seen someone post this nonsense. It is untrue in every detail. Firmly accepted offers can be rescinded or changed (though it wouldn't necessarily be easy and a good reason would be required at that stage) and there is no contract between the candidate and the university at this stage of the process - that comes later, when the candidate actually registers.

    In this case the OP would be wise, in my view, to check with the university before accepting the offer.
    UCLAN, Worcester and Cambridge say that it is a contract (Cambridge, UCLAN, Worcester)

    Worcester says it best.
    (Original post by Worcester)
    The admissions process falls under legislation that regulates ‘contracts formed at a distance’. The contract that is created when you accept an offer either through UCAS or directly to the University of Worcester is binding on the University (i.e. the University of Worcester must admit you if you satisfy all of the conditions specified in the offer)
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    (Original post by chriscpritchard)
    UCLAN, Worcester and Cambridge say that it is a contract (Cambridge, UCLAN, Worcester)

    Worcester says it best.
    Just because these insititutions state that it is a contract doesn't make it so. A fundamental requirement to form a legally-binding contract is consideration, which means that the contracting parties must each provide something of value. At this stage the student is certainly not doing so and there can, therefore, be no contract. If the universities choose to consider themselves bound as if in a contract that is a matter for them but it has no legal standing.

    I'd be very surprised if the distance selling regulations applied to this process, given that the actual contract is formed in person when you register, but I can't be bothered to investigate further.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    Just because these insititutions state that it is a contract doesn't make it so. A fundamental requirement to form a legally-binding contract is consideration, which means that the contracting parties must each provide something of value. At this stage the student is certainly not doing so and there can, therefore, be no contract. If the universities choose to consider themselves bound as if in a contract that is a matter for them but it has no legal standing.

    I'd be very surprised if the distance selling regulations applied to this process, given that the actual contract is formed in person when you register, but I can't be bothered to investigate further.
    UCAS says that they are binding too... http://www.ucas.ac.uk/he_staff/admis.../make_decision (IE, can only be changed if there is a material change to the applicants application

    Bear in mind, the student is providing something of value - their agreement that they will not be going to another university this year, and that the university will gain the student's tuition fees.
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    (Original post by chriscpritchard)
    UCAS says that they are binding too... http://www.ucas.ac.uk/he_staff/admis.../make_decision (IE, can only be changed if there is a material change to the applicants application
    Binding within the rules of the UCAS process, which (a) crucially, are not published and (b) give universities the right to withdraw or change decisions dependent upon various factors, which include the candidate not telling the truth or not providing information when asked. This is not a contract.

    Bear in mind, the student is providing something of value - their agreement that they will not be going to another university this year, and that the university will gain the student's tuition fees.
    More nonsense. :facepalm:
    The candidate is not bound in any way and provides nothing of value whatever. Candidates can withdraw at any time up to the point of registration at the university, with no penalty, and candidates do go to other universities after accepting offers, so you are on the wrong track there. In fact, UCAS has provided an extra easy path to do so - UCAS Adjustment. An agreement to pay tuition fees isn't made until much later.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    Binding within the rules of the UCAS process, which (a) crucially, are not published and (b) give universities the right to withdraw or change decisions dependent upon various factors, which include the candidate not telling the truth or not providing information when asked. This is not a contract.
    How is that not a contract, the universities agree not to accept (undergraduate, pre registration) applicants through any system other than UCAS via a contract with UCAS. Within this, they agree to follow the rules UCAS provides (again, via the contract). The student agrees to provide truthful information (UCAS's terms and conditions... a contract), and UCAS states that should a student not fulfill their contractual obligations then a university can rescind the offer.


    (Original post by Good bloke)
    More nonsense. :facepalm:
    The candidate is not bound in any way and provides nothing of value whatever. Candidates can withdraw at any time up to the point of registration at the university, with no penalty, and candidates do go to other universities after accepting offers, so you are on the wrong track there. In fact, UCAS has provided an extra easy path to do so - UCAS Adjustment. An agreement to pay tuition fees isn't made until much later.
    Once a student withdraws from UCAS they cannot apply to any universities (even through clearing), except via adjustment, UNLESS they get the univiersity's permission to be released from this choice, which shows that the student is bound to either go to that university, be released WITH PERMISSION FROM THE UNIVERSITY, or not go to university entirely (unless they partake in adjustement, which can be (and probably is) written in the university agreement.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    Binding within the rules of the UCAS process, which (a) crucially, are not published and (b) give universities the right to withdraw or change decisions dependent upon various factors, which include the candidate not telling the truth or not providing information when asked. This is not a contract.



    More nonsense. :facepalm:
    The candidate is not bound in any way and provides nothing of value whatever. Candidates can withdraw at any time up to the point of registration at the university, with no penalty, and candidates do go to other universities after accepting offers, so you are on the wrong track there. In fact, UCAS has provided an extra easy path to do so - UCAS Adjustment. An agreement to pay tuition fees isn't made until much later.
    I don't want 2 be rude but i m bit confused, from what your saying
    no matter what offer a uni gives you, they still don't have to take you even if the offer is uncondiational and if you accept it

    So basically your saying that no one is guarantee a place until they register at the uni?
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    (Original post by chriscpritchard)
    the student is bound to either go to that university, be released WITH PERMISSION FROM THE UNIVERSITY, or not go to university entirely (unless they partake in adjustement
    That leaves the student with a lot of options that are not go to university I am bound to go to, doesn't it? It doesn't sound much like consideration for a contract.
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    (Original post by FinalMH)
    I don't want 2 be rude but i m bit confused, from what your saying
    no matter what offer a uni gives you, they still don't have to take you even if the offer is uncondiational and if you accept it

    So basically your saying that no one is guarantee a place?
    No, I'm not saying that. There are reasons why candidates can lose offers - mainly to do with dishonesty in the application or changing the content of the application - but they are generally safe after accepting an offer. The UCAS rules protect them. However, the university may not, in the end, run the course at all, which would also leave the student high and dry - though this happens extremely rarely. The argument was about the myth that the university is bound under a contract to take the student, which it isn't.
 
 
 

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