Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
Turn on thread page Beta
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    Depression.
    What are some common misconceptions about this illness?
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    That if you just "man up" everything will suddenly get better. :nothing:
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    That you're just trying to seek attention
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    they're only upset about something silly and small like a fly dying. Being a drama queen and everyone in depression is suicidal
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ape Gone Insane)
    Misconception: Medical drugs like anti-depressants make everything better

    Firstly, any good doctor should not start you off with drugs. Secondly, different anti-depressants work with different people. And lastly, they can make your life worse. You can essentially become a zombie, no depressive emotion - yes but not capable of any emotion. However, you can still get a good combination of drugs that work.
    Good work, but I think with this first one there can often be the opposite misconception too. For instance, that if you take antidepressants it means that you're crazy, or that it's weak to turn to medications, or that all antidepressants will turn you into a zombie, affect your personality, etc. There seems to be a lot of stigma out there around medical drugs for depression. But clinical depression is an illness, and like many other illnesses, drugs can assist. They certainly won't 'make it all better' but they can help to 'take the edge off' to allow the individual to do the other hard work involved in turning thought patterns around.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    That it is entirely a biomedical problem.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by goewyn)
    Good work, but I think with this first one there can often be the opposite misconception too. For instance, that if you take antidepressants it means that you're crazy, or that it's weak to turn to medications, or that all antidepressants will turn you into a zombie, affect your personality, etc. There seems to be a lot of stigma out there around medical drugs for depression. But clinical depression is an illness, and like many other illnesses, drugs can assist. They certainly won't 'make it all better' but they can help to 'take the edge off' to allow the individual to do the other hard work involved in turning thought patterns around.
    Actually, it is possible for antidepressants to 'make it all better' sometimes. I had major depression, and never had any talking therapy (looong waiting list), but when I started the right antidepressant all my problems went away. Obviously that's not the case for everyone, but it's certainly true for me.


    Another misconception: that telling your doctor you're depressed/having suicidal thoughts will get you sectioned. Things have to be very serious before you get sectioned, i.e. you're a danger to yourself or others.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    I thought you meant ******** not depression
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ape Gone Insane)
    Misconception: People who say you're just thinking negative.

    It's not as simple as that. There are actual chemical imbalances (don't know much) within your brain. You should never disregard someone's depressive problem as thinking negative, instead you should help them focus on the core of their problem - or just listen. Listening can make all the difference. Many depressed people just don't have anyone to talk to so they build up the emotion and their problems. What seems hopeless becomes more hopeless, and you're stuck in a vicious circle.

    The chemical imbalance theory (that depression is due to a lack of serotonin/5-HTT in the brain) is ultimately unproven and improvable, due to the fact we cannot look into a living human brain. It is my opinion that depression has been medicalised so that pharamaceutical companies can make billions of profit. What depressed people need is counselling/CBT- not medication. See about publication bias within the antidepression literature (e.g. Turner et al. (2008) who found that 31% of 74 studies on ADs were not published due to finding non-significant results, and a proportion of those that were published were published to convey a positive result when this wasn't the case).

    Learnt a lot about it on my course, and done lots of reading around the topic. It gets me so wound up when depression is conveyed as a mental illness and anti-depressants are the first thing people think of to cure it. The vast majority of depressed people can identify what is making them depressed- why a biological cure for a non-biological cause? Alternatively, when people experience depression for no apparent reason, psychoanalysis has been shown to uncover the source of depression (see Breggin, 1992 if interested).
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Beckym14)
    The chemical imbalance theory (that depression is due to a lack of serotonin/5-HTT in the brain) is ultimately unproven and improvable, due to the fact we cannot look into a living human brain. It is my opinion that depression has been medicalised so that pharamaceutical companies can make billions of profit. What depressed people need is counselling/CBT- not medication. See about publication bias within the antidepression literature (e.g. Turner et al. (2008) who found that 31% of 74 studies on ADs were not published due to finding non-significant results, and a proportion of those that were published were published to convey a positive result when this wasn't the case).

    Learnt a lot about it on my course, and done lots of reading around the topic. It gets me so wound up when depression is conveyed as a mental illness and anti-depressants are the first thing people think of to cure it. The vast majority of depressed people can identify what is making them depressed- why a biological cure for a non-biological cause? Alternatively, when people experience depression for no apparent reason, psychoanalysis has been shown to uncover the source of depression (see Breggin, 1992 if interested).
    A point you seem to have missed is that, although we might not know how antidepressants work, we still know that they do work. In a lot of cases they don't of course, I was on six or seven different ones over the course of two years before I found one that worked, but once I started that one I went almost instantly from being severely depressed to feeling absolutely fine.

    I do agree that doctors are overwilling to prescribe drugs, when talking treatment might be a better option, but the fact is the NHS can't cope with the demand for psychologists/counsellors, and they probably feel that giving someone antidepressants is better than sending them away with nothing. Also, in more severely depressed people they can be so depressed that they find it almost impossible to talk or engage with people, so antidepressants are necessary to bring them up to a level that allows them to participate in talking treatment.

    If I had my way, those with only mild depression would automatically receive talking treatment, which would hopefully prevent them from becoming more depressed. I'd reserve drugs for those who were more severely depressed, alongside some form of counselling. But this is unlikely to happen any time soon, so until then we'll just have to put up with the overprescribing of antidepressants, for want of anything better.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Depression.
    What are some common misconceptions about this illness?
    I've often found that one of the most common misconceptions about depression is that it's actually depressing.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ape Gone Insane)
    Misconception: It's there for life
    No, treatment of it can eradicate it completely
    This gave me hope. Thankyou.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    This vid says it all!:

    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ape Gone Insane)
    Oh hey. :console:

    Yeah, don't ever think it's never going to go away. It may die with time, or it may take a great deal of personal willpower or just small efforts day by day. I know plenty of people who had severe, clinical depression - they spent years thinking it would consume them for the rest of their lives. But some of them are better now, much better.
    I'd never generalise about anyone else's depression, but I like to think that mine is caused primarily by the situation I'm in and the things that have happened in my life, and that this should pick up once I leave home and talk to a decent counsellor I am in the process of trying to procure antidepressants to tide me over, but my GP seems to think that because I'm biologically female it's obviously my period :rolleyes: But for someone depressed, I am curiously optimistic - I refuse to give in to it, I refuse to treat it like a death sentence, and I've convinced myself that there is a chance of it getting better eventually. So when people say stuff like that, it adds weight to my opinion.

    I know that some people don't get better, as well. But I'm really hoping that I'm one of the lucky ones.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    That it's just a mood and if you "man up" it will go away -.-
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    Weed and alcohol make it worse. Promise.

    White doctors tend to be nicer than asian doctors (just a generalisation from personal experience).

    Most people brought up in countries out of the EU will think its "made up" and its all in your head and you dont need drugs for it. (personal experience)

    Citalopram does give you suicidal tendencies.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TomInce6666)
    Weed and alcohol make it worse. Promise.

    White doctors tend to be nicer than asian doctors (just a generalisation from personal experience).

    Most people brought up in countries out of the EU will think its "made up" and its all in your head and you dont need drugs for it. (personal experience)

    Citalopram does give you suicidal tendencies.
    Weed might be bad for some people, but it was basically the only thing that got me through my second year of uni. But then it stopped working, so I stopped smoking it. You just need to know your own body, and work out what's good/bad for it.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I thought the D word would be something else... my bad
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by superwolf)
    A point you seem to have missed is that, although we might not know how antidepressants work, we still know that they do work. In a lot of cases they don't of course, I was on six or seven different ones over the course of two years before I found one that worked, but once I started that one I went almost instantly from being severely depressed to feeling absolutely fine.
    What I was trying to get across was that antidepressants are being hailed as the answer to depression when in reality there is not a wide body of scientific evidence to show that they are much better than placebo, and this is obviously not well known to the public. The fact you tried 6/7 before finding one that works would support this.. There's also this thing called the enhanced placebo effect, where more side effects are associated with a better outcome.

    (Original post by superwolf)
    If I had my way, those with only mild depression would automatically receive talking treatment, which would hopefully prevent them from becoming more depressed. I'd reserve drugs for those who were more severely depressed, alongside some form of counselling. But this is unlikely to happen any time soon, so until then we'll just have to put up with the overprescribing of antidepressants, for want of anything better.
    I agree this would be good. Although I wish people knew the facts about the pharamaceutical industry and depression before they decided to start medication. I also think that although I don't have experience of depression, if I'd experienced a particularly traumatic event or had extremely low self-esteem I'd benefit from interacting with inspirational people who have been through similar things to give me hope, and there should be a lot more organisations like this.

    At the end of the day things are not going to change because of the great power the pharmaceutical industry now has- more and more drugs will be released before more effective psychological treatments become available, which is really sad.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Beckym14)
    What I was trying to get across was that antidepressants are being hailed as the answer to depression when in reality there is not a wide body of scientific evidence to show that they are much better than placebo, and this is obviously not well known to the public. The fact you tried 6/7 before finding one that works would support this.. There's also this thing called the enhanced placebo effect, where more side effects are associated with a better outcome.

    I agree this would be good. Although I wish people knew the facts about the pharamaceutical industry and depression before they decided to start medication. I also think that although I don't have experience of depression, if I'd experienced a particularly traumatic event or had extremely low self-esteem I'd benefit from interacting with inspirational people who have been through similar things to give me hope, and there should be a lot more organisations like this.

    At the end of the day things are not going to change because of the great power the pharmaceutical industry now has- more and more drugs will be released before more effective psychological treatments become available, which is really sad.
    My understanding was that while antidepressants are largely ineffective in the cases of mildly to moderately depressed people, they worked a lot better in severely depressed people. I've not actually read any studies of this though, just stuff I've read on the internet. And I think I was just unlucky with antidepressants, some people just seem to be more resistant to them than others. I don't really get your point about the enhanced placebo effect, I don't see what that's got to do with anything.

    For me and, I suspect, a lot of people going on antidepressants is actually a last resort. I researched depression and tried to get better on my own, but when that didn't work and there was no prospect of me getting therapy any time soon I decided to give the drugs a go. So while some people might just take antidepressants because their doctor's given them them, others do research them before deciding to take them. You can tell that just by the fact that not a week goes by on tsr without someone posting a thread about antidepressants, asking for advice and experiences.

    Personally, I don't think inspirational people would have done much for me, when you're depressed it's very easy to get into a mindset of thinking that while other people get better from depression, there's something inherently wrong with you that means that you'll stay depressed forever. It might be hard for someone who's never been depressed to understand it, but a lot of the time I didn't even want to get better - I just assumed that I never would and that the only way out was death. And people who told me things would get better just annoyed me, because it felt like they were lying. However, I can't speak for other people, for them hearing inspirational stories might be really helpful.

    There already are effective psychological treatments, but the NHS isn't willing/able to fund them. Hence why I was depressed for over two years and still never reached the top of a single therapy waiting list.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: March 24, 2011
Poll
“Yanny” or “Laurel”

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.