Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hey everyone!
    I'm currently doing my GCSEs and I will probably be doing Physics next year... however, my Physics teacher (very kindly) said today that if I 'don't understand this, then you won't have a chance next year' when he'd only just introduced us to Fleming's right hand/left hand rule. :rolleyes: Anyway, this has made me think, and i really cut out for it? What kind of person does well at A level? I mean, do you have to be mathematically minded, etc...
    I've always struggled, but managed to work through any difficulties in the end.
    Any other thoughts, tips or opinions of A level Physics are welcome
    Thanks.
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    he's right GCSE physics is a piece of piss
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Long, Hard and Prone to sodomising you when it has the chance....
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    GCSE to AS is a considerable difficulty jump.

    AS to A2 is far worse. Basically, unless you're comfortable with GCSE Phys, you're not doing yourself any favours by taking it at AS, let alone A2.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Tehres a fiar amount of Mathematical content, and a lot of new equations and manipulating. However its all really interesting and epic so take it
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hard, very hard.

    I didnt really revise much at GCSE, you need to put loads of effort in to understanding let alone do well.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I got asked if I would 'pump your dad to save your mum'

    and the thinking behind the decision making has sent me mad!

    I don't see how hypothetically performing a sexual act on my father, whilst my mother was hypothetically having things done to her by a gorilla, would save her life.

    you don't understand, they said that she'd get pumped by gorrilas then thrown into a volcano as we watched on. I DON'T KNOW WHAT TO DO,. I AM GOING MAD. HELP ME
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    I got an A at AS. It wasn't too bad.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    If you like the SI units system and have a passion for exponentials, then go for it
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    I love it, but those that are not mathematically minded tend to struggle quite considerably.
    But if you enjoy it why not!
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    Work hard, enjoy the subject, do well. You don't need to be a genius. I have the natural mental capacity of a retarded stable boy (take my word for it) and seem to be doing good.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I think one of the most important attributes when it comes to physics is just to be able visualise abstract phenomenons like particles and waves.

    Do not be too concerned with the maths, if you're doing AS maths it will be a doddle, and GCSE maths is more than enough to get by. They specifically removed calculus methods from the syllabus to make it more doable for those not doing AS/A2 Maths.
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    its hilarious you'll love it.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Can be quite tricky at first but if you revise and practice, practice and practice you can do well.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sbarron)
    Any physics, even degree level, is all about having a good memory. It's based on 'facts' not opinions so you just need to be able to remember these facts.
    Disagree. Although there is an element of being able to remember equations and facts, a lot of physics is being able to think logically and apply these rules to situations.

    You can have a memory like wikipedia, but if you don't have the ability to apply the knowledge, it won't do a lot of good.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    Like people have said, with a fair grasp on maths (AS maths does help, just gets you happier with number and rearranging equations, is handy but it's not essential).. but in our year, half my physics class gave up after six months and failed the exams, the other half really liked it and did fine. Maybe it's partly our teachers who seem to think physics is the hardest subject, therefore we need to teach ourselves and they sat around mocking us for being rubbish...

    It took til easter for things to click, get my head round it all, and then it was fine. Just make sure you'd be okay dropping it (ie, take four subjects so you can drop physics and still have three left) so if you do try it and find out you're not a fan, and no big loss. If you do like it though (and liking it makes it so much easier/worth the effort) then brilliant, you've gained a fantastic A level! I may be a teeny bit biased, but.. good luck, whatever you do
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    It takes practice, especially at first. But I love it. The amount of theory is so small. (I always laugh at the people will those huge Biology revision guides, and mine is no bigger than at GCSE....). It's not easy, but it's really worth it.

    I swapped it from Art on enrolment day, and so glad I did.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by physicsfuntimes)
    Like people have said, with a fair grasp on maths (AS maths does help, just gets you happier with number and rearranging equations, is handy but it's not essential).. but in our year, half my physics class gave up after six months and failed the exams, the other half really liked it and did fine. Maybe it's partly our teachers who seem to think physics is the hardest subject, therefore we need to teach ourselves and they sat around mocking us for being rubbish...

    It took til easter for things to click, get my head round it all, and then it was fine. Just make sure you'd be okay dropping it (ie, take four subjects so you can drop physics and still have three left) so if you do try it and find out you're not a fan, and no big loss. If you do like it though (and liking it makes it so much easier/worth the effort) then brilliant, you've gained a fantastic A level! I may be a teeny bit biased, but.. good luck, whatever you do
    Thats a really great reply! Thankyou very much I'll take it i think, and see what happens
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    There's not a great deal of theory to learn, but it can be hard to grasp. Your maths needs to be pretty good, but you don't need to be a mathematical genius (just make sure you're good a using standard form and rearranging formulas). I don't think it's THAT hard as a subject, but the exam questions can be really strange, you get some real easy ones, and some really really difficult ones. You have to be quite logically minded, and it's not a subject you can just cram information with. If you're fairly good at grasping scientific theories, then go for it - it's a very interesting subject.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I didn't find it a massive jump to be honest, just be open to what you're being told. Lots of the things you've been told in the past will go out the window. I've found the jump to A2 ok, but I've just got into the magnetic and electric fields module, and it is pretty tricky to understand. This will change depending on which exam board you're with, but in general you will always find one or two things a bit tricky. It's started to 'click' a bit more now, so it just takes time.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: March 22, 2011

University open days

  1. University of Cambridge
    Christ's College Undergraduate
    Wed, 26 Sep '18
  2. Norwich University of the Arts
    Undergraduate Open Days Undergraduate
    Fri, 28 Sep '18
  3. Edge Hill University
    Faculty of Health and Social Care Undergraduate
    Sat, 29 Sep '18
Poll
Which accompaniment is best?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.