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    Hiya (sorry if this is the wrong forum)
    can anyone give me an insite into either of these two courses because I'm pretty stuck, I mean i have got a while to thinking about it but I know I should be deciding soon.

    Anyways...
    Basically I don't know which degree to choose, untill recently I really was set on biology but job prospects are putting me off. I love all areas of the subject but mainly the human side though i'm aware there isn't a high chance of a good paying job (in biology not something else) without further study which concerns me. I'll be the first one in my family going to university so I want it too be worth it :P

    Then on the other side there's radiography which I've been looking into
    I'm getting some work exp in the april half term to see what it's like, but I think it's something i'd really be interested in. Tuition fees are payed for, good job oppertunities (i've been told) , lots of chances to do futher study,and the course covers my favourite areas of biology like physiology plus some psychology + entery requirements are lower

    So basically should I go for biology, having no clue what I'd do after? or radiography to be safe?

    sorry for any spelling/grammar failures
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    (Original post by emma363)
    Hiya (sorry if this is the wrong forum)
    can anyone give me an insite into either of these two courses because I'm pretty stuck, I mean i have got a while to thinking about it but I know I should be deciding soon.

    Anyways...
    Basically I don't know which degree to choose, untill recently I really was set on biology but job prospects are putting me off. I love all areas of the subject but mainly the human side though i'm aware there isn't a high chance of a good paying job (in biology not something else) without further study which concerns me. I'll be the first one in my family going to university so I want it too be worth it :P

    Then on the other side there's radiography which I've been looking into
    I'm getting some work exp in the april half term to see what it's like, but I think it's something i'd really be interested in. Tuition fees are payed for, good job oppertunities (i've been told) , lots of chances to do futher study,and the course covers my favourite areas of biology like physiology plus some psychology + entery requirements are lower

    So basically should I go for biology, having no clue what I'd do after? or radiography to be safe?

    sorry for any spelling/grammar failures
    I was studying radiography.

    Dropped out to study biomedical science.

    Radiography was good, but during the placements I found it far too easy a job. Literally position the patient, set exposure (which are all stored, you just press a button for the part of the body being imaged) and then press the xray button.

    Thats was it.

    We had hours of lectures on how xray tubes work and human anatomy - fair enough that was interesting, but I never felt like I was applying my knowledge while on placement.

    Biology and radiography are two massively different degrees, and massively different jobs.

    Job availability: The Torys are going to destroy the NHS, and private practice radiography jobs are scarce.

    Further study: There are things you can do in radiography, like masters degrees to specialise in certain disciplines within radiography, such as ultrasound, CT, MRI etc.

    Choose carefully, you should do the degree you want to do, don't worry about jobs because alot could change in the 3 years you will be in university!!
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    (Original post by Jack7Richards)
    I was studying radiography.

    Dropped out to study biomedical science.

    Radiography was good, but during the placements I found it far too easy a job. Literally position the patient, set exposure (which are all stored, you just press a button for the part of the body being imaged) and then press the xray button.

    Thats was it.

    We had hours of lectures on how xray tubes work and human anatomy - fair enough that was interesting, but I never felt like I was applying my knowledge while on placement.

    Biology and radiography are two massively different degrees, and massively different jobs.

    Job availability: The Torys are going to destroy the NHS, and private practice radiography jobs are scarce.

    Further study: There are things you can do in radiography, like masters degrees to specialise in certain disciplines within radiography, such as ultrasound, CT, MRI etc.

    Choose carefully, you should do the degree you want to do, don't worry about jobs because alot could change in the 3 years you will be in university!!
    Helpful, thanks
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    Have you looked into therapeutic radiography( radiotherapy) which is totally different from diagnostic. I'm a 3rd year radiotherapy student and I can tell you that there are so many new technologies and developments in this career. Google 'varian' and take a look at the machines that we use to treat cancer it will give you an idea as to what we do
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    (Original post by Jack7Richards)
    I was studying radiography.

    Dropped out to study biomedical science.

    Radiography was good, but during the placements I found it far too easy a job. Literally position the patient, set exposure (which are all stored, you just press a button for the part of the body being imaged) and then press the xray button.

    Thats was it.

    We had hours of lectures on how xray tubes work and human anatomy - fair enough that was interesting, but I never felt like I was applying my knowledge while on placement.

    Biology and radiography are two massively different degrees, and massively different jobs.

    Job availability: The Torys are going to destroy the NHS, and private practice radiography jobs are scarce.

    Further study: There are things you can do in radiography, like masters degrees to specialise in certain disciplines within radiography, such as ultrasound, CT, MRI etc.

    Choose carefully, you should do the degree you want to do, don't worry about jobs because alot could change in the 3 years you will be in university!!
    I think that it is good to have an open debate about what is really involved in jobs,because university faculties are only really interested in filling places,rather than any real commitment to students (slightly extreme view i know) . I would like to see more surveys done about job satisfaction ,so that potential students can have a better idea of what certain jobs involve.
    Having said that i think that jack's assessment of radiography is a little bit unfair in the sense that i know general radiographers who are extremely competent ,but still find certain things difficult after 30 years, and will openly say that they still learn something new every day. One of the biggest problems we have at the moment is that its difficult to cover all the imaging modalities within 3/4 years ,so that there is a wider problem that it takes newly qualified radiographers longer to feel fairly comfortable in their radiography.
    With regard to not using the anatomy ,apart from the fact that you can't be a good radiographer without good anatomical understanding,don't forget that every student radiographer now ,will be expected to be red-flagging their x-rays as a routine part of their job, and this will soon be replaced by provisional report writing ,leading to formal reporting ,and then consultant grade.Studentship is as much about preparing for this lifetime progression as it is about being able to competently do a certain job on qualification.
    There is a lot to gripe about in radiography. If you watch the hospital soaps you will barely see a radiographer ,but when you enter hospital life you will quickly discover how important the imaging dept is to medical practise,but you can expect to get little recognition for this. Another gripe which you may not appreciate as a student is that radiography is one of that small group of hospital professions that gives 24/7 cover. This could mean that you can expect night work,weekend work, and bank holidays for the rest of your career. If you want a family life, or to carry on playing footie or whatever then don't do radiography.There are many other allied health professions that are still essentially doing office hours. In one way this gave radiography an edge because traditionally radiographers have been earning at least 30 per cent extra per year on top of basic salaries to cover unsocial hours.
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    (Original post by Peace'n'loveman)
    I think that it is good to have an open debate about what is really involved in jobs,because university faculties are only really interested in filling places,rather than any real commitment to students (slightly extreme view i know) . I would like to see more surveys done about job satisfaction ,so that potential students can have a better idea of what certain jobs involve.
    Having said that i think that jack's assessment of radiography is a little bit unfair in the sense that i know general radiographers who are extremely competent ,but still find certain things difficult after 30 years, and will openly say that they still learn something new every day. One of the biggest problems we have at the moment is that its difficult to cover all the imaging modalities within 3/4 years ,so that there is a wider problem that it takes newly qualified radiographers longer to feel fairly comfortable in their radiography.
    With regard to not using the anatomy ,apart from the fact that you can't be a good radiographer without good anatomical understanding,don't forget that every student radiographer now ,will be expected to be red-flagging their x-rays as a routine part of their job, and this will soon be replaced by provisional report writing ,leading to formal reporting ,and then consultant grade.Studentship is as much about preparing for this lifetime progression as it is about being able to competently do a certain job on qualification.
    There is a lot to gripe about in radiography. If you watch the hospital soaps you will barely see a radiographer ,but when you enter hospital life you will quickly discover how important the imaging dept is to medical practise,but you can expect to get little recognition for this. Another gripe which you may not appreciate as a student is that radiography is one of that small group of hospital professions that gives 24/7 cover. This could mean that you can expect night work,weekend work, and bank holidays for the rest of your career. If you want a family life, or to carry on playing footie or whatever then don't do radiography.There are many other allied health professions that are still essentially doing office hours. In one way this gave radiography an edge because traditionally radiographers have been earning at least 30 per cent extra per year on top of basic salaries to cover unsocial hours.
    Sorry, I didn't mean to sound unfair, im fully aware of how competent radiographers are, they are HPC registered afterall.... That was just my experience of the role, just wasn't for me, I needed a bigger challenge.
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    (Original post by Blueberrypop)
    Have you looked into therapeutic radiography( radiotherapy) which is totally different from diagnostic. I'm a 3rd year radiotherapy student and I can tell you that there are so many new technologies and developments in this career. Google 'varian' and take a look at the machines that we use to treat cancer it will give you an idea as to what we do
    okay i'll check it out
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    (Original post by Peace'n'loveman)
    I think that it is good to have an open debate about what is really involved in jobs,because university faculties are only really interested in filling places,rather than any real commitment to students (slightly extreme view i know) . I would like to see more surveys done about job satisfaction ,so that potential students can have a better idea of what certain jobs involve.
    Having said that i think that jack's assessment of radiography is a little bit unfair in the sense that i know general radiographers who are extremely competent ,but still find certain things difficult after 30 years, and will openly say that they still learn something new every day. One of the biggest problems we have at the moment is that its difficult to cover all the imaging modalities within 3/4 years ,so that there is a wider problem that it takes newly qualified radiographers longer to feel fairly comfortable in their radiography.
    With regard to not using the anatomy ,apart from the fact that you can't be a good radiographer without good anatomical understanding,don't forget that every student radiographer now ,will be expected to be red-flagging their x-rays as a routine part of their job, and this will soon be replaced by provisional report writing ,leading to formal reporting ,and then consultant grade.Studentship is as much about preparing for this lifetime progression as it is about being able to competently do a certain job on qualification.
    There is a lot to gripe about in radiography. If you watch the hospital soaps you will barely see a radiographer ,but when you enter hospital life you will quickly discover how important the imaging dept is to medical practise,but you can expect to get little recognition for this. Another gripe which you may not appreciate as a student is that radiography is one of that small group of hospital professions that gives 24/7 cover. This could mean that you can expect night work,weekend work, and bank holidays for the rest of your career. If you want a family life, or to carry on playing footie or whatever then don't do radiography.There are many other allied health professions that are still essentially doing office hours. In one way this gave radiography an edge because traditionally radiographers have been earning at least 30 per cent extra per year on top of basic salaries to cover unsocial hours.
    thanks nice to hear a different prospective!
 
 
 
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