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    If in the future, we need to move away from financial services, then why not offer tax breaks, or even eliminate all business taxes to the manufacturing/secondary sector?

    This would make UK goods more competitive, since the input costs would be lower. I don't see manufacturing as some supreme good like most people do, but it should really be about a fifth of national income IMO.
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    Do you think there's a genuine desire to move away from financial services? To my mind, the chance to make longterm changes to the sector has passed by and, while there was a brief period where there was an appetite for reform, the industry has ridden out the worst of the storm. As such, in relation to your topic, I think the government (and previous ones) see little value in the manufacturing sector and while any downgrading of the financial sector would necessitate it (manufacturing) being made stronger, that looks extremely unlikely for the the foreseeable future.
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    Tax breaks won't make input costs lower they will just help increase profit margins so attract investment.

    Really if we want manufacturing to be more competitive we would have to have lower wages in the UK manufacturing sector. This is not going to happen because
    a) minimum wage
    b) skills shortage

    the solution, which would not be politically popular with the Daily Mail types, is that we would have to rebuild our manufacturing sector with cheap immigrant labour like we did after the war
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    Even with tax breaks, we can't compete with the extremely cheap labour available in China, Taiwan and other countries in that area. We have the minimum wage and various health and safety laws which bumps up the production price here that doesn't exist elsewhere.
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    To boost the manufacture in this country, why don't we import less and use british made products? Importing steel from China to build Olymic stadiums isn't doing us any good. It may be more expensive, but all this ranting about British jobs for British workers could be silenced by creating jobs that were lost when the steel works up north were closed down.
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    If you mean cheap manufacturing goods then there is no chance in hell. We just cannot physically compete with the likes of China or other Asian countries. It just isn't possible. However, if you mean high quality, high cost manufacturing goods, well we already have a sector. Rolls Royce fit into this category nicely and I would welcome policies designed to encourage more high quality manufacturing in this country.

    This is why this whole climate change thing could be worth a bit of money to the UK. Although I despair at the idea of the UK investing billions into using "green" technologies as a means of generating power, I actually think it would be a good idea to invest billions into developing a sector in this country for it. In other words, produce the goods but don't use them. Other countries are foolishly trying to meet targets for climate change and we should make money from it.
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    (Original post by Teaddict)
    This is why this whole climate change thing could be worth a bit of money to the UK. Although I despair at the idea of the UK investing billions into using "green" technologies as a means of generating power, I actually think it would be a good idea to invest billions into developing a sector in this country for it. In other words, produce the goods but don't use them. Other countries are foolishly trying to meet targets for climate change and we should make money from it.
    I agree with this. I wouldn't look at it as 'climate change' technology, it's an issue of renewable technology v non-renewable technology. Fossil fuels are going to run out and we are running out of oil in the North Sea anyway, so developing renewables puts us one step ahead of the game, in the end everybody will have to move towards renewables as extraction costs rise and the scarce fossil fuels become more and more expensive. This is going to happen whether climate change is true or a load of crap.

    Ironically China, who are the world's big polluters, seem to have switched on to the idea of getting a lead in investing in green technologies. I doubt they have suddenly become influenced by the environmentalist movement, so the fact China has taken an interest suggests to me there's more behind it than just environmental lobbying.
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    (Original post by MagicNMedicine)
    I agree with this. I wouldn't look at it as 'climate change' technology, it's an issue of renewable technology v non-renewable technology.
    Indeed but the issue of climate change has hastened the response to energy provision and the desire for renewable energies. But then again, for all intents and purposes, I would consider waste incineration a renewable energy.

    Fossil fuels are going to run out and we are running out of oil in the North Sea anyway, so developing renewables puts us one step ahead of the game, in the end everybody will have to move towards renewables as extraction costs rise and the scarce fossil fuels become more and more expensive. This is going to happen whether climate change is true or a load of crap.
    Absolutely - the issue is what do we replace fossil fuels with? I for one cannot imagine generating the bulk of our power from renewables such as wind and solar; both of which are poor methods of generating power.

    Ironically China, who are the world's big polluters, seem to have switched on to the idea of getting a lead in investing in green technologies. I doubt they have suddenly become influenced by the environmentalist movement, so the fact China has taken an interest suggests to me there's more behind it than just environmental lobbying.
    Indeed. China has also made a break for Thorium-based nuclear power plants - something we should also be doing. I think more investment in fusion would be a good idea as well - there are projects going on, but shamefully they have been impacted by the spending cuts.
 
 
 
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