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Claiming benefits and doing voluntary work watch

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    What would you think of this, and why? Imagine if I received housing benefit, say £250/month, and am perfectly entitled to it according to the criteria specified by the council/government.
    Now many people object to claiming benefits and would prefer the person to earn that same money from some kind of worthless (at best) job, incorrectly assuming that a "job" must mean they're giving something back to society and helping to improve things for everyone else in some way. But actually any realistic job I could get would be of absolutely no productive use to anyone and would not, in my mind, help to improve the world at all.

    So what would you think if someone instead intentionally did voluntary work (of a helpful and productive sort, I don't mean "volunteering to shmoke weed wiv my mates LOL") up to (and beyond) a number of hours which would have earnt him the amount given in benefits were it paid work instead? Do you find that morally unacceptable? Why, what's the difference?
    Do you think it's ok, or even good?
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    I have thought about doing voluntary work to improve my chances of getting work, but I'm just not sure how much employees really value or appreciate it, especially if they say, "the right person for the right job", etc, etc.

    I was going to volunteer myself for a sports mentor helping the elderly and disabled get more exercise and get active. I was going to do that untill the job centre stopped my benefits which meant I couldn't even eat. It was my own fault of course, but two months of getting no money is not fair. That put me off volunteering. I was willing to do something productive to help me find work and the DWP pulled my only means of support.

    I know of someone who does voluntary work, by the way, at the local Cat's Rescue and has been doing so for years, but he can't find a job.
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    (Original post by Martyn*)
    I have thought about doing voluntary work to improve my chances of getting work, but I'm just not sure how much employees really value or appreciate it, especially if they say, "the right person for the right job", etc, etc.

    I was going to volunteer myself for a sports mentor helping the elderly and disabled get more exercise and get active. I was going to do that untill the job centre stopped my benefits which meant I couldn't even eat. It was my own fault of course, but two months of getting no money is not fair. That put me off volunteering. I was willing to do something productive to help me find work and the DWP pulled my only means of support.

    I know of someone who does voluntary work, by the way, at the local Cat's Rescue and has been doing so for years, but he can't find a job.
    The aim isn't to do it to help me to get a "conventional" (i.e. worthless) job, but simply to keep me busy and to help out. It would be a semi-permanent situation.
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    (Original post by cttp_ngaf)
    The aim isn't to do it to help me to get a "conventional" (i.e. worthless) job, but simply to keep me busy and to help out. It would be a semi-permanent situation.
    Okay. For me doing voluntary work would be a way of improving my job prospects. I just don't know if that method is worth much at all now; I'm just not sure whether employers would appreciate voluntary work on someone's CV unless, of course, it is relevent to the nature of the job.

    If you wanted to work as a fitness instructor, for example, but wanted to do volunatry work of that similar nature just to get some first-hand experience, the DWP would not authorise it. They say it has to be a charity shop (or registered charity) or nothing else.
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    Wtf, why would anybody be against it? As long as you're looking for a 'proper' job while you're volunteering, I don't see why it'd be an issue...
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    (Original post by ily_em)
    Wtf, why would anybody be against it? As long as you're looking for a 'proper' job while you're volunteering, I don't see why it'd be an issue...
    The DWP dictate the terms and conditions of volunteering. You're only allowed to do a specified numbers of hours, and it must be a registered charity. You can't turn up at your local gym, or pub, or off-licence and do voluntary work. It has to be a registered charity.
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    (Original post by cttp_ngaf)
    What would you think of this, and why? Imagine if I received housing benefit, say £250/month, and am perfectly entitled to it according to the criteria specified by the council/government.
    Now many people object to claiming benefits and would prefer the person to earn that same money from some kind of worthless (at best) job, incorrectly assuming that a "job" must mean they're giving something back to society and helping to improve things for everyone else in some way. But actually any realistic job I could get would be of absolutely no productive use to anyone and would not, in my mind, help to improve the world at all.

    So what would you think if someone instead intentionally did voluntary work (of a helpful and productive sort, I don't mean "volunteering to shmoke weed wiv my mates LOL") up to (and beyond) a number of hours which would have earnt him the amount given in benefits were it paid work instead? Do you find that morally unacceptable? Why, what's the difference?
    Do you think it's ok, or even good?
    I'd rather the JSA went to somebody working a voluntary job for a good cause than to somebody who can't be bothered to get a job and purposefully performs poorly at interviews to not get one and stay on the JSA.

    Besides, that is what the JSA is for - people who are actively seeking a job, which presumably you're doing, whether it requires building experience or whatever.
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    (Original post by Martyn*)
    Okay. For me doing voluntary work would be a way of improving my job prospects. I just don't know if that method is worth much at all now; I'm just not sure whether employers would appreciate voluntary work on someone's CV unless, of course, it is relevent to the nature of the job.

    If you wanted to work as a fitness instructor, for example, but wanted to do volunatry work of that similar nature just to get some first-hand experience, the DWP would not authorise it. They say it has to be a charity shop (or registered charity) or nothing else.
    Is it not better to get out and do something useful than to sit in the house dreaming up conspiracy theories all day?
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    (Original post by ily_em)
    As long as you're looking for a 'proper' job while you're volunteering
    Why ought I to look for a paid job?

    (Original post by DarkWhite)
    I'd rather the JSA went to somebody working a voluntary job for a good cause than to somebody who can't be bothered to get a job and purposefully performs poorly at interviews to not get one and stay on the JSA.

    Besides, that is what the JSA is for - people who are actively seeking a job, which presumably you're doing, whether it requires building experience or whatever.
    I specifically mentioned housing benefit because that comes with no obligations about finding work. I don't claim JSA, but could (and maybe "should") but then I'd be contravening the regulations about how I'm allowed to work and how I have to be seeking paid employment, which complicated the issue.
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    I specifically mentioned housing benefit because that comes with no obligations about finding work. I don't claim JSA, but could (and maybe "should") but then I'd be contravening the regulations about how I'm allowed to work and how I have to be seeking paid employment, which complicated the issue.[/QUOTE]

    Ah, sorry, missed that part. Nonetheless, I'd rather housing benefit went to somebody giving their time, dedication and committment to a charitable role or voluntary position than to somebody who pretends or doesn't even bother to find a job.

    If you'd have to break the rules to get JSA, don't bother, but if it turns out you're entitled to it, I'd be more than happy for my taxes to go your way.
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    (Original post by Martyn*)
    The DWP dictate the terms and conditions of volunteering. You're only allowed to do a specified numbers of hours, and it must be a registered charity. You can't turn up at your local gym, or pub, or off-licence and do voluntary work. It has to be a registered charity.
    I am volunteering at a hospital, during meal times and also at a women's centre. The total number of hours per week is 3. Would the Job Centre be against it as a hospital is not a registered charity. :confused::confused:
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    There is a lot of uninformed rubbish being spouted on here. Understandable when Job Centre staff themselves don't even know the regulations. Anyone who has had benefit stopped because they are volunteering should refer the staff to their own guidance sheet DWP 1023 (you can google it to download) which states you can volunteer and get benefits, Further more the notion that you can only volunteer for charity work is utter bunkum.
    DWP 1023 says you may volunteer for:
    a charity, voluntary organisation or community group

    a publicsector organisation, like your local council

    a social enterprise supporting your local community, or

    a local business.

    and still get benefit as long as you are looking for full time work and can get to an interview and/ take up a job in the prescribed period.
    Another myth is the 16 hour rule. This was abolished years ago and even when it existed never applied to JSA, only invalidity benefit.
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    (Original post by Martyn*)
    The DWP dictate the terms and conditions of volunteering. You're only allowed to do a specified numbers of hours, and it must be a registered charity. You can't turn up at your local gym, or pub, or off-licence and do voluntary work. It has to be a registered charity.
    Utter rubbish, see my previous post and look at DWP1023 yourself.
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    its not about helping society its about paying tax's instead of just having them spent on you....
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    ..and if you can't get a job you suggest people just sit on their arses do you?
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    not at all the thread creator was saying about not doing 'job he could get would be of absolutely no productive use to anyone and would not, in my mind, help to improve the world at all.' and instead doing volunteer work

    if you cant get job then yes volunteer but you shouldn't pick an choose between what jobs you believe are necessary and what you deem aren't a job is a job at the end of the day
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    (Original post by hypocriticaljap)
    Utter rubbish, see my previous post and look at DWP1023 yourself.
    You tell that to the Job Centre then because they won't allow me to do voluntary work unless it's with a registered charity.
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    (Original post by py0alb)
    Is it not better to get out and do something useful than to sit in the house dreaming up conspiracy theories all day?
    At least in the house you're relatively safe. As soon as you walk down the path and close the gate? They're watching you
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    (Original post by Martyn*)
    You tell that to the Job Centre then because they won't allow me to do voluntary work unless it's with a registered charity.
    I did.
    They tried to stop mine.
    Unlike you I got off my backside, did a bit of research, put my knowledge of DWP1023 in writing and got JSA immediately reinstated.
    Demand you see a senior staff member, not one of the brain deads that weren't clever enough to work for SFE!

    Have you even tried googling DWP1023 and reading it?
    You're obviously a bit dim so here's a direct link.

    http://webarchive.nationalarchives.g...cs/dwp1023.pdf

    Read and be amazed!
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    (Original post by hypocriticaljap)
    I did.
    They tried to stop mine.
    Unlike you I got off my backside, did a bit of research, put my knowledge of DWP1023 in writing and got JSA immediately reinstated.
    Demand you see a senior staff member, not one of the brain deads that weren't clever enough to work for SFE!

    Have you even tried googling DWP1023 and reading it?
    You're obviously a bit dim so here's a direct link.

    http://webarchive.nationalarchives.g...cs/dwp1023.pdf

    Read and be amazed!
    I actually saw the manager there and she told me straight that if I wanted to do work experience in a gym, I would have to sign-off JSA because it would be classed as work and not volunteering. She also said it must be a registered charity. Of course, I accepted her word as authority; what reason would I have to question her authority?
 
 
 
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