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    Im not saying that I need big money just for being diabetic here...... i wouldnt do this if i wasnt going to uni.
    Its just I thought of it as a way to keep uni costs down, I totally agree that I dont need any more than any other person. Would just be nice to have a little extra money at uni
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    (Original post by Xristina)
    People with diabetes need to be extremely careful with their diet. I have seen like a million students on TSR saying that they basically live of noodles and pasta. A diabetic can't do that, they need to have a balanced diet with meat etc. I personally think this is a huge additional expense. And yes, of course everyone would like to have the ability to eat meat every day etc but for these people it's imperative. Pasta is a big no no for diabetics and it's the main meal for most students lol
    How is this the same as saying you were adopted?
    Actually for type 1 diabetics (which I'm assuming OP is due to his age), carbohydrates are the main food group. A diabetic's ideal meal should be 50% carbs, 30% veg and 20% meat. I'm diabetic and thinking of going veggie in uni for the health benefits and because I don't like meat generally.

    There could be an argument about food though.
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    (Original post by Muffinz)
    Actually for type 1 diabetics (which I'm assuming OP is due to his age), carbohydrates are the main food group. A diabetic's ideal meal should be 50% carbs, 30% veg and 20% meat. I'm diabetic and thinking of going veggie in uni for the health benefits and because I don't like meat generally.

    There could be an argument about food though.
    Of course carb is vital - human beings can't live without it. But as you know, it's the carb (or simpler sugars) we eat that have to be factored into our insulin doses, and the quantity and glycaemic index of the carb we eat is what determines how our blood sugars react.

    I've found that if I inject with a meal, most types of pasta (rice too) can cause me to hypo in the short term (>1 hour) and/or have a prolonged spike in the long term (2-5 hours). That's why I try to eat small amounts of slow absorption starchy carbs like pasta and rice. Perhaps Xristina has the same issue, thus the comment about pasta's unsuitability for diabetics.
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    If you mean fat diabetes you don't deserve any.
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    (Original post by ipulledhermione)
    what is a jipo?

    sounds..
    I think he means - jipo/gypo as in derived from the word gypsy.

    So you can probably get the context
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    (Original post by King_Duncan)
    Of course carb is vital - human beings can't live without it. But as you know, it's the carb (or simpler sugars) we eat that have to be factored into our insulin doses, and the quantity and glycaemic index of the carb we eat is what determines how our blood sugars react.

    I've found that if I inject with a meal, most types of pasta (rice too) can cause me to hypo in the short term (>1 hour) and/or have a prolonged spike in the long term (2-5 hours). That's why I try to eat small amounts of slow absorption starchy carbs like pasta and rice. Perhaps Xristina has the same issue, thus the comment about pasta's unsuitability for diabetics.
    I don't know about you, but my dietician gave me a chart of slow-releasing cards, mid-speed and quick releasing. If you have that info then you shouldn't have any issues... Generally we need carbs to keep blood sugar levels stable and provide energy.
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    (Original post by King_Duncan)
    Of course carb is vital - human beings can't live without it. But as you know, it's the carb (or simpler sugars) we eat that have to be factored into our insulin doses, and the quantity and glycaemic index of the carb we eat is what determines how our blood sugars react.

    I've found that if I inject with a meal, most types of pasta (rice too) can cause me to hypo in the short term (>1 hour) and/or have a prolonged spike in the long term (2-5 hours). That's why I try to eat small amounts of slow absorption starchy carbs like pasta and rice. Perhaps Xristina has the same issue, thus the comment about pasta's unsuitability for diabetics.
    I am not diabetic. My grandfather is and I remember him saying he can't eat a lot of pasta etc.
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    (Original post by Pedrobear)
    If you mean fat diabetes you don't deserve any.
    what do you mean by "fat diabetes"?

    I have type 2 diabetes and i'm 23. I control it with a low carbohydrate diet and by several injections a day. It takes time and effort, but it's nothing to do with fat.
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    (Original post by Muffinz)
    Actually for type 1 diabetics (which I'm assuming OP is due to his age), carbohydrates are the main food group. A diabetic's ideal meal should be 50% carbs, 30% veg and 20% meat. I'm diabetic and thinking of going veggie in uni for the health benefits and because I don't like meat generally.

    There could be an argument about food though.
    Many diabetics avoid pasta and avoid having too much carbohydrate in their diet... you can get energy from other food groups, and eating lower levels of carbohydrate means taking less insulin, leaving less room for error.

    The more carbohydrate you eat, the more insulin you need to take, and the more room for error there is in that dose.

    Of course we need some carbohydrate, though we could survive without, but it should certainly not be the main food group.
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    To add my input here: I am Diabetic, and I eat quite a lot of pasta.


    Sorry. Just putting it out there.
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    (Original post by Muffinz)
    Actually for type 1 diabetics (which I'm assuming OP is due to his age), carbohydrates are the main food group. A diabetic's ideal meal should be 50% carbs, 30% veg and 20% meat. I'm diabetic and thinking of going veggie in uni for the health benefits and because I don't like meat generally.

    There could be an argument about food though.
    My mum's a diabetic vegetarian and she has no problems with not eating meat and controlling her blood sugars, just so you know. As long as you're still eating a fairly balanced diet you're ok.
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    (Original post by eden)
    what do you mean by "fat diabetes"?

    I have type 2 diabetes and i'm 23. I control it with a low carbohydrate diet and by several injections a day. It takes time and effort, but it's nothing to do with fat.
    Awkward.

    How can I put this...
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    I have a friend at university who is constantly complaining about being treated differently by people (or patronised) because of her illness. She has an illness (not saying what on here- she's on here) which is there, but doesn't really affect her.. but people might get the impression that it would.. if that makes any sense.

    Yet, she was on the phone to SFE PLEADING for money at the beginning of this year, pleading for DSA, despite the fact that her illness doesn't affect anything apart from having to get prescriptions- which she gets for free anyway. So she can't have it all ways.

    You should be thankful that you don't qualify for DSA- because if you DID, it'd mean that you had an illness which impacted badly on your life.

    I'm diabetic, but nobody at uni even knows about it because I'm happy that I can control it quietly.. you should be, too.
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    (Original post by Pedrobear)
    Awkward.

    How can I put this...
    i've no idea. you tell me?
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    Just apply for DSAs, if you can claim them then you get money. If you can't then you've lost nothing.
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    (Original post by SmallTownGirl)
    Just apply for DSAs, if you can claim them then you get money. If you can't then you've lost nothing.
    You don't get money.
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    (Original post by hypocriticaljap)
    You don't get money.
    Well truthfully I have no idea what I'm applying for, I've just been told by the lovely Student Support guy at Sussex that I'm most likely eligible...
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    (Original post by scriddle)
    I'm a diabetic who has just started uni. I spend around £5 a week on sugary drinks in order to keep my blood scores high enough. Although, I'm an extreme case who has very bad control! So maybe diabetics spends a LITTLE extra money, but it's not worth trying to claim anything. Ultimately, we are normal people who, if under good control, should have no extra costs.
    If you go into Boots you can buy little tubes of sugar tablets that keep for ages and don't make a mess - 3 tablets out of the ten you get are normally enough for a hypo and then you won't be spending so much on glucose control. Just stick a tube in your bag and you'll be sorted for a while xxx
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    PS Helper
    Are there any expenses that you occur that other students would not have?

    This means it is generally related to work difficulties. DSA is commonly given to people who can't see or hear properly, have mobility problems, missing lectures because of a disability, things like that.

    I feel so sorry for you having diabetes (I have epilepsy and bi-polar disorder myself so I know how handling a long term disability can affect you) but it's unlikely you'll get money so you can eat well, as that is something you incur extra as a person, not because you are a student.


    I'm sorry I don't know how much sense that made or whether I got my meaning across! You can call but I'm not sure how successful you will be - if you took your meds and had a good diet would it affect your studying?
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    Wiki Support Team
    (Original post by thru sun and rain)
    I thought all prescriptions were free for anyone with diabetes. :/
    If you're insulin or tablet controlled, yes. People who control their diabetes by diet only though, are not entitled to free prescriptions.
 
 
 
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