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Getting 5K time down watch

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    Hi all,

    I'm just getting back into running after a few months out and I'm training for the Race for Life again after doing it last year for the first time. At the moment I'm running between 4-6 miles most days of the week, but have mostly been breaking the distance up in order to ease myself back in without risking injury.

    Basically, I finished the 5k last year in about 35 minutes (in the blazing sun) which wasn't bad considering I'd not really ran much before then and I was terrified of being "boxed in" by the other participants (claustrophobic). I've just come off the treadmill after having an experimental run to see what my basic time is in the first instance and it's a terrible 39 minutes!

    I've seen the C25K program, but I think I'm a bit beyond that - I'm quite fit, it's just my endurance thats causing the problem right now because it's not been sustained for ages.

    Can anyone suggest how I might go about training to take 10 minutes off my run time? I have until May to achieve it, and I think that as long as I keep running regularly and building my distance/times up I might be able to do it.

    Thanks!
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    When you practise running on the treadmill, how exactly do you run it? Do you start off at a regular pace, then drop it down a bit slower towards the end or what?

    When I was training for a 5k race and wanted to get my time to under 30 mins, I would spend the first 10 minutes running at, what for me was a fast pace - about 11k an hour, then after the ten minutes I would drop down to a slower, jog pace and continue jogging until I reached 5k, not worrying about the time it took me just ensuring I completed the distance.

    Then each time I trained I would try and extend that first fast 10 minutes to maybe 12 minutes, and so on until the majority of the run was done at the faster pace rather than the slower pace. If you do this I would recommend mixing it up a bit by doing some consolodating sessions where you don't increase anything, and doing some random sessions where you literally spend the 5k chopping and changing between running really fast and light jogging. It would also be good to occassionally run a bit further, say 6.5k, so that you don't get too used to thinking that 5k is the 'finish' and therefore the point at which you're knackered - you should train to be able to comfortably do the 5k rather than dying at the end of it.

    I'm no fitness expert though, this is just how I went about doing it. I could eventually do it in 25 minutes but that was back in the days when I wasn't a fat *******.
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    Try mixing in some HIIT and/or hill running into your training. It'll help increase your pace for the 5k.
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    (Original post by splonk)
    When you practise running on the treadmill, how exactly do you run it? Do you start off at a regular pace, then drop it down a bit slower towards the end or what?

    When I was training for a 5k race and wanted to get my time to under 30 mins, I would spend the first 10 minutes running at, what for me was a fast pace - about 11k an hour, then after the ten minutes I would drop down to a slower, jog pace and continue jogging until I reached 5k, not worrying about the time it took me just ensuring I completed the distance.

    Then each time I trained I would try and extend that first fast 10 minutes to maybe 12 minutes, and so on until the majority of the run was done at the faster pace rather than the slower pace. If you do this I would recommend mixing it up a bit by doing some consolodating sessions where you don't increase anything, and doing some random sessions where you literally spend the 5k chopping and changing between running really fast and light jogging. It would also be good to occassionally run a bit further, say 6.5k, so that you don't get too used to thinking that 5k is the 'finish' and therefore the point at which you're knackered - you should train to be able to comfortably do the 5k rather than dying at the end of it.

    I'm no fitness expert though, this is just how I went about doing it. I could eventually do it in 25 minutes but that was back in the days when I wasn't a fat *******.

    I start off running, and can usually last five to seven minutes if I push myself. Then I'll go down to a jog or fast powerwalk for a few minutes and change back up when I've recovered from the first run.

    I will try to run for ten/fifteen minutes at a time though. At the moment, I'm finding it easier to run 1.5 miles or so in 16/17 minutes at a faster pace than the whole 5k. I can do more than 5k if I want to - five miles was my furthest but took 70 mins - but I'm used to breaking it up.

    This week I'm going to try and run 5k each day, to see if that helps improve anything and try to bring my running time up as you say...
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    Do the run in REAL LIFE treadmills are crap.

    My first ever time doing a 5K run way 28 minutes. After about 7 weeks I got it down to 21.24... Training twice a week.
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    1. Run on ground, not a treadmill (or just use the treadmill for recovery runs).
    2. Have a long run each week, nice and easy, and get it up to 8 miles.
    3. Have one interval session a week, i.e. 5 x 1k, 3 mins rest. I can PM you plenty of different combinations so you don't get fed up.
    4. Do one tempo run a week of about 2-3 miles, with a mile in total of warming up and down.
    5. As you improve, try to get out and do 2-3 miles easy between sessions. It's up to you to decide which days you go for.
    6. Have at least one day off per week.
    7. Depending on your mileage you should periodise, but it depends how serious you are about getting your time down (no extra effort on your part, but leads to better times).
 
 
 
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