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What is the most politically correct thing you've ever heard of? (PC gone mad!) watch

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    (Original post by bognor-regis)
    It really does surprise me. Why don't you explain to me why it's so offensive?

    Every newsagents/cornershop in my town is owned and run by pakistanis.

    So 'paki shop' is just descriptive. It's no different to calling it a cornershop. Or going to get a 'chinaman' (chinese take away).
    The point is: why did you need to include their race as part of the description of the shop? Why is did you feel the need to point it out to your teacher?

    Why didn't you point out that it was a shop run by people with green eyes? Or that they were left handed shopkeepers? or that they had an ear pierced? - because it doesn't matter, it has nothing to do with the shop. So why does their race?
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    So one time I'm in physics and the teacher asks 'what is the current in each of these three resistors?' They all have 6A, so I'm '6, 6, 6, coincidentally the number of the beast'. I get told off for offending Christians and such who believe in the devil. Real talk.
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    (Original post by chloeee!)
    Also, yeah I think my generation is more politically correct, or at least aware that we should be. My dad always says "coloured people" - that's a man who has lived in London his whole life. Every time he says it me and my sister are like, "Dad! You can't say coloured, you say black!" He also says half cast instead of mixed race...

    But at the same time there are a lot of politically incorrect jokes 'cracked' all the time at school etc usually based on race and I don't think anyone ever takes offence. For example, there are two girls in my History class, one of whom is a Muslim and the other black - who call each other "bomber" and "slave" - but they both know it's just a joke, obviously.
    Thats not it at all :facepalm:

    Expressions change, when your dad says 'coloured people' he's using the politically correct term from his time.

    I have all the James Bond novels written in the 50's. Hence they're written in the style of the time, he refers to any black person in phrases like 'the young negro' for example. It's not racist its just the language of the time. Infact he's using the polite term from back then (from the Spanish for black). Nowadays that term has fallen out of use and in your dads day it was replaced with 'coloured', now thats out of date and we say black instead, but already in America there was that thing about saying 'African-American' because 'black' is offensive but I don't know if thats still the case or it was just an extreme case.

    In 60 years you might have grandkids, and if you did and you said "That black man over there", they might find it equally as shocking as your dad saying 'coloured people'
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    (Original post by screenager2004)
    The point is: why did you need to include their race as part of the description of the shop? Why is did you feel the need to point it out to your teacher?

    Why didn't you point out that it was a shop run by people with green eyes? Or that they were left handed shopkeepers? or that they had an ear pierced? - because it doesn't matter, it has nothing to do with the shop. So why does their race?
    That's just being silly and oversensitive, what the op is talking about.

    If I see an Indian man, what's wrong with noticing that he's Indian? I'm sure they are proud of their heritage and ethnicity.

    Also, why do you think that noticing someone's skin colour is somehow no go, but mentioning their eye colour is fine? wtf

    In my opinion it is so much worse going around pretending everyone is white, and acting ashamed to even acknowledge that there are all sorts of different people in the world. That's true racism.

    And just for the record, the 'paki shops' are an important and valued part of my community. I'm sure there are interesting socio economic and historical reasons for that particular quirk of modern day Britain. And I think it's great. That does not logically lead to me somehow treating someone differently because of what they look like. Or does it? (No it doesn't)

    I'm not a racist, sheltered people like you who act like people should be ashamed of being different in the slightest way are the real racists.
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    (Original post by bognor-regis)
    That's just being silly and oversensitive, what the op is talking about.

    If I see an Indian man, what's wrong with noticing that he's Indian? I'm sure they are proud of their heritage and ethnicity.

    Also, why do you think that noticing someone's skin colour is somehow no go, but mentioning their eye colour is fine? wtf

    In my opinion it is so much worse going around pretending everyone is white, and acting ashamed to even acknowledge that there are all sorts of different people in the world. That's true racism.

    And just for the record, the 'paki shops' are an important and valued part of my community. I'm sure there are interesting socio economic and historical reasons for that particular quirk of modern day Britain. And I think it's great. That does not logically lead to me somehow treating someone differently because of what they look like. Or does it? (No it doesn't)

    I'm not a racist, sheltered people like you who act like people should be ashamed of being different in the slightest way are the real racists.
    Just out of interest, was that shop owned by a Pakistani family? Because if they were Indian and you called it a 'Paki' shop, they'd probably bake you in their tandoor.
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    (Original post by bognor-regis)
    If I see an Indian man, what's wrong with noticing that he's Indian? I'm sure they are proud of their heritage and ethnicity.
    Because he's got his own name, family, personality, lifestyle. He isn't just "indian" and that's the entirety of his life. You can't reduce someone down to their race, and just use their race to describe them rather than who they are.

    I am white, but I'm also a student, an employee, scottish, a Japanese language speaker, and artist, an asthmatic, a democratic socialist. I would be offended if someone chose to completely ignore all of that and just describe me as 'white' - as if that describes me at all, and you would too.

    That does not logically lead to me somehow treating someone differently because of what they look like. Or does it? (No it doesn't)
    You are treating them differently because you don't point it out when it's any other race. For example: Do you call Sainsbury's a "White supermarket" - just because it's staffed by white people? No. You call the shop by it's name. The same way, you should call the shop by it's name (Londis, Nice, Budgens etc) not "a paki shop"

    Can you really not comprehend how bad that is?
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    (Original post by Make it so.)
    Just out of interest, was that shop owned by a Pakistani family? Because if they were Indian and you called it a 'Paki' shop, they'd probably bake you in their tandoor.
    Hahahahaha

    (Original post by screenager2004)
    Because he's got his own name, family, personality, lifestyle. He isn't just "indian" and that's the entirety of his life. You can't reduce someone down to their race, and just use their race to describe them rather than who they are.

    I am white, but I'm also a student, an employee, scottish, a Japanese language speaker, and artist, an asthmatic, a democratic socialist. I would be offended if someone chose to completely ignore all of that and just describe me as 'white' - as if that describes me at all, and you would too.



    You are treating them differently because you don't point it out when it's any other race. For example: Do you call Sainsbury's a "White supermarket" - just because it's staffed by white people? No. You call the shop by it's name. The same way, you should call the shop by it's name (Londis, Nice, Budgens etc) not "a paki shop"

    Can you really not comprehend how bad that is?
    Are you trolling? How old are you?
    (Also, Muse suck)
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    (Original post by thegreatgatsby)
    Can people please not bring up the "winterval" myth. It has become a hackneyed stick to beat "political correctness" with.

    Winterval was infact a collection of christmas festivities thrown by Birmingham Council to celebrate Christmas and the regeneration of Birmingham city centre.
    I dont think people are referring JUST to the Birmingham festival. My dad is a teacher and his school dont call them christmas or easter holidays incase it offends people they call them winter and spring break.

    Which is stupid.
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    I work in a school, and a class of year 7s were playing with multilink cubes. One of them was trying to make a pattern and asked if he could trade a white cube for a black cube. The teacher screamed at him and sent him out for being racist, and never gave the student the chance to explain what was going. The kid was white btw.
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    (Original post by bognor-regis)
    Are you trolling? How old are you?
    (Also, Muse suck)
    What an intelligent response, you've really redeemed yourself there.
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    Straw "Person" instead of Straw man in the list of logical fallacies in my Critical Thinking book
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    I think PC is funny. For instance the mental health team I see isn't allowed to refer to me as a patient any more instead they have to call me a 'service user'. It really is rather silly.
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    (Original post by screenager2004)
    Political correctness has not "gone mad" - much of it is urban legend. I.e. The story about the person told to take their st Georges cross flag down for the world cup because it offended muslims NEVER ACTUALLY HAPPENED. Its a myth. Blackboards are called chalkboards to differentiate them from whiteboards - no school uses blackboards these days the dust is harmful to kids, its got nothing to do with black kids.

    Its all a myth. The only people who get upset are racists and bigots. Its good that we are taking steps against exclusive language and the uk is a much nicer place to live now that its unacceptable to call people pakis and ******* in the street or make jokes about the disabled.
    (Interesting tsr censors the n word but not "paki"!)

    Frankly I'm shocked its a sociology student doing such a stupid survey. You should know better.
    Every example has not just been made up though.

    Some examples have definitely been exaggerated, but that doesn't mean that there are no examples of political correctness being taken too far.
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    (Original post by screenager2004)
    What an intelligent response, you've really redeemed yourself there.
    I think we should agree that we have different world views and leave it at that.
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    (Original post by Jonty99)
    Every example has not just been made up though.

    Some examples have definitely been exaggerated, but that doesn't mean that there are no examples of political correctness being taken too far.
    This is usually the result of one or two people in companies making stupid buraucratic mistakes, then subsequently getting ridiculed for it in the press: not evidence of a wider social movement.
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    (Original post by screenager2004)
    This is usually the result of one or two people in companies making stupid buraucratic mistakes, then subsequently getting ridiculed for it in the press: not evidence of a wider social movement.
    Really, can you be so sure?

    Surely it'd be rather hard to say either way?
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    (Original post by screenager2004)
    Political correctness has not "gone mad" - much of it is urban legend. I.e. The story about the person told to take their st Georges cross flag down for the world cup because it offended muslims NEVER ACTUALLY HAPPENED. Its a myth. Blackboards are called chalkboards to differentiate them from whiteboards - no school uses blackboards these days the dust is harmful to kids, its got nothing to do with black kids.

    Its all a myth. The only people who get upset are racists and bigots. Its good that we are taking steps against exclusive language and the uk is a much nicer place to live now that its unacceptable to call people pakis and ******* in the street or make jokes about the disabled.
    (Interesting tsr censors the n word but not "paki"!)

    Frankly I'm shocked its a sociology student doing such a stupid survey. You should know better.
    When I was in primary school, the teacher asked us for examples of nicknames. One boy said "Packie"(which of course is pronounced exactly like "paki"), which is a short version of Patrick. She became very angry with him, and he went home quite confused. Stupid woman.
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    (Original post by chloeee!)
    Something else to add! My nephew is two and so cbeebies (?) is on in my house permenantly. Half the presenters have some sort of disability, and I'm not even exaggerating. Nearly all the children in programmes like Balamory are disabled. Is there really any need? I'm not even being rude but it looks very... Labour gone mad.
    They have 1 disabled character on one of their shows (Balamory, she's in a wheelchair) and a presenter who has only one arm, so that is a bit of an exaggeration really! I do agree that they're trying too hard to be 'pc' but it's important for children to not watch television and just see gorgeously attractive 'normal' people. The mad thing is when idiotic parents started complaining to the BBC about disabled people being on children's television!
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    Probably not being allowed to say 'brainstorm' any more. Now it's a 'thought shower'.

    Absolute facepalm.
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    (Original post by Funpeddler)
    This is true but is hardly associated with radical feminism, even the most mild feminist would surley agree that history is written from the perspective of men?
    The humour, I think, derives from the fact that the 'his' in history is not gender-related. It derives from 'histor', which originally meant 'to know'.
 
 
 
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