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Religion may become extinct in nine nations, study says watch

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    I suppose, but the foolish poster said that religion has no place in a developed country; where did the rennaissance start off? What were Newtons views on religion? What would a developed country do with those who follow religion?
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    Who will this study benefit?
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    Organised religion has always been around and, by my reckoning, always will be around - regardless of what a study says, regardless of short term population trends. I am not religious, I just see religion outliving empires time and again throughout history, and do not see an end to the trend any time near or distant.
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    (Original post by Hylean)
    Well, that's the height of stupidity right there.
    how so?
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    Whilst I wouldn't exactly be distraught if religion ended up non-existent, I would really take these results with a pinch of salt. Take Canada for example, a country with massive amounts of migration. Given that immigrants tend to be far more religious than the existing population (As far as Western countries are concerned), I find it hard to believe that religion is going to die out in Canada at any point in the near future. Likewise for Ireland & The Netherlands.
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    (Original post by Psyk)
    The opposite is also often true. In the UK in general it's pretty clear that a lot of people claim an affiliation to a religion even though they're not in any way religious.
    Very true, yet more reason why the interpretation is flawed. One can never look at a set of data without thinking about social factors which might colour the results.


    (Original post by Psyk)
    I'd imagine in Northern Ireland many people choose to associate with a religion based on their political opinions. Likewise I'd guess some people don't associate with a religion because they want to stay out of the politics associated with it. I'm just guessing though.
    The first bit is slightly backward. The religion colours the political view, not the other way round. We're not Nationalists first then Catholics, or Unionists then Protestants. We're Catholics first, then Nationalists, etc., in that we develop our religious identities before our political ones. For instance, in Northern Ireland I'd call myself protestant, so that people know my cultural background, but I'm an Irish Nationalist, and my religious affiliation is Pagan.

    Religious affiliation in Northern Ireland is just an example of social factors influencing whether people admit to it or not. For instance, studies show that there has been a directly proportionate increase in the amount of people claiming no special affiliation and the decrease in the amount of Catholics. This would suggest, and is borne out by other evidence, that Catholics in Northern Ireland feel scared of admitting to their religious affiliation because it could lead to them being killed. An extreme example, but it means that the data cannot be trusted and the interpretation is faulty.


    (Original post by Dirac Delta Function)
    how so?
    The "death" of religion is definitely an "if", not a "when", especially as science does not negate religion in the slightest. People may turn away from certain religions in the future, but religion won't die.
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    (Original post by morecambebay)
    Intolerance isnt automatically a bad thing, it depends what you are intollerant of.
    Lol you just basically spelt the same word two different ways in one sentence ("intolerance" and "intollerant").

    I'm intolerant of bad spellers, just so you know.
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    I somehow don't think this will happen.
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    people need to beleive in something, the world is a big scary place and most people arnt bright enough to grasp rationalism, existentialism, utilitarianism, humanism or whatever on an academic level (hell i dont even know what they are). its much easier to say, GOD SAYS SO.

    society needs to be ordered to protect those who cant protect themselves, might as well do it through religion, just as easy as saying SOCIETY SAYS SO, or HUMANISM SAYS SO or whatever because in the end it will be just as much mumbo jumbo to average joe down the pub.
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    Religion will never die out, there will always be people out there looking to fill their lives with dubious stories and nonsense. Just look at Scientology, it's still growing despite it being utter clap trap :/
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    (Original post by tieyourmotherdown)
    Whilst I wouldn't exactly be distraught if religion ended up non-existent, I would really take these results with a pinch of salt. Take Canada for example, a country with massive amounts of migration. Given that immigrants tend to be far more religious than the existing population (As far as Western countries are concerned), I find it hard to believe that religion is going to die out in Canada at any point in the near future. Likewise for Ireland & The Netherlands.
    I agree it wouldn't die out completely, but as more of the population stops affiliating with religion, more of the immigrants will as well. Maybe not the immigrants themselves, but their children or grandchildren who grow up with it may be influenced by it.

    I'm glad. I know people have pointed out it's not the end of religious beliefs, it's not those that ever bother me - it's the organised side of it. If you are just spiritual or like to believe in a God etc. it does no harm and it's a personal belief. Organised religion has the potential to be highly destructive and seems to be based around conditioning the followers into believing whatever they are told to believe.
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    (Original post by callum9999)
    I agree it wouldn't die out completely, but as more of the population stops affiliating with religion, more of the immigrants will as well. Maybe not the immigrants themselves, but their children or grandchildren who grow up with it may be influenced by it.
    That's true, however the decline of religion amongst 2nd, 3rd generation immigrants etc. is notoriously slower than that of existing residents. I've no doubt that this rate will increase as the rest of the population becomes more irreligious, but they do hold onto their beliefs far more than the average.

    I'm glad. I know people have pointed out it's not the end of religious beliefs, it's not those that ever bother me - it's the organised side of it. If you are just spiritual or like to believe in a God etc. it does no harm and it's a personal belief. Organised religion has the potential to be highly destructive and seems to be based around conditioning the followers into believing whatever they are told to believe.
    I 100% agree with this.
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    they are just left wing atheists that make things up to benefit ther cause.
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    (Original post by tieyourmotherdown)
    That's true, however the decline of religion amongst 2nd, 3rd generation immigrants etc. is notoriously slower than that of existing residents. I've no doubt that this rate will increase as the rest of the population becomes more irreligious, but they do hold onto their beliefs far more than the average.



    I 100% agree with this.
    True, I think it will speed up as the "natives" drop their organised religions though. Ultimately it won't die out until either immigrants stop moving in or religion in the countries they are moving from also dies out - particularly in the Middle East and Africa, HIGHLY unlikely in the next century at least!
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    Will never happen. Ever. and I'm not religious.
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    And this is a problem because.......?
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    (Original post by Sushidelight)
    A study using census data from nine countries shows that religion there is set for extinction, say researchers. The study found a steady rise in those claiming no religious affiliation.

    The team's mathematical model attempts to account for the interplay between the number of religious respondents and the social motives behind being one.

    The result, reported at the American Physical Society meeting in Dallas, US, indicates that religion will all but die out altogether in those countries.

    The team took census data stretching back as far as a century from countries in which the census queried religious affiliation: Australia, Austria, Canada, the Czech Republic, Finland, Ireland, the Netherlands, New Zealand and Switzerland.

    Nonlinear dynamics is invoked to explain a wide range of physical phenomena in which a number of factors play a part.

    One of the team, Daniel Abrams of Northwestern University, put forth a similar model in 2003 to put a numerical basis behind the decline of lesser-spoken world languages.

    At its heart is the competition between speakers of different languages, and the "utility" of speaking one instead of another.

    "The idea is pretty simple," said Richard Wiener of the Research Corporation for Science Advancement, and the University of Arizona.

    "It posits that social groups that have more members are going to be more attractive to join, and it posits that social groups have a social status or utility.

    "For example in languages, there can be greater utility or status in speaking Spanish instead of [the dying language] Quechuan in Peru, and similarly there's some kind of status or utility in being a member of a religion or not."

    Dr Wiener continued: "In a large number of modern secular democracies, there's been a trend that folk are identifying themselves as non-affiliated with religion; in the Netherlands the number was 40%, and the highest we saw was in the Czech Republic, where the number was 60%."

    The team then applied their nonlinear dynamics model, adjusting parameters for the relative social and utilitarian merits of membership of the "non-religious" category.

    They found, in a study published online, that those parameters were similar across all the countries studied, suggesting that similar behaviour drives the mathematics in all of them.

    And in all the countries, the indications were that religion was headed toward extinction.

    However, Dr Wiener told the conference that the team was working to update the model with a "network structure" more representative of the one at work in the world.

    "Obviously we don't really believe this is the network structure of a modern society, where each person is influenced equally by all the other people in society," he said.

    However, he told BBC News that he thought it was "a suggestive result".

    "It's interesting that a fairly simple model captures the data, and if those simple ideas are correct, it suggests where this might be going.

    "Obviously much more complicated things are going on with any one individual, but maybe a lot of that averages out."

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-12811197

    Christianity may die out but Islam will survive. Hardly anyone gives up Islam. Don't they kill you if you leave the religion? :rolleyes:

    Neg reps......?
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    Ah yes I forgot Christianity is an endangered beast with only billions of followers... :rolleyes:

    Well religion may die out but Jebus never will, he'll always be in my heart! :jebus:
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    Ireland....really?
 
 
 
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