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Wig and gown in pupillage? watch

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    Hi,

    I am hoping for some advice from those already in pupillage / tenancy as to whether you would need a wig and gown for a civil pupillage?

    Is it something your pupil master would expect you to have when you start? And do you ever really need it? I don't really want to shell out for one if it is really only necessary for criminal practitioners / pupils.


    Thanks!
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    (Original post by snowflake_7)
    Hi,

    I am hoping for some advice from those already in pupillage / tenancy as to whether you would need a wig and gown for a civil pupillage?

    Is it something your pupil master would expect you to have when you start? And do you ever really need it? I don't really want to shell out for one if it is really only necessary for criminal practitioners / pupils.


    Thanks!
    You'll certainly need them in some courts. I'm not sure how soon you'd need them, though.

    3. In magistrates’ courts, advocates appear without robes or wigs. Dress requirements for advocates appearing in the Supreme Court and in county courts are as follows: Queen’s Counsel wears a short wig and a silk (or stuff) gown over a court coat. Junior Counsel wear a short wig and stuff gown with bands. Solicitors and other advocates authorised under the Courts and Legal Services Act 1990 wear a black solicitor’s gown with bands; they may wear short wigs in circumstances where they would be worn by Queen’s or Junior Counsel.
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    The main reason I want to become a barrister is to wear a wig and gown
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    (Original post by resipsaloq)
    The main reason I want to become a barrister is to wear a wig and gown
    :lolwut:

    Well, at least you want to become a barrister.

    This guy wanted to wear a wig and a gown for a living too.

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    (Original post by snowflake_7)
    Hi,

    I am hoping for some advice from those already in pupillage / tenancy as to whether you would need a wig and gown for a civil pupillage?

    Is it something your pupil master would expect you to have when you start? And do you ever really need it? I don't really want to shell out for one if it is really only necessary for criminal practitioners / pupils.


    Thanks!
    You will certainly need one by the time you start your second six. There are various types of hearings where you may be required to wear your wig and gown as a civil practitioner, and as such it is absolutely essential that you own one by the time that you are on your feet.

    It is unlikely that you will require a wig and gown in your first six. In some scenarios it is possible that your pupil master may want you to wear your wig and gown when the advocates in the case are, though this is more likely in a criminal pupillage.

    Overall the simple fact of the matter is that you require a wig and gown irrespective of what type of pupillage you acquire. Whilst you may get away without needing anything in your first six, I would recommend acquiring a wig and gown before you start pupillage irrespective.
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    (Original post by jjarvis)
    3. In magistrates’ courts, advocates appear without robes or wigs. Dress requirements for advocates appearing in the Supreme Court and in county courts are as follows: Queen’s Counsel wears a short wig and a silk (or stuff) gown over a court coat. Junior Counsel wear a short wig and stuff gown with bands. Solicitors and other advocates authorised under the Courts and Legal Services Act 1990 wear a black solicitor’s gown with bands; they may wear short wigs in circumstances where they would be worn by Queen’s or Junior Counsel.
    I don't know where this information has been acquired from, but it is remarkably unclear. This extract deals with the requirements for wearing wigs and gowns in cases that already require them, but it is not the case that every County Court hearing (for example) requires the advocates to be robed. Indeed, most County Court hearings do not require it.
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    (Original post by Crazy Jamie)
    I don't know where this information has been acquired from, but it is remarkably unclear. This extract deals with the requirements for wearing wigs and gowns in cases that already require them, but it is not the case that every County Court hearing (for example) requires the advocates to be robed. Indeed, most County Court hearings do not require it.
    It is remarkably unclear because ever since the Civil Procedure Rules were introduced the position has been very unclear.

    It all stems from the fact that the CPR swept away the distinction between "in court" and "in chambers" in favour of "in public" and " in private" but robing practice largely follows the old distinction.

    Generally speaking therefore in order to answer as a matter of principle, rather than as a set of arbitrary rules, whether an advocate should be robed, one needs to know where such a case would have been heard before 1999.
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    Has anyone with a gown bought from one of the online Australian wig and gown makers? Or know anyone that has? I'm tempted as it's a significant saving on the Ede's price, but concerned about the quality...
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    (Original post by resipsaloq)
    The main reason I want to become a barrister is to wear a wig and gown
    Many people are tricked into going down the barrister route due to delusions of tradition and standing. I can't help but feel that anyone choosing their career based on that will most likely struggle Don't think you would enjoy the bar because it seems traditional (also because solicitors are gaining equally high rights and will look indistinguishable from barristers in court dress before the end of your career)
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    (Original post by Crazy Jamie)
    You will certainly need one by the time you start your second six. There are various types of hearings where you may be required to wear your wig and gown as a civil practitioner, and as such it is absolutely essential that you own one by the time that you are on your feet.
    This is not strictly true. I know one junior tenant in a top civil set who has been on his feet for nearly a year and doesn't own a wig and gown. Most of his practice is in the county courts and on the very rare occasions he's in the High Court he just borrows the kit from other members of chambers.

    Why he doesn't just buy one is beyond me though - £50k+ pupillage award and doing rather nicely as a tenant would suggest that means aren't an issue!
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    (Original post by pupillagehunt)
    This is not strictly true. I know one junior tenant in a top civil set who has been on his feet for nearly a year and doesn't own a wig and gown. Most of his practice is in the county courts and on the very rare occasions he's in the High Court he just borrows the kit from other members of chambers.

    Why he doesn't just buy one is beyond me though - £50k+ pupillage award and doing rather nicely as a tenant would suggest that means aren't an issue!
    Each to their own, though personally I wouldn't want to be borrowing a wig and gown from another member of Chambers every time I need one. The fact remains that even with your example he does need a wig and gown, he just gets by without owning one. Not a state of affairs that I would be particularly comfortable with, as well as it seems to suit him.
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    (Original post by ForKicks)
    Many people are tricked into going down the barrister route due to delusions of tradition and standing. I can't help but feel that anyone choosing their career based on that will most likely struggle Don't think you would enjoy the bar because it seems traditional (also because solicitors are gaining equally high rights and will look indistinguishable from barristers in court dress before the end of your career)
    Thanks very much for your advice. I was joking. I wish to become a barrister because I find law fascinating and really enjoy advocacy.
 
 
 
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