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    I have a media law open book exam in May and I'm starting to stress as I've never sat an open book exam before! I have my lecture handouts and the notes I've made in lectures but i'm unsure as to how else i should prepare. The first half of the course's reading was set from a specific book which I have, but the second term's work was mainly journals and a few scanned extracts from various books. I'm not sure if i should waste time making notes from the book as I can take the book itself in? Sorry for warbling on but any advise as to how to prepare/organise/revise would be much appreciated.
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    My technique is to revise it as if it were any other exam and if having the book in front of you helps, then you're on a winner.
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    So you would make revision notes as if it was closed book? Would you print every article/website that has been part of the course reading in case a question comes up on a particular one?
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    Yes of course! It's still an exam, the fact it's open book I have always treated as a bonus...
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    Hello, I've got a history open book exam too
    What i find the most useful is to make general revision notes (mindmaps are good) for each topic. Then you have a good overview and general idea of each section, and in the exam, you can quickly scan this and it should jog your memory. Also, I'm going to make a list of quotes for each key section, and put it at the front of my folder.
    Basically, organisation is key, so when it comes to the exam, my folder will be up to date, and i can easily find stuff in it

    Good luck for your exam!! hope this helps
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    I think it would be helpful to take concise notes in to remind you of cases. It is worth revising a bit differently - e.g there is no reason to put much effort into memorising the names of cases when you can simply refer to them. Though I wouldn't rely on stuff you bring in overly much, the problem with this kind of exam is that, like other exams, you are extremely time pressured so anything you can't look up in 5 seconds is useless.
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    Thanks everyone - it seems like such a subjective technique. Someone I spoke to who did an open book LPC didn't make any notes on the reading but instead photocopied it and highlighted/stickynoted his folder so he'd know where each piece of information is. Will try and do what everyone has suggested - cheers!
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    (Original post by MediterraneanX)
    Thanks everyone - it seems like such a subjective technique. Someone I spoke to who did an open book LPC didn't make any notes on the reading but instead photocopied it and highlighted/stickynoted his folder so he'd know where each piece of information is. Will try and do what everyone has suggested - cheers!
    You need to remember that the LPC is very different. In the LPC, all the answers are in the course book/lecture handouts, you generally don't need your own notes, you don't need statute books and you don't need multiple textbooks. The LPC is also a bit more based on remembering facts than the LLB. I don't think you can quite use the same technique on the LLB, though I guess the same principles may apply, so whatever floats your boat.
 
 
 
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