Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I'm thinking of taking it in September. When I said that I might like to take it to the college interviewer, she basically just gave me a funny look and said it depends on my GCSE grades (I'll probably get an A* in maths, not with absolute zero effort though). I actually like maths a lot, and the thought of studying a more demanding course where I'll have to really give myself a headache trying to take apart a smaller amount of more complex concepts and understand them in depth (as opposed to learning 500+ methods and applying them like at GCSE) really appeals to me.

    Sometimes my attention lapses in lessons though. Will I be in with a bunch of 150+ IQ hyperfocused geniuses in a lesson moving at the speed of light, unable to keep up with the rest? Or is it just "more maths" (as the name suggests) and not that difficult?

    Thanks. (I know this topic has been done many times before, but I just want to hear some more opinions).
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Nooooo, just make sure u dont get bored and not revise for it every once in a while otherwise ur gonna flop
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    hey,

    i achieved an A in GCSE maths and the work i find alright, its just the amount tied in with the pace that i struggled with! however, this depends on your school. try and speak to some current FMa people at your school and get a good idea.

    the lessons can be quite fun, like a family due to the small size

    alas, if you do take it - prepare to work hard if you want good grades.
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    If you put the time in, you'll get the rewards and the only way to be sure of doing this is that you must take further maths because you like maths and not just because you're good at it. Some concepts will come naturally, but some will take time to master so if you enjoy maths and are good at it then go for it.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    I don't do it (I only do normal maths), but I know people who do. If you're really good at maths, and there are some people just are really good at maths, you'll probably find it easy like they do. If you're not naturally good at maths, you won't. There's a lot of work, I know that much, and a lot of exams (people I know had to take 4 in January!), but some people can just do it with ease.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    I got an A* at GCSE, but struggled with Further Maths a level. But that was largely due to me taking on too many a levels, and having various personal problems that stopped me being able to work properly for months.
    I understood it in class, but with everything that happened, I messed it all up in the exams.

    I'd have a look at some books? It is hard, but do-able if you have the time and patience to put lots of effort into it.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lukas1051)
    I don't do it (I only do normal maths), but I know people who do. If you're really good at maths, and there are some people just are really good at maths, you'll probably find it easy like they do. If you're not naturally good at maths, you won't. There's a lot of work, I know that much, and a lot of exams (people I know had to take 4 in January!), but some people can just do it with ease.
    Four exams in january is pretty standard when you get to A2, some of my friends had 7 exams (3/4 retakes included).

    OP, I'm doing AS further in year 13 and yes you're with the 'geniuses' who will go at a fast pace, but that doesn't stop you getting on at a slower pace, if you enjoy maths now, go for it
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by eat)
    I'm thinking of taking it in September. When I said that I might like to take it to the college interviewer, she basically just gave me a funny look and said it depends on my GCSE grades (I'll probably get an A* in maths, not with absolute zero effort though). I actually like maths a lot, and the thought of studying a more demanding course where I'll have to really give myself a headache trying to take apart a smaller amount of more complex concepts and understand them in depth (as opposed to learning 500+ methods and applying them like at GCSE) really appeals to me.

    Sometimes my attention lapses in lessons though. Will I be in with a bunch of 150+ IQ hyperfocused geniuses in a lesson moving at the speed of light, unable to keep up with the rest? Or is it just "more maths" (as the name suggests) and not that difficult?

    Thanks. (I know this topic has been done many times before, but I just want to hear some more opinions).


    I think you should be fine as you enjoy math so you'll be more willing to put in the time required to do well. It is important to pay attention during lessons so that you get the concept and go home and do sums so that you can spot your weaknesses and get them clarified then and there rather than piling them up.
    Further math is not as terrible as people make it sound and if you enjoy math, I think you'll enjoy it.
    I was terrified at the start of the year and didn't much like math at GCSE but A'levels is a completely different experience.
    I quite enjoy the challenge and the way the modules are structured, especially C1 to FP2's (Pure Math) gradual increase in difficulty.

    Basically, it is doable, you've just got to put the effort.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I've found this year that most of the chapters in Further Pure 1 aren't exactly more advanced or harder mathematics topics than in the Core modules, but rather it's just more maths. It's true that you need to be dedicated - the pace at my school is really good, it's not too quick and we have time to make sure everyone understands it, but there is only 10 of us on the course.

    Speak to the maths teachers who know your abilities and have a look through some of the textbooks if you can as well as speaking to any students in your school who have done Further Maths as they'll know first hand what the pace and teaching is like.

    On the maths front, I've found Further Maths a lot more interesting than normal maths (I'm doing Core 1 & 2, Mechanics 1, Further Pure 1 and Decisions 1 & 2 this year). So if you feel you're up to it, I'd really consider it, especially as you can just do it for AS if you want.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AquilaXenon)
    I've found this year that most of the chapters in Further Pure 1 aren't exactly more advanced or harder mathematics topics than in the Core modules, but rather it's just more maths. It's true that you need to be dedicated - the pace at my school is really good, it's not too quick and we have time to make sure everyone understands it, but there is only 10 of us on the course.

    Speak to the maths teachers who know your abilities and have a look through some of the textbooks if you can as well as speaking to any students in your school who have done Further Maths as they'll know first hand what the pace and teaching is like.

    On the maths front, I've found Further Maths a lot more interesting than normal maths (I'm doing Core 1 & 2, Mechanics 1, Further Pure 1 and Decisions 1 & 2 this year). So if you feel you're up to it, I'd really consider it, especially as you can just do it for AS if you want.
    Any tips on english and english lit gcses?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    For the first two ish months it was impossible, then all of a sudden I just "got" it. I think when you understand why youre doing things it is easier. But I love it and its my favorite subject
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I'm currently doing the full A-Level Further Maths this year (FP1, FP2, FP3, M2, M3, M4) along A2 Maths (C3, C4, M1). The normal AS Modules in my college (FP1, D1, M2) is fairly easy. Nothing complicated. FP1 is just composed of new maths topics on basic level, I find D1 boring and probably easier than C1, and M2 is fairly challenging. FP2, FP3, and M3 are where the fun is. You'll get these questions that will really test your maths skills. You'll get lots of AHA moments, which can be quite addictive. If you can do those 3 modules, AS & A2 Maths will seem child's play to you. M4... I've just started, so no comment yet.

    How difficult it is? To be honest, I think it's challenging, but not difficult at all. Once you understand the main and fundamental concepts, it's all down to practice. Keep on answering questions and it all becomes instinct. If you get stuck, discuss it with you teacher. Make sure you completely understand the concepts. Also, have the rule of "always be a chapter ahead," so that when it comes to lessons, you won't get as much as confused on what your teacher is saying. Last, but not the least, you gotta enjoy it.

    Goodluck.
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    It's really easy, basically the idea is you do twice as much as you would normally do, so if you love the subject go for it but if you think that maths will be enough for you then stick to normal maths but it's really good to have further maths AS and it's not that hard, just do your homework and don't get bored and you will be fine X
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    I would generally advise you to pick it up, but only if you are truly good at maths

    Plus it will put you will have a slight advantage over other applicants especially when applying for courses like Engineering, Economics, Mathematics or other maths related degree/s
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    In general, it's not that hard. You have to really get it though.
    Decisions 1 is boring but really easy (basically a term of adding up), but Mechanics 2 is a *****! It's not at all difficult once you get it, but when you don't, it seems like you never will!
    Further Pure 1 is pretty good. It is all a bit abstract with no relevant application, so it's a bit annoying to know that you have learned 13 chapters of maths that you will probably never use outside of the exam hall! Chapter 5 (trigonometry- general solutions) is really hard. Maybe it was just my class because we hadn't learned about radians yet when we did it but it seemed like the hardest thing we would ever do.
    I am taking A2 next year, and our class is going to shrink to 3 people (we have 8 now) because some of my friends don't think it's worth the effort of revising for so long to understand things they won't use. But I want to be an engineer so I need further.

    Overall, it's an interesting course, but can be a bit hard at times. If you want to take it just go for it and if you decide it's not for you after a few weeks then just drop it and take something else! (if I found it too hard I was going to drop it and take music, but it was fine)

    Hope this was helpful

    (FYI I am comparing its difficulty to my other subjects: Physics, Maths and Chemistry. Chemistry being the most difficult, then Further, then Physics, followed by Maths (which if you're doing further is a bit of a piss take))
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Extricated)
    Any tips on english and english lit gcses?
    GCSE's? Well, work hard on your coursework and make sure you get as good as you can in that, I managed to get full marks on my coursework and I think that may have been the only reason I got an A* last summer. Also, make sure you know the texts that you have to write about (where bits are etc, I spent so long looking for passages, you should get the same copy as you're working in in class - not annotated but the same book, so if you can remember page numbers that's a plus) and then it's all about your essay writing, structure and timing. If you've written a bad essay but the content is good, it doesn't always necessarily mean you'll still get a good mark. The essay has to read and flow well as well, especially for the language exam.

    Other than that, I'm not sure what else to say, it can be quite easy to blag (I did in a couple of mine) but you're taking a risk. Just make sure you know the key themes of your texts and remember to put quotations from the text in.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    its not impossible.. but be prepared to feel like someone has spread your bumcheeks with a pair of forceps and rammed a pineapple up there. Utterly. Violated.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Has a teacher ever helped you cheat?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Write a reply...
    Reply
    Hide
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.