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    It says on salters nuffield A2 book page 174 that marathones are tend to be scheduled in early morning to reduce the chance of heart stroke. Whats the reason for that?
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    (Original post by yagmurainie)
    It says on salters nuffield A2 book page 174 that marathones are tend to be scheduled in early morning to reduce the chance of heart stroke. Whats the reason for that?
    Maybe because it is hotter in the afternoons, I thinks it is usually cooler in the mornings.
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    I'm a bit confused now.
    Dystrophy is a kind of wasting due to disease and the death of muscle cells, rite? so it does not involve the UPP in wasting?
    Then, are those treatments effective for dystrophy patients like disabling Foxo...?
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    (Original post by ethiokid)
    Maybe because it is hotter in the afternoons, I thinks it is usually cooler in the mornings.
    Makes sense thx
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    what is the ubiquitin protease pathway?
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    I'm a bit confused now.
    Dystrophy is a kind of wasting due to disease and the death of muscle cells, rite? so it does not involve the UPP in wasting?
    Then, are those treatments effective for dystrophy patients like disabling Foxo...?
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    (Original post by CHemgeo)
    what is the ubiquitin protease pathway?
    It's a pathway that basically breaks down protein in to constituent components, ie amino acids.

    It works by the following:
    1- Ubiquitin labels the protein that needs that needs to be broken down by binding to it.
    2- Then the Ubiquitin protein complex binds to proteosomes
    3- The polypeptide protein chain starts to unfold and passes into the proteosomes
    4- The Ubiquitin is released
    5- The polypeptide is hydrolysed into peptides and amino acids.

    If this occurs in muscle this would essentially break down the muscle, causing the patient to become weaker and weaker.
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    (Original post by sadbuttrue92)
    I'm a bit confused now.
    Dystrophy is a kind of wasting due to disease and the death of muscle cells, rite? so it does not involve the UPP in wasting?
    Then, are those treatments effective for dystrophy patients like disabling Foxo...?
    Well Foxo is a transcription factor that controls the switching on and off, of the atrogenes. The atrogenes cause atrophy so by suppressing the Foxo transcrition factors we ensure that atrogenes switched on. Thus it will not be transcribed into mRNA.

    So the answer to your question is yes, if the right atrogene is found it will be an effective way of fighting dystrophy.
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    (Original post by BustyLaRouge)
    Check page 181
    and also i rewrote out the diagram of how epo works.

    We did a spider diagram in class of everything particularly important in the article and also key words. I also highlighted stuff in the article I thought was particularly relevant and made a note on topics to look over


    This is a protein kinase cascade
    ahh thank you

    page 181 in which book? I have the orange SNAB book and the revision guide
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    (Original post by LibbyU)
    ahh thank you

    page 181 in which book? I have the orange SNAB book and the revision guide
    EPO is page 191 in orange snab book
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    Any ideas on how to answer:

    "what is the role of animal models in research?"

    i cant write much about it?
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    (Original post by chemdweeb1234)
    Any ideas on how to answer:

    "what is the role of animal models in research?"

    i cant write much about it?
    maybe think about hubel and wiesel's experiments on monkeys and kittens which taught us about the critical window.

    animals allow us to do experiments which would other wise to unethical on humans so they do have a role in the respect.
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    Need an elaboration of pavlov's dog experiment......i am nt geting what is conditioned reflex...a help would be apreciated
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    (Original post by ethiokid)
    It's a pathway that basically breaks down protein in to constituent components, ie amino acids.

    It works by the following:
    1- Ubiquitin labels the protein that needs that needs to be broken down by binding to it.
    2- Then the Ubiquitin protein complex binds to proteosomes
    3- The polypeptide protein chain starts to unfold and passes into the proteosomes
    4- The Ubiquitin is released
    5- The polypeptide is hydrolysed into peptides and amino acids.

    If this occurs in muscle this would essentially break down the muscle, causing the patient to become weaker and weaker.
    what is this lool i never saw this thing..? is it in the syllabus? anywhere in book? plz help
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    (Original post by abuelzouz)
    what is this lool i never saw this thing..? is it in the syllabus? anywhere in book? plz help
    its in the prerelease page 7 paragraph 4 (after active atrophy)
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    (Original post by ethiokid)
    maybe think about hubel and wiesel's experiments on monkeys and kittens which taught us about the critical window.

    animals allow us to do experiments which would other wise to unethical on humans so they do have a role in the respect.
    got that... i was thinking along the lines of other advantages... such as whether the data from these animal experiments can be extrapolated to humans because they share a common evolutionary background? or they have similar nervous systems?
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    (Original post by LibbyU)
    ahh thank you

    page 181 in which book? I have the orange SNAB book and the revision guide
    I have the Edexcel students book haha... Dunno if that's one you have
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    (Original post by abuelzouz)
    what is this lool i never saw this thing..? Is it in the syllabus? Anywhere in book? Plz help
    you havent read anything have you? Its in the freaking article, you better start your revision
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    (Original post by Ayostunner)
    Hi guys im tryig to find the Topic 8 spec notes...does anyone have them?
    Tkoki1993's Note I have it, send me your email addy and i will message it to you
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    (Original post by darkiee)
    Tkoki1993's Note I have it, send me your email addy and i will message it to you
    Plz mail them to me too!
 
 
 
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