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    what is the pavlov's dog experiment- do we need to know this?
    is it to do with habituation??
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    Do we need to know the specific details about how IGF-1 works? alike EPO and its affect on RBC formation. Or just that IGF-1 is a peptide hormone, and prevents muscle dystrophy and increases muscle tissue through transcription and translation.

    Question 2:
    EPO is specifically binds to stem cells, what are IGF-1's target cells?

    Thankyou.
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    (Original post by voices1)
    what is the pavlov's dog experiment- do we need to know this?
    is it to do with habituation??
    no and no
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    (Original post by groovygramp)
    Do we need to know the specific details about how IGF-1 works? alike EPO and its affect on RBC formation. Or just that IGF-1 is a peptide hormone, and prevents muscle dystrophy and increases muscle tissue through transcription and translation.

    Question 2:
    EPO is specifically binds to stem cells, what are IGF-1's target cells?

    Thankyou.
    I wouldn't have thought you would need to know about IGF-1 and how it actually biochemically works as it's not part of the actual book/specification.
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    (Original post by groovygramp)
    Do we need to know the specific details about how IGF-1 works? alike EPO and its affect on RBC formation. Or just that IGF-1 is a peptide hormone, and prevents muscle dystrophy and increases muscle tissue through transcription and translation.

    Question 2:
    EPO is specifically binds to stem cells, what are IGF-1's target cells?

    Thankyou.
    I'm guessing any muscle cell really? but it would have a widespread effect LIKE INSULIN
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    (Original post by voices1)
    what is the pavlov's dog experiment- do we need to know this?
    is it to do with habituation??
    Pavlov's dogs is an experiment which shows "conditioned reflexes"; a type of learned behaviour: could ask you what a conditioned reflex is (unlikely but maybe)
    "conditioned reflexes are the result of animals learning to associate new stimuli with an existing unconditioned reflex" So for pavlov's dog, Pavlov rang a bell I think every time he served food to the dogs over time they began to salivate(unconditioned reflex) when the bell is rung(new stimulus).
    Not that I think you need it, but might help to make a mental note
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    hey guys just wanted to know how much detail we're expected to state when answering the synoptic section? because there seems to be a lot of possible things that could come up...? and also what the most likeliest topic a 6/7 mark qstn could be on in the synoptic bit?
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    (Original post by chemdweeb1234)
    Any ideas on how to answer:

    "what is the role of animal models in research?"

    i cant write much about it?

    http://www.scribd.com/doc/40151716/E...Revision-Notes look at the 77. page. Hope it helps!
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    (Original post by smoddy24)
    hey guys just wanted to know how much detail we're expected to state when answering the synoptic section? because there seems to be a lot of possible things that could come up...? and also what the most likeliest topic a 6/7 mark qstn could be on in the synoptic bit?
    Do you mean in the final part, as that's mainly to do with the pre-release material, so most of the answers will be found in there.
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    (Original post by smoddy24)
    hey guys just wanted to know how much detail we're expected to state when answering the synoptic section? because there seems to be a lot of possible things that could come up...? and also what the most likeliest topic a 6/7 mark qstn could be on in the synoptic bit?
    my teacher reckons it might be differences/similarities between the different experiments on pages 8/9 "gym in a bottle" or discuss validity of all 3 something like that but thats just a stab in the dark
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    (Original post by BustyLaRouge)
    my teacher reckons it might be differences/similarities between the different experiments on pages 8/9 "gym in a bottle" or discuss validity of all 3 something like that but thats just a stab in the dark
    It will link it back to the textbook, so maybe something to do with transcription factors/hormones is a good possibility.
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    where (organ) the lactate produced by anaerobic respiration is oxidised to pyruvate??
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    Can anyone just outline anemia. I feel that "a shortage of red blood cells" doesn't seem enough for question for "what is anemia?"
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    Can anyone outline the spirometer practical for me please..?
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    (Original post by TheBigI)
    It will link it back to the textbook, so maybe something to do with transcription factors/hormones is a good possibility.
    That is part of the text book :P like animal studies, ethics of it, pros/cons
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    (Original post by BustyLaRouge)
    That is part of the text book :P like animal studies, ethics of it, pros/cons
    I don't see how animal studies will link into the pre-release though...
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    (Original post by TheBigI)
    I don't see how animal studies will link into the pre-release though...
    Hahaha, have you read it? It talks loads about animal studies, the use of mice and monkeys.
    key thems :genetic engineering, gene doping, drugs in sport, animal testing and drug testing and muscles.
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    (Original post by yagmurainie)
    where (organ) the lactate produced by anaerobic respiration is oxidised to pyruvate??
    In the SNABs book it just says cells convert lactate back to pyruvate via krebs cycle into co2 and water to produce atp again, hence why oxygen uptake is high (oxygen is final electron acceptor in oxiditive phosphoylation. Specifically the cells are presumably muscular cells, found in slow twitch/fast twitch muscle fibres dependant on type of exercise.

    Remember lactate is also converted in glycogen and glucose by the liver also.
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    (Original post by BustyLaRouge)
    Hahaha, have you read it? It talks loads about animal studies, the use of mice and monkeys.
    key thems :genetic engineering, gene doping, drugs in sport, animal testing and drug testing and muscles.
    So it does! I need to read it again I think!

    I can see the question being 'how does (one of the drugs) affect cells' as this can cover a whole load of the topic.
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    (Original post by BustyLaRouge)
    my teacher reckons it might be differences/similarities between the different experiments on pages 8/9 "gym in a bottle" or discuss validity of all 3 something like that but thats just a stab in the dark
    what would you write for that question? I sounds hard.....
 
 
 
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