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    (Original post by tophothari)
    Benefits:
    - higher yield, plants more nutrious
    - enzymes produced in large quantity, and production method is cheaper, so high profit
    - human protein used (as template) in GMO rather than conventional animal protein, therefore its safer and more effective in treatments
    - make them weed resistance, so cost reduces, crop is less expensive, so used in LEDCs

    Risks:
    - transmission of weed-resistance gene during interbreed, chance of producing superweed or superbug increases
    - modifying genetic material of organisms purely for human benefite is immoral


    thats all i can think of sorry.
    wtf??? what topic is this?!
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    (Original post by TheDustyKid)
    I have a question! So, am i right in saying that in order for a nerve impulse to be transmitted, there needs to be neurotransmitters released from the presynaptic membrane into the synaptic cleft (and then reabsorbed into the presynaptic cleft or broken down after transmission)?

    Well, in light stimulation, the CGP revision guide says that "Na+ ions diffuse into the rod cell -> inside slightly negative (depolarisation) -> triggers release of neurotransmitters -> neurotransmitters inhibit the bipolar neurone (ie it can't fire an action potential)." Surely the release of a neurotransmitter would mean an action potential could be fired?

    Could someone explain this to me please : )

    Also, out of Na+ and K+, is Na+ the more negative one?
    It doesn't matter which one is the more negative one. In resting potential, the protein inside cell is far more negative compared to the minimal negativeness between the Na and Ka cations, thats why in resting potential its -70mv
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    (Original post by bertstare)
    wtf??? what topic is this?!
    Topic 8, genetically modificed organisms (GMO)
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    How EPO stimulate the formation of new red blood cells?
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    (Original post by yagmurainie)
    How EPO stimulate the formation of new red blood cells?
    -EPO is one of the transcription factor
    - EPO joins with other transcription factor + RNA polymerase to form transcription factor complex
    - This complex allows the gene for humoglobin to be expressed in bone marrow
    - the more the EPO in a cell, increases the rate of transcription
    - the faster the gene of humoglobin is expressed, the more humoglobin is produced
    -therefore the more epo, more red blood cells are produced.


    How does short day plants differ from long day plants, describe in terms of photoreptor differential relating to how its affected by the length of darkness per day. [7]
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    (Original post by yagmurainie)
    How EPO stimulate the formation of new red blood cells?
    EPO is a hormone, it will bind to specific receptors on target cells and stimulate the realease of adenyl cyclas which will convert ATP into second messenger. this will then activate transcription fctors and switch the gene on for red blood cell production
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    hey....

    i was just wondering are there any January papers for unit 5...?
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    (Original post by Assrarri)
    hey....

    i was just wondering are there any January papers for unit 5...?
    January 2011 questions and markscheme? I got them but im not sure if im allowed to post it on here (nor do i know how to post it on here xD )
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    (Original post by Assrarri)
    hey....

    i was just wondering are there any January papers for unit 5...?

    hi yes there is ive attached them


    6BI05 MS Jan 2011.PDF

    6BI05 Jan 2011.PDF

    Jan 11 6BI05 Article.PDF
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    How does gene expression brought about?
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    ANY?WHat is the difference between ERG1 and Atrogin 1?

    atrogin1 is involved with muscle wasting.

    and in page 8 of the article they are oning abt erg1a and ergb ,can anyone explain it to ?does erg1 has same function as atrogin1/?

    my other question!
    on page 7 of the artcile it says ''when Glass knocked out each of the two atrogenesin rats'' what do they mean?
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    ANY?WHat is the difference between ERG1 and Atrogin 1?

    atrogin1 is involved with muscle wasting.

    and in page 8 of the article they are oning abt erg1a and ergb ,can anyone explain it to ?does erg1 has same function as atrogin1/?

    my other question!
    on page 7 of the artcile it says ''when Glass knocked out each of the two atrogenesin rats'' what do they mean?
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    transcriotion factros
    (Original post by yagmurainie)
    How does gene expression brought about?
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    (Original post by amnah_70)
    hi yes there is ive attached them


    6BI05 MS Jan 2011.PDF

    6BI05 Jan 2011.PDF

    Jan 11 6BI05 Article.PDF

    Thank you
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    umm do we need to about different growth factors like Gibberellins , cytokinins, ethene etc ? (yeah i read those from the book) :P
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    can any one explain to me question 5c from jan.2011 paper?
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    can any one explain to me question 5c from jan.2011 paper?
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    (Original post by Assrarri)
    Thank you
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    Ahh this paper is killing me! I have had too many exams consecutively and had maths today, ahhh, I'm so scared for this!
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    hi i dont understand why when light hits a rod cell, no neurotransmitter being released would lead to depolarization of the bipolar cell ? I thought it was the neurotransmitter which caused the opening of the Na+ channels on the post synaptic membrane ?

    Also what does the bipolar cell depolarizing actually do because can't rod cells provide vision in dim light conditions (even when the bipolar cell isnt depolarized?)
 
 
 
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