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    http://www.mediafire.com/file/rtj5z0mxzmm/The Nervous System.doc

    I hope they are okay... may have missed some stuff..

    Well when I say concise they're 6 pages.. but each section is pretty concise and gives only what you'll need to know.. and it's well spaced..
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    What are you guys learning for:

    Discuss how the outcomes of the Human Genome Project are being used in the development of new drugs and the social, moral and ethical issues this raises.
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    (Original post by sidrah)
    Just finished on topic 8..
    Topic 8 is the first one, and I've also got topic 7 with the correction.
    My neurone drawings are awful, so the brain and eye were off google lol..
    HEy THANKS you have done good job,,,,,:cool:
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    (Original post by HyperNova)
    Beginning of exercise --> more blood returns to heart (due to contractions of muscles in legs/arms) --> more blood flows into atria --> receptors stretched more --> nerve impulses to cardiovascular centre increases --> nerve impulses back through sympathetic nerves --> SAN stimulated --> heart rate increases..

    There we go.
    I thought stretch receptors were in the lungs as well... O_o
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    The alveoli to be exact...
    what ever happened to the brain...why hasnt anyone strted tlkin about that as yet??
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    (Original post by move on)
    The green student book says,
    Deoxyhaemoglobin absorbs the radiowave signal and later re-emits it, while oxyhaemoglobin does not. When an area of the brain is active, the blood flow to that area increases and more oxyhaemoglobin is delivered to supply the active cells with the oxygen they need from aerobic respiration. Less of the signal is absorbed as a result.

    But, isn't amount of deoxyhaemoglobin increases when oxyhaemoglobin is more...and so shouldn't more of the signal be absorbed when the brain is active?


    i don thk i can answer your question though. can someone help pls? bt i don understand y would amount of deoxyhaemoglobin increase when oxyhaemoglobin increase?
    When the brain is active, it needs more oxygen and so more oxyhaemoglobin is supplied! Since its more active, more respiration and so more CO2 is produced, resulting in more deoxyhaemoglobin production!
    I think thats how it works..........someone please help!!
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    Can someone please tell me if we should know how drugs work? I dont see it in the spec but it is included in my text book.
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    (Original post by Blackelf)
    Can someone please tell me if we should know how drugs work? I dont see it in the spec but it is included in my text book.
    I think, just to be on the safe side... It's not too hard to learn in all fairness.

    I've only leant Steroid Hormones, Testosterone (increases amount of muscle) and Creatine (increase the amounts of creatine phosphate in muscles).. and also drugs that increase the amounts of red blood cells etc.

    It's a whole chapter in the Snab book, so worth just reading on.
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    (Original post by Pedus)
    I think, just to be on the safe side... It's not too hard to learn in all fairness.

    I've only leant Steroid Hormones, Testosterone (increases amount of muscle) and Creatine (increase the amounts of creatine phosphate in muscles).. and also drugs that increase the amounts of red blood cells etc.

    It's a whole chapter in the Snab book, so worth just reading on.
    thanks , your right *sigh*
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    *cry*

    *stop ze cry*

    Ok, does anybody actually know this friggin' article inside out?
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    (Original post by Doughboy)
    I thought stretch receptors were in the lungs as well... O_o
    They are! Stretch receptors are in the lungs, heart and blood vessels (along with many other places, I'm sure). They work in a similar way to chemoreceptors, sending impulses to the ventilation centre in the medulla if from the lungs, and to the cardiovascular control centre in the medulla if from the heart/blood vessels.

    -----

    Guys,

    does anyone know if the sympathetic/accelorator nerve and parasympathetic/vagus nerve are involved in BOTH controlling ventilation and controlling heart rate?

    EDIT... meant heart rate, not breathing rate...
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    Then what do baroreceptors do? :confused:
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    (Original post by skotch)
    does anyone know if the sympathetic/accelorator nerve and parasympathetic/vagus nerve are involved in BOTH controlling ventilation and controlling breathing rate?
    i thought breathing rate and ventilation rate were the same... for breathing I am pretty sure there is no parasympathetic nerve just a sympathetic nerve which sends impulses when it wants to increase breathing rate and doesn't send them when it wants to slow breathing rate

    (Original post by dynamikal)
    Then what do baroreceptors do? :confused:
    a baroreceptor is just another name for a stretch receptor
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    (Original post by skotch)
    They are! Stretch receptors are in the lungs, heart and blood vessels (along with many other places, I'm sure). They work in a similar way to chemoreceptors, sending impulses to the ventilation centre in the medulla if from the lungs, and to the cardiovascular control centre in the medulla if from the heart/blood vessels.

    -----

    Guys,

    does anyone know if the sympathetic/accelorator nerve and parasympathetic/vagus nerve are involved in BOTH controlling ventilation and controlling breathing rate?
    The parasympathetic and sympathetic are only involved on heart rat but the vagus nerve is what the parasympathetic nerve controlling the heart is called
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    (Original post by dynamikal)
    *cry*

    *stop ze cry*

    Ok, does anybody actually know this friggin' article inside out?
    Nope, but seriously don't stress out.. If anything, they'll ask us more stuff to do with synoptic elements so seriously chillax.
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    (Original post by 03eleitch)
    i thought breathing rate and ventilation rate were the same... for breathing I am pretty sure there is no parasympathetic nerve just a sympathetic nerve which sends impulses when it wants to increase breathing rate and doesn't send them when it wants to slow breathing rate
    Sorry, I meant ventilation rate and heart rate! My bad!
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    Can someone explain to me what the Pons in the brain actually does as in functions? It's not explained in the book or the revision guide
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    (Original post by dynamikal)
    Then what do baroreceptors do? :confused:
    receptors that are sensitive to PRESSURE.
    there are a lot of baroreceptors in the blood vessels to detect changes in blood flow

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baroreceptor

    wikipedia is a gold mine for bio revision
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    (Original post by Pedus)
    Can someone explain to me what the Pons in the brain actually does as in functions? It's not explained in the book or the revision guide
    Pons


    Function:

    >Arousal
    >Assists in Controlling Autonomic Functions
    >Relays Sensory Information Between the Cerebrum and Cerebellum
    >Sleep

    Location:

    >The pons is the portion of the brainstem that is superior (above) to the medulla oblongata.
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    (Original post by Doughboy)
    I thought stretch receptors were in the lungs as well... O_o
    yes they're called pulmonary stretch receptors.
    In heart walls too.
 
 
 

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