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    (Original post by Abu3005)
    I have a paper copy. Is there a particular question, I can type up the answer for?
    Yes please!
    Q 4b] I get the drift, but just wanted an ideal ans for it

    Thank yuuu
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    What aer pons? I dotn think Ive come across them in the books!! =/
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    (Original post by kappleberry)
    What aer pons? I dotn think Ive come across them in the books!! =/
    Same here, hope its not some other useless tat that we gotta learn
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    (Original post by Pedus)
    Right, I kinda get that, but in the book it says that "Red light triggers germination, far-red light inhibits germination" which is totally oposite to what you said
    So sad to see the amount of people that trust that book :o:

    EDIT: Regardless of whether they're right or not on this topic :P
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    (Original post by Doughboy)
    So sad to see the amount of people that trust that book :o:

    EDIT: Regardless of whether they're right or not on this topic :P
    :shh: doe.
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    (Original post by kappleberry)
    Yes please!
    Q 4b] I get the drift, but just wanted an ideal ans for it

    Thank yuuu
    Describe
    1)Before exercise, breathing rate constant
    2)During exercise breathing rate increases
    3)After exercise breathing rate decreases to starting rate.

    Explain
    4) Reference to change in pH
    5)Detected by chemoreceptors
    6)in carotid/aorta/medulla
    7)Ref. to ventilation centre
    8)Idea of nerve connection to intercostal muscles
    9)Ref. to of stretch receptors
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    Which book are you making reference too doughboy?

    The green/blue one by ann fullick? Or the CGP? Or....:confused:
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    (Original post by dynamikal)
    Which book are you making reference too doughboy?

    The green/blue one by ann fullick? Or the CGP? Or....:confused:
    pretty sure hes talking bout the actual SNAB text book
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    [QUOTE=_joshb_]How are they the substrates though? and in what way do the intermediate compounds provide energy for the formation of ATP?

    Because the breakdown of glucose releases a lot of energy (glucose is at a higher energy level then the breakdown products), if this was not used immediately it would be wasted, therefore as the energy is produced( when the glucose breaks down into the intermediate compound this is when the energy is released) it is stored as molecules of ATP.

    A substrate is a substance on which an enzyme acts. In all stages of respiration the reactions are controlled by enzymes, therefore effectively the intermediate compund would also be a substrate.
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    Ann Fullick and any 'main' Edexcel book.

    I use revision guides and general Biology text books. Sometimes I refer to my main Edexcel textbook, just in case.
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    (Original post by Abu3005)
    Describe
    1)Before exercise, breathing rate constant
    2)During exercise breathing rate increases
    3)After exercise breathing rate decreases to starting rate.

    Explain
    4) Reference to change in pH
    5)Detected by chemoreceptors
    6)in carotid/aorta/medulla
    7)Ref. to ventilation centre
    8)Idea of nerve connection to intercostal muscles
    9)Ref. to of stretch receptors
    Thank you for that! =]
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    (Original post by Doughboy)
    I am definitely not ready for this!!!

    Pain and gender section of the article is total crap. I don't understand it V_V
    That's the ONLY section I understand!
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    Would anyone have happened to have made a list of which topics from the book we should look into for each section of the article? o.O

    I think that may help me understand this better!

    Thank yoou
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    (Original post by liv jones)
    Hi is there any chance that you could upload the topic tests onto here? cos i can't get onto the snab website anymore?! sorry i dont have the mark schemes.
    thanks
    Found them all and their mark schemes! Enjoy.
    Attached Files
  1. File Type: doc Topic_7_exam-style_test.doc (161.5 KB, 203 views)
  2. File Type: doc Topic_8_exam-style_test[1].doc (137.5 KB, 171 views)
  3. File Type: doc Topic_7_markscheme.doc (49.0 KB, 240 views)
  4. File Type: doc Topic_8_markscheme[1].doc (40.0 KB, 159 views)
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    (Original post by sammyk1991)
    The one thing I don't understand with the article is where it talks about how adaptation to stress might occur - meaning habituation

    Repeated stress causes more neuradrenaline to be produced, meaning more noradrenaline binds to b-adrenoreceptors, which means more cyclic AMP is produced in both the presynaptic neuron and the postsynaptic neurone.

    But how does that lead to Noradrenaline becoming less able to stimulate the cell?

    It's also difficult cause there aare apparently b-adrenoreceptors on the presynaptic membrane and the postsynaptic membrane, so I don't even understand which neurone it's talking about.

    It's in the second last paragraph on page 8.
    Not seen a reply to this, sorry if someone else has replied. Assuming it works in the same way as normal habituation, it's the calcium channels on the pre-synaptic side which become less responsive. Therefore a greater frequecny of action potentials is required to meet the threshold and open the calcium channels fully. Less calcium ions = less synaptic vesicles binding to the pre-synaptic membrane = less noradrenaline in synaptic cleft.

    Could do with a little help on this one:
    Describe the role animal models have played in developing explanations of human brain development and function, including Hubel and Wiesel’s experiments with monkeys and kittens.

    Which studies are Hubel & Wiesel's?
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    (Original post by Nereis)
    Could do with a little help on this one:
    Describe the role animal models have played in developing explanations of human brain development and function, including Hubel and Wiesel’s experiments with monkeys and kittens.

    Which studies are Hubel & Wiesel's?
    This is the monocular deprivation one. Where they raised a monkey from birth to six months depriving them for any light stilmulus in one eye. And after the six months of light deprivation it was observed that the monkey was blind in the light deprived eye. Deprivation in adults had no effect becase their critical period had already ended.

    Page 236 of the snab book.
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    Fantastic, thankyou.
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    (Original post by AnythingButChardonnay)
    Found them all and their mark schemes! Enjoy.
    Thank you so much!
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    Gah sorry! Didn't even read your Q properly. The kittens experiment is only referred to in a Q in th snab book. But I assume the reason is the same. Visual stimulation is required for visual development and all that.
    The growth of axons and snyapse formation requires visual stimualtion...
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    What does it mean by "off-the shelf" strain of flies?

    Oh, and the question about Pan's experiment and what it tells us about the visual cortex development of the mice - do we talk about how axons are able to pass nerve impulses to cells in visual cortex, so synapes used are strenthed?
    Or do we talk about how they are similar to humans visual cortex?
 
 
 
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