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    (Original post by Shining*)
    Promote? Or prevent?
    This is talking about the effect of drugs on synapses right?

    Well if the neurotransmitter is responsible for transmitting pain impulses then certainly you'd want to promote UPTAKE of it right? Uptake means you're removing it from the cleft.
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    (Original post by Doughboy)
    Well if the neurotransmitter is responsible for transmitting pain impulses then certainly you'd want to promote UPTAKE of it right? Uptake means you're removing it from the cleft.
    Oh, yes, thats true! :/ Thanks
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    (Original post by Doughboy)
    Oxyhaemo. doesn't absorb radio signals and isn't really affected by magnetic fields like Deoxyhaemo. is.

    Active parts of the brain have Oxyhaemo. [and so active parts absorb less radio signals/affected less by magnetic field] and show up as lighter images on the screen.
    Well, more oxyhaemoglobin means more respiration and so more deoxyhaemoglobin production........so shouldn't more radio signals be absorbed??....i might be wrong......please correct me!:eek3:
    (Deoxyhaemoglobin absorbs radio signals)
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    (Original post by John Deere)
    Brill thread, just having a break from revising nerves!!
    alright sherman!!
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    June 05 paper, Q 4c says :
    Atroponine is used to dilate the pupil to allow the eye to be examines more easily. Atropine inhibits the activity of acetylcholine. Suggest how atropine causes this inhibition?.

    The ans is along the lines of it having a similar shape to acetylcholine and so preventing the binding of it. I dont get that. Surely if it has a similar shape, the atropine itself will cause depolarisation and hence an Action potential? How is it working as an inhibitor if its binding to the receptopr on the post synaptic membrane?



    help please?
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    [QUOTE=evilzadi]these are some model Q&A for the articles that my teacher gave us. i've copied and pasted it. didn't know how else to put it here, but hope it helps anyway

    Wow! You've got some very helpful teachers!

    Thank you so much!
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    (Original post by kappleberry)
    June 05 paper, Q 4c says :
    Atroponine is used to dilate the pupil to allow the eye to be examines more easily. Atropine inhibits the activity of acetylcholine. Suggest how atropine causes this inhibition?.

    The ans is along the lines of it having a similar shape to acetylcholine and so preventing the binding of it. I dont get that. Surely if it has a similar shape, the atropine itself will cause depolarisation and hence an Action potential? How is it working as an inhibitor if its binding to the receptopr on the post synaptic membrane?



    help please?
    any type of inhibitor will have a complimentary shape to the substrate/neurotransmitor but not have an exact fit to cause a reaction..in this case opining of sodium ion channels...so it just sits there blocking the receptor sites

    you mind uploading that markscheme?
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    (Original post by koop)
    any type of inhibitor will have a complimentary shape to the substrate/neurotransmitor but not have an exact fit to cause a reaction..in this case opining of sodium ion channels...so it just sits there blocking the receptor sites

    you mind uploading that markscheme?
    O right. They should really make that clear! Thank yuu.
    And yep, Ill have to scan it on though. Give me er...a few minutes-this could take some time ... don't use this thing much =/
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    (Original post by Doughboy)
    No. The eye does not contain neurones that are in emotional connections. I kind of see where you are coming from, but it's simply not easily possible. Besides, it's not like they can magically wire neurones in the eye to emotional connections or other connections for that matter.
    NO, you are wrong !
    Eye without a doubt respond to emotional changes, why to you think we tear up when in pain and sad ?

    Page 219 (Edexcel Green A2 Biology Book), 2nd paragraph on the left.
    "The pupils respond to emotional cues as well as light ..."
    So my notion was correct after all.:p:
    :rolleyes:
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    I WANT TO SWICH MY SEX HORMONES AROUND WITH MIKE TYSON so i can have a male pain threshold sensitivity at an abnormal hight for a young woman:yep:
    but i would genetically modify the hormones to get rid of all the male secondary characteristics and stuff-create a drug...-
    so im just left with this thing that will not make me weak but strong, without all the adverse effects ie-deep voice....:yep:

    this would be a good drug tbh:cool:
    if this was in the shops i would BUY IT:cool: lol
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    It is true that eyes do respond to emotional changes.

    Fight or Flight

    Pupils widen in order to let in more light making it easier to see predator/prey.

    When you are attracted to someone your pupils widen.. etc



    Anyway, I don't believe the eye has anything to do with the artical. The artical talks about light being used to trigger photosensitive receptors which in turn trigger nerves. They have genetically engineered worms to respond to blue and yellow light. What they want to do is make it possible for nerves in human brains to also be activated by light. The light and photoreceptors are only a medium in which to stimulate specific nerves such as ones which release a neutransmitter to change emotions... etc..
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    (Original post by kappleberry)
    O right. They should really make that clear! Thank yuu.
    And yep, Ill have to scan it on though. Give me er...a few minutes-this could take some time ... don't use this thing much =/
    cheers
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    it is Pfr or Pr that inhibits flowering in plants?

    i hate SNAB textbooks, they overcomplicate everything
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    (Original post by abcdemilyxx)
    it is Pfr or Pr that inhibits flowering in plants?

    i hate SNAB textbooks, they overcomplicate everything

    Pfr is the only one which affect flowering...

    Pfr either inhibits or stimulates depending on the plant - long day plants and short day plants.

    If it's a long day plant: Pfr stimulates flowering.
    Short day plant: Pfr inhibits flowering. (The lack of Pfr stimulates flowering not Pr)

    Pr does nothing. It's just the stable form of the pigment. Pfr is the biologicaly active form.
    Active means that it can inhibit or stimulate.
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    (Original post by HyperNova)
    Pfr is the only one which affect flowering...

    Pfr either inhibits or stimulates depending on the plant - long day plants and short day plants.

    If it's a long day plant: Pfr stimulates flowering.
    Short day plant: Pfr inhibits flowering. (The lack of Pfr stimulates flowering not Pr)

    Pr does nothing. It's just the stable form of the pigment. Pfr is the biologicaly active form.
    Active means that it can inhibit or stimulate.


    thank you it had me so confused.
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    (Original post by abcdemilyxx)
    it is Pfr or Pr that inhibits flowering in plants?

    i hate SNAB textbooks, they overcomplicate everything
    depending on the type of flower
    in long day plants: pr inhibits flowering (as they need less than 12 hours of uninterrupted darkness, thus majority of daylight)
    in short day plants: pfr inhibits flowering (as they need more than 12 hours of uninterrupted darkness)
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    (Original post by koop)
    depending on the type of flower
    in long day plants: pr inhibits flowering (as they need less than 12 hours of uninterrupted darkness, thus majority of daylight)
    in short day plants: pfr inhibits flowering (as they need more than 12 hours of uninterrupted darkness)

    Technically that's not true of the first point. Pr doesn't inhibit flowering. The lack of Pfr does..
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    (Original post by mariame)
    I WANT TO SWICH MY SEX HORMONES AROUND WITH MIKE TYSON so i can have a male pain threshold sensitivity at an abnormal hight for a young woman:yep:
    but i would genetically modify the hormones to get rid of all the male secondary characteristics and stuff-create a drug...-
    so im just left with this thing that will not make me weak but strong, without all the adverse effects ie-deep voice....:yep:

    this would be a good drug tbh:cool:
    if this was in the shops i would BUY IT:cool: lol
    lool yeah this is the true use of biology :cool: the possibilities are endless...
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    Do we need to know about long day and short day plants? And which stimulates or inhibits?

    I thought we just needed to know in general about the inactive form Pr converted to active form Pfr in red (natural) light..

    And in far red light - converts back..?
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    (Original post by Shining*)
    Do we need to know about long day and short day plants? And which stimulates or inhibits?

    I thought we just needed to know in general about the inactive form Pr converted to active form Pfr in red (natural) light..

    And in far red light - converts back..?

    it's in the textbook but not in the revision guide, so i guess it just depends on what you go by.
 
 
 
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