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    (Original post by fran.ha)
    Not necessarily.

    People who aren't at uni have so many misconceptions about it. They think they're just going to make loads of instant friends and have so much fun etc etc. A lot of it isn't true.


    University is really just like your life has been up until now just with less money, more work and without your mum telling you to get up in the morning.

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    (Original post by infernalcradle)
    Don't get me wrong, it is fun. But its not what its built up to be really. Especially if you don't drink.
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    (Original post by wanderlust.xx)

    It seems to me that most people find their best friends either from pot luck at school/uni, and then have a far better chance of finding friends for life once they're holding down a job.
    Is that actually true? I've always thought that once you start a career it would be harder to find true friends as the opportunities for meeting people would be far more limited (aside from co-workers)
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    If you really have a problem with people at home, then hopefully you should make some better friends at uni as there are more people so you are not forced to be friends with the people you went to school with. However, don't cut ties completely. What about when you come home for Christmas/Easter/Summer? You'll come home and have no friends...
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    (Original post by KingPrawn0356)
    Is that actually true? I've always thought that once you start a career it would be harder to find true friends as the opportunities for meeting people would be far more limited (aside from co-workers)
    From my experience you tend to bond far more with people you work or live with rather than those you learn with. Hence people consistently claim that best friends are more likely to appear from halls rather than lectures.

    Depending on what sort of job you do, there's plenty of time to chat and get to know one another, whereas lectures or probably aren't, since silence is golden (learning, staying quiet so others can concentrate). When you're working, you're often encouraged to support each other etc by your bosses anyway.

    The thing is, making good friends does not require you to meet a lot of people; it requires you to bond with people you're already in contact with. If I had more bonding time with the people I just said hello to on a daily basis then I'm sure that I'd get a hell of a lot of mates straight off the bat.
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    you're going to warwick, you can be my friend =P
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    (Original post by KingPrawn0356)
    Is that actually true? I've always thought that once you start a career it would be harder to find true friends as the opportunities for meeting people would be far more limited (aside from co-workers)

    It all depends.

    There's no magic formula for making good friends, some people feel they see enough of their colleagues at work all day and don't want to socialise outside. Some jobs are very busy or don't allow for a lot of conversation so you never get to know people.

    I have good close friends from school, uni and work, but just a few from each out of the thousands of people I've come into contact with.
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    (Original post by MrsCrackFox)
    Yes, but you're just one person.Your experience can't be applied to everyone.
    You have read the rest of this thread, right?

    To be honest, I'm bored of this whole university business. After you've been there for a while (6 years in my case - resat a year after UCAS transfer and am now doing an MSc), you get this feeling of paralysis and being chained down with an itch to leave it all behind and start your life properly. I know this forum is The Student Room but I'm quite frankly alarmed at how overexcited younger people and new applicants get about university as a whole.

    Calm down. It's good but not that good, and if you genuinely think it's the best time of your life then you're probably a very boring person with a bleak and monotonous future.

    Spoiler:
    Show
    "But why don't you drop out of your MSc if you're bored of uni?", I hear you squawk. The answer to that question is that it's a means to an end, takes me into a career track that I find appealing and it's a necessary evil to get what I want out of life. What's 16 months extra in education when you've got 40+ years of full time work ahead of you?
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    (Original post by ch0llima)
    Definitely the latter - you see so many different people at university that it's impossible to keep track of all of them once you finish, as you will all be doing different things in different places. I've made a few friends for life but not the hundreds and hundreds, along with a lifelong spouse, that people would have you believe you'll end up with.

    Your school friends, and people you grew up with, are your true friends for life as you have spent more time with them and had their (mostly) undivided attention. 3-4 years of posing and social jousting does not a lifelong friendship make.
    I disagree, I am not in regular contact with anyone from my secondary school any more, very rarely I might get a 'Like' from one or two of them if I post a status update, but that's as far as the friendship goes. I haven't seen any of them in years.

    It's quickly becoming that way with my sixth form friends as well, I got some happy birthday messages from some of them but the last time I properly talked to someone from there was January. I can imagine in a few years time the same would happen and I would be barely speaking to anyone from my sixth form.

    I don't believe that your true friends are set in stone at school, nor uni, they just come when you both connect very well, whether that be when you're 10, 20 or 30 years old.
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    (Original post by ch0llima)

    Calm down. It's good but not that good, and if you genuinely think it's the best time of your life then you're probably a very boring person with a bleak and monotonous future.
    Being unhappy doesn't make it ok for you to lash out at everybody else!

    University is an incredibly positive experience for lots of people. For most who go, its one of the best periods of time in their lives. That makes absolute sense if you think about it, a first taste of independence but no major responsibilities, the first chance to focus entirely on the subject you love and more cheap alcohol than you could shake a stick at.

    You're not having fun anymore? That's a shame, but why are you trying to drag everyone else down with you?
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    (Original post by hannah_dru)
    I did pretty much because all the people I knew at school turned out not to be real friends anyway. Not everyone I've met over the last 4 years at uni can be described as friends for life but I definitely have made some whilst I've been there.
    I was in the same boat in that most of my friends from school turned out to not be real friends. I didnt go to uni (i went to college after 6th form), but at least at uni you meet lots of new people and you live with some of them too. So at least some of them should end up being friends for life.
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    (Original post by ch0llima)
    You have read the rest of this thread, right?

    To be honest, I'm bored of this whole university business. After you've been there for a while (6 years in my case - resat a year after UCAS transfer and am now doing an MSc), you get this feeling of paralysis and being chained down with an itch to leave it all behind and start your life properly. I know this forum is The Student Room but I'm quite frankly alarmed at how overexcited younger people and new applicants get about university as a whole.

    Calm down. It's good but not that good, and if you genuinely think it's the best time of your life then you're probably a very boring person with a bleak and monotonous future.

    Spoiler:
    Show
    "But why don't you drop out of your MSc if you're bored of uni?", I hear you squawk. The answer to that question is that it's a means to an end, takes me into a career track that I find appealing and it's a necessary evil to get what I want out of life. What's 16 months extra in education when you've got 40+ years of full time work ahead of you?
    You think too harshly of people.
    I can see why you wouldn't like university that much.

    Thanks for the neg rep by the way, it meant a lot to me.
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    Well I didn't go to the same school my whole time, so my experience is a little different to most. But I've found I've properly kept one friend from sixth form, and half kept another from secondary. Then there are a few friends I made when I was at school who weren't at the same one I was. That's it. It remains to be seen how many of my uni friends turn into friends for life, but I hope a good few of them will. And honestly, I'd rather have a smaller number of true friends and lots of acquaintances than kid myself into thinking I've got lots and lots and lots of truly meaningful friends...it's just not reality. Also, friends transition, and it's always those you're spending more time with at that moment who are more important.
 
 
 
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