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    (Original post by Dekota-XS)
    Aren't the nurses more in demand than Doctors?
    Not really, nursing jobs are being cut.
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    (Original post by Dekota-XS)
    Aren't the nurses more in demand than Doctors?
    I think unemployment in nurses is higher than in doctors. Demand is less it seems.
    up to 80% unemployment in newly qualified nurses in 2008 meant they cut the number of nursing intakes in Scotland in 2010.:
    http://www.nursingtimes.net/whats-ne...959119.article
    http://www.nursingtimes.net/nursing-...023045.article
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    There is a growing demand for healthcare, yes. However, the government wants to do it as cheaply as possible. This is why it will be farmed out to any willing provider, the government, run by non-medics, think they understand medicine and can run things better than doctors. So, why institute their cunning plans, quite often ending up having circles run around them in the process - GPs saying sod off to out of hours services is a prime example (for around a £6K paycut GPs handed over OOH cover responsibility to PCTs) Oh look, in the new health 'reforms' the government want GPs to be responsible for OOH cover! Wasting billions of pounds to come back to where we started. Healthcare quality is good in this country, not because of the governemnt, but because of GMC self regulation. If the government had its own jolly way, everything would be done as cheaply as possible with standards only being looked at as part of knee jerk responses to daily mail articles.

    The way forward in healthcare is spcialist nurses for everything from incontinance to hand holding. There is no need for medical practicioners because everything is nicely laid out in the Trust Patient Journey Flow Chart. Oh and if it goes wrong, theres always a DMR somewhere to take the flake.
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    You assume that numbers of doctor jobs will directly increase/decrease with demand. Things are not always as ideal.
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    thanks guys
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    (Original post by muddywaters51)
    Is there a demand in the UK for doctors and is that demand decreasing and where does the trend look like it is going? Do the number of medicine graduates outnumber the number of posts available? Is there a site with this kind of information on it?

    Also once you are fully qualified in the UK and you have specialized can you work anywhere in the EU or do you need new qualifications?


    edit: The main question is not whether the there is a demand for doctors. As far as i'm aware there is a demand for doctors and that will increase. However does the number of people graduating or becoming qualified exceed the demand.

    Is the number of people graduating larger than the number of posts available. Thanks for those who have answered. Do you guys feel like you are entering a field where you will likely never beout of a job.

    Also are there any stats our for the demand within each speciality, e.g the demand for neurosurgeons, gp's, radiologists etc
    It costs at least 250k to train a doctor, I doubt the gov't is going to pay for more Drs than we need.
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    (Original post by No Future)
    It costs at least 250k to train a doctor, I doubt the gov't is going to pay for more Drs than we need.
    It looks like they might be.

    It's just a lack of joined up thinking. Remember that the number of people you admit to medicine in any given year is based on central planning from several years ago, these people will go into a job market that was sized for them ten or eleven years previously - for people graduating this year, they would have been admitted based on the plans for an NHS in the early years of a labour government, before foundation schools and the foundation program, before the deaneries were rearranged and before the recession.

    And as we remove deaneries and PMETB that might get even worse.
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    (Original post by No Future)
    It costs at least 250k to train a doctor, I doubt the gov't is going to pay for more Drs than we need.
    Thing is though that its probably in the individual hospitals and Governments interests to have too many doctors. If there are significantly more doctors than training jobs then there are lots more cheaper service providers aka the Staff grade, clinical fellow etc.

    I dont think the Government or individual hospitals give two hoots about the career progression of doctors. It doesnt make a difference to them if a patient is seen by an ST5 trainee or a staff grade. Only difference to them is that potentially a ST5 trainee just becomes more expensive to employ.
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    (Original post by Dekota-XS)
    Aren't the nurses more in demand than Doctors?
    Yep. Nursing is in VERY high demand these days. But places at nursing school are very competetive, so there looks to be no decrease in the near future
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    (Original post by firestar101)
    Who the hell gave me negative rep for this. Obviously someone can not take a joke.
    -rep for complaining about -rep
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    (Original post by No Future)
    It costs at least 250k to train a doctor, I doubt the gov't is going to pay for more Drs than we need.
    Oversupply of medical school graduates is no bad thing when you're their monopoly employer - you can afford to pay them less and they'll make less of a fuss about their terms and conditions. There's the difficulty of planning stuff ahead as Renal says.

    (Original post by navarre)
    Yep. Nursing is in VERY high demand these days. But places at nursing school are very competetive, so there looks to be no decrease in the near future
    Not sure about this - there have been recruitment freezes or cuts in many areas, particularly ward nursing on medical wards. Or replacement with HCAs\cadets: cf Militant Medical Nurse's blog.
 
 
 
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