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    Or in an area with limited atmosphere?

    Just a side thought from a post I made before about colonies on the Moon and Mars; for a power source, would nuclear reactors work in those types of atmosphere? Or even no atmosphere?

    It is just heat and water, so surely within sealed buildings it'd work...?

    But yeah, random question, just unsure.
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    I know practically nothing about this. However, once we can get an efficient fusion reactor working we might draw some confidence from the fact that the sun works...
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    (Original post by DH-Biker)
    Or in an area with limited atmosphere?

    Just a side thought from a post I made before about colonies on the Moon and Mars; for a power source, would nuclear reactors work in those types of atmosphere? Or even no atmosphere?

    It is just heat and water, so surely within sealed buildings it'd work...?

    But yeah, random question, just unsure.
    They work in nuclear submarines, and that is a closed atmosphere, so yes. Also, the sun is essentially a fusion reactor, so that is kind of the case in point, even though our reactors are only developed enough to be fission reactors.
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    Not for the reactions themselves but the actual plant wouldn't work in space. Not 100% but I'm reasonably sure this is the case.
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    Maybe but would be hard to cool it and stuff
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    You'd need an atmosphere and gravity for 'boiling' water to rise (Also water 'boiling' would be rather different).
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    Yes - youd have to pump the coolant round; convection wouldnt work.
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    There many different types of nuclear reactor technology not all of them rely on turning water into steam to drive a turbine, here's one that is regularly used in space http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radiois...tric_generator
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    (Original post by fire2burn)
    There many different types of nuclear reactor technology not all of them rely on turning water into steam to drive a turbine, here's one that is regularly used in space http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radiois...tric_generator
    Strictly, this isn't a nuclear reactor. It is a large lump of radioactive material (usually Pu-238) which generates heat through radioactive decay, and that heat is converted into electricity.

    Proper fission reactors have been used on space missions. They produce kW quantities of heat, much more than radioisotope heat sources or solar panels. Almost all were Russian, fuelled with highly enriched uranium and cooled with liquid metal (Na/K alloy).

    In answer to the cooling question- space is very very cold, so it is easy to dump heat if necessary
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    (Original post by Mithra)
    You'd need an atmosphere and gravity for 'boiling' water to rise (Also water 'boiling' would be rather different).
    True, but you could induce 'gravity' by rotational motion. The force wouldn't be that huge, but should suffice. I may be wrong though. Didn't think about it that much.
 
 
 
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