Turn on thread page Beta

Thoughts on work in western society watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Here's what I've been thinking lately, let me know what you think.

    It seems to me most people in western society have to work in order to get food, shelter etc. In addition I think most people don't enjoy their work, this is understandable since as a general rule jobs have become more and more repetitive and mundane as time has gone by. A standard job may be 9-5, 5 days a week, and I think it's fair to say even the least physically demanding jobs are tiring and so by the end of the day many people just want to eat dinner relax in front of the TV before going to sleep. This leaves just two days a week to make the most of life, after the weekly shop of course.
    So if the above seems logical then most people in western society spend most of thier lives doing something which they don't enjoy. Is this good?
    As someone who is meant to be entering the job market soon this is not a very inspiring prospect. I guess i'll have to be lucky to spend even half my life doing stuff I enjoy.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Robots will soon constitute the majority of the manual labour workforce, and in another 20 or 30 years will have surpassed human competency in most work-related areas. So I wouldn't worry too much about slaving away at a unsatisfying/uninteresting job for the rest of your life.

    Spoiler:
    Show
    Instead, worry about your future role within the Human Resistance Corps :ninja:
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Beneb)
    Robots will soon constitute the majority of the manual labour workforce, and in another 20 or 30 years will have surpassed human competency in most jobs. So I wouldn't worry too much about slaving away at some mind-numbing job for the rest of your life.
    Yer because manual labour jobs ad so much more fun lol
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by DKer)
    Here's what I've been thinking lately, let me know what you think.
    Yeh this is a fact of life I'm afraid. If you work 9-5 from when you are 20 to when you are 65 then...

    45 years x 265 working days x 8 hours = 95 400 hours, or call it 100,000 hours with commuting (assuming you live close to you work)

    100,000 hours / 8765 hours in a year = 11.4 whole years of your life are spent working!

    Every extra hour per day you spend working or traveling to work adds on 1.3 years!

    Get a nice job, work from home or get your own farm or something..

    On the plus side, if you make a lot of money you could retire early and have an awesome 30 years of doing whatever the f*** you want.
    Offline

    13
    (Original post by DKer)
    Here's what I've been thinking lately, let me know what you think.

    It seems to me most people in western society have to work in order to get food, shelter etc. In addition I think most people don't enjoy their work, this is understandable since as a general rule jobs have become more and more repetitive and mundane as time has gone by. A standard job may be 9-5, 5 days a week, and I think it's fair to say even the least physically demanding jobs are tiring and so by the end of the day many people just want to eat dinner relax in front of the TV before going to sleep. This leaves just two days a week to make the most of life, after the weekly shop of course.
    So if the above seems logical then most people in western society spend most of thier lives doing something which they don't enjoy. Is this good?
    As someone who is meant to be entering the job market soon this is not a very inspiring prospect. I guess i'll have to be lucky to spend even half my life doing stuff I enjoy.
    You might be interested in this analysis:

    Thus, although there is a lack of survey data measuring trends over time, there is considerable anecdotal evidence suggesting that perceptions of work have changed quite radically in industrialised societies in recent years. This tendency is reflected in:

    Dissolving ties to employers.

    It has become commonplace since the 1970s that the idea of a ‘job for life’ – so widespread in the earlier part of the twentieth century in the industrialised West (even more in Japan) – is in the process of disappearing. This trend has been caused by a number of factors – notably (a) rapid technological change and consequential incidence of higher productivity and reduced need for manpower for a given level of output, and (b) intensifying competition in the more globalised market combined with rising unemployment and the consequently dwindling bargaining power of labour. The result is a greater casualisation of workforces – with a rising proportion of workers on term contracts and enjoying reduced benefits. This in turn promotes a growing tendency, contrary to what is claimed by human resource management experts, for workers to be viewed as largely expendable commodities, who in their turn feel less and less commitment or loyalty to the organisation for which they work.

    Spreading sense of pointlessness of work.


    Along with the increasing commodification of workers there has, not surprisingly, developed a sense among many employees that they have little or no meaningful role in their jobs such as to give them a sense of their own identity or of a purpose other than that of simply turning up so as to collect a pay cheque at the end of the month. By the same token there is a perception that employer organisations themselves are finding it increasingly hard to instil in their staff any sense that they have a meaningful role or motivation to work hard. (Of course it would be wrong to suggest this description applies to all categories of workers – but perhaps more specifically to the very large number who are in menial, clerical or even middle-management positions, who are also those most liable to be made redundant when rationalisation is required.)

    Abandonment of the idea of a career.


    Faced with the reality that formal employment opportunities that are secure, fulfilling and financially rewarding are becoming ever more scarce, a growing number of young people are looking at alternative lifestyles and activities. In Britain this is manifested in the apparent growth in volunteering, perhaps suggesting a perception that the prospect of having a career in the traditional sense is no longer either appealing or attainable for most of them. As against this, voluntary work may appear, particularly for young people, to offer (at least for relatively short periods) a more satisfying activity without necessarily entailing huge financial sacrifice – given that volunteers can still receive state welfare benefits. It may also be the case that many people are attracted by the fact that as volunteers they are working for a non-profit organisation. Ironically perhaps, the whole process is being encouraged by government – at both national and local level (and by both main parties) – evidently because they perceive volunteering to be a potential source of cheap labour for the charities that are increasingly being used to deliver social services which it is perhaps felt the state can no longer afford to provide at market rates of pay.
    ...

    Acceptance of long-term unemployment.

    Another facet of the revolution in the labour market is the seeming recognition in a number of developed countries that a large number of people have come to be perceived as unemployable in relation to the actual potential demand for their limited skills. In Britain such people – accounting for as much as 9-10 per cent of the labour force – have come to be classified as effectively disabled and therefore eligible for incapacity benefit, even though many of them would be quite willing and able to work if only there were effective demand – that is, at minimally adequate levels of pay – for their labour.

    Harry Shutt, Beyond the Profits System (Zed Books, 2010), pp. 135-9.
    Offline

    13
    (Original post by Beneb)
    Robots will soon constitute the majority of the manual labour workforce, and in another 20 or 30 years will have surpassed human competency in most work-related area. So I wouldn't worry too much about slaving away at a unsatisfying/uninteresting job for the rest of your life.

    Spoiler:
    Show
    Instead, worry about your future role within the Human Resistance Corps :ninja:
    If we need to work to get an income (other than through welfare), how will this be affected by the change you expect?
 
 
 
The home of Results and Clearing

3,015

people online now

1,567,000

students helped last year
Poll
How are you feeling about GCSE results day?
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.