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    Hello

    I am an undergraduate student currently studying philosophy at Southampton. At A Leven I got
    A* psychology
    A Philosophy
    B History.

    I have decided i would like to quit university, use the next year to do chemistry and biology A levels and get into medical school.

    How likely is it that i would be accepted? Im worried that after quitting university it would make me look uncommitted to medical schools and they would not accept me?

    any ideasss ?
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    Don't you need 3 sciences to do medicine?
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    I'm pretty sure its 2
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    I think it seems to be Chemistry with one other science ?
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    You have pretty much the same grades and subjects at a-level as me! (except I got an A in psychology rather than A*). I'm doing a psychology degree at the moment but decided I wanted to do medicine in my first year. I did comtemplate quitting but you have to consider how this will reflect your level of comittment.

    I chose to start a-level chem alongside my degree...and I was going to start biology but thought it would be taking a bit too much on. If I could go back in time I would have not started a-level chem (not easy juggling full time work, a degree, work exp, volunteer work and an a-level!).

    My suggestion is to finish your degree and then either apply for graduate entry medicine (aim for at least a 2.1) or apply for a foundation 6 year medicine course. You would be eligble I think because of your good (non-science) a-levels....Or finish your degree then do an access to medicine course rather than chem and bio.
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    Apart from a handful of Cambridge colleges, no medical school requires more than 2 sciences.

    Applying to medical school is by no means a sure thing so you are taking a big risk by dropping out. I think you should talk to your university careers service, attend some medical open days and talk to people, and consider all your possible options before going ahead.

    The overall chances of getting in are quoted as about 40% (based on 60% getting 4 rejections). Obviously your specific chances depend on your academic record, medical\caring work experience, your performance in entrance tests and at interview.
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    I think med schools would question your sticktoitiveness

    4 AS levels must be taken at the same time, so you couldn't do them separately unless you wanted to pick up 2 more
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    (Original post by SteveCrain)
    4 AS levels must be taken at the same time, so you couldn't do them separately unless you wanted to pick up 2 more
    Really? I've not heard this before but it may well be correct. However, I've emailed a few unis and told them I'm doing chemistry now, alongside my degree to add to my other three a-levels I did in school. So I never did four AS together.
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    (Original post by kateb566)
    Really? I've not heard this before but it may well be correct. However, I've emailed a few unis and told them I'm doing chemistry now, alongside my degree to add to my other three a-levels I did in school. So I never did four AS together.
    Yeh but you will have a degree, which renders A levels not the most important qualification.

    Pretty much all schools want for AS levels done at the same time, even though they are not often included in offers.
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    Ah ok, good. Had me panicking a bit there!
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    Dropping out isn't going to win you any points for medical admissions. Why invest £250k in someone who has a history of dropping out?

    Have you thought about graduate entry?
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    My dropping out of university was held against me during my first medicine application. I only managed 2 interviews (both very late), and no matter how well I explained my reasoning at interview, they kept hammering at it. Ultimately, I ended up spending over half of each interview defending my withdrawal and trying to steer it towards more positive reflections.

    Medical Schools have a huge number of applicants every year. They will use any excuse possible to cut down the number of people they have to consider, and some medical schools may not like your cloudy academic history. If you do get to interview, you'll most likely be doing so in an atmosphere where you're constantly having to tiptoe around the negatives of it. And if you end up being a borderline candidate, chances are they'll take the applicant with the clean history over you. I'm afraid that's the reality of it.

    That's not to say you can't drop out and get into medicine. Plenty have, but you will be at a disadvantage. My advice would be this:

    (1) If you really don't like your current degree and don't feel like you have the motivation to stick it out and get a 2:1, then quit and spend as much time as possible preparing your application for medicine. If you feel like you can tough it out, stick with it and apply later.

    (2) When you do apply, make sure you pick your universities wisely. This is pretty much universal for everyone who applies to medicine, but it'll be particularly important for you. E-mail any medical schools you're considering and ask them if anything in your application might negatively affect your likelihood of being accepted.


    I got rejected after I'd dropped out, did another course, applied as a graduate this year, and now have 3 offers (with another withdrawn).
 
 
 
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