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    At 23 I have done the 9 to 5 office thing for five years now and it's not my cup of tea so I am looking at a career change. It would mean a lot of sacrifices in my personal life for both me and my missus but I am seriously looking into the possibility of jacking my job in and going to uni to get a degree and become a qualified teacher.

    At the moment I am leaning towards primary teaching for two reasons - 1) I am told there is now a national push to get male teachers into primary schools as the current ratio is about 1:7 in favour of women, and 2) I'm not sure I'm best suited to the type of g*b****es that I would find in a high school.

    For any teachers out there, although everyone talks about the holidays (13 weeks), what are your hours on the average day? How long do you have to spend lesson planning and marking?

    For me I think there would be a good element of job satisfaction and the variety of teaching so many subject would make it an enjoyable job to have.

    For those doing the 3 year course in Primary education:

    - When you're in Uni, how many days a week is it?
    - How often are the placements, and for how long each time? Just days or is it weeks at a time?
    - What sort of stuff are they teaching on the course as an overview?
    - Is there an interview process to get onto the course? Or is it a case of if you've got the ucas points, you're in?
    - In regards to doing the placements in schools, can you do all of them in the same school or do you have to go to several different ones?
    - I'd be looking to start the course in Sept 2012 when I'll be 24, will I qualify for any loans or grants?

    Having made the decision to seriously look into teaching only yesterday, (I went to one of them TDA events in Manchester on Saturday) when I got into my car the first song that came on the radio was Man in the Mirror by Michael Jackson. For those of you who know the lyrics, I'm sure you would agree that is more than just a coincidence. So...

    Overall, would you recommend it as a career or not? TIA.
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    Not being rude or anything, but you need to read the news.Teachers are being made unemployed and re-dundant. There are no jobs out there for teachers. Male teachers in primary? there's a good reason for them not going into it,why do you think it would be any different to you,buy hey, follow your dream if you like
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    You need to get some experience in a classroom before you decide anything. Through that experience you can begin to understand if teaching is the career for you, plus i am sure you will need some experience before you apply for a course anyway.

    you may need to take some holiday time in your current job for a week in a classroom but it will be really important for you to help guage if teaching is for you

    hope that helped a bit

    oh and as for primary teaching, considering overall the number of pgce primary places have increased i would conclude there is still a need for them!
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    @horsedobbin: Teachers being made redundant? Then who is teaching the children, themselves? I sincerely doubt that. If anyone in education is getting hit by government cuts then surely it's the teaching assistants.

    Due to a little thing called 'equality', primary schools now have to boost their number of male teachers in the coming years. So provided I'm good at it, I think I should be alright.
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    I would advise against primary teaching, it is soooooo competitive. My gf is doing a BEd in Primary (4 year course) and is going to finish in 2012. Even with her WEALTH of experience incl a gap year as a teaching assistant in a special needs school, special awards and all the extra placements she can get on, including all her uni stuff on top and working in a school holiday club in holidays, she is far from guarenteed a job. The government have pushed too many people into the profession with PGCE courses left right and centre.

    The hours in teaching are unbelieveably hard, you will be working from 7am-10pm at least every day, especially to begin with. Without the holidays included, the money would certainly not be worth it (even if it is now). You can forget about any social life during the week and minimal at weekends. It will be constantly on your mind even in the holidays.

    My advise would be do not go into teaching unless you are certain you want to pursue it all the way. If you start a teaching course and realise half way through it isnt for you (a lot of people do this), then that will be a complete waste of time because you cannot do much else with that qualifacation.

    Office work is boring yes I have experienced exactly the same as you except my experience comes from my gap year before Uni. I knew that office work wasnt for me, but there are many more jobs out there that dont require you to be stuck at a desk all day, go and speak to a careers advisor because I would not recommend teaching to anyone who is on the fence about it.
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    My mother is a reception school teacher and I'm training to be one currently. My mum works from about 8am until about 5:30pm in school so is out the house from 7:30am until 6pm. Then most nights (3-4) a week and once at the weekend she comes home and works for another hour or two doing planning, marking and looking for resources for future lessons. If you think teachers clock off at 3:30pm then think again!

    I'm doing a two year HND course and then will finish my training in an additional final year. Uni is two days a week, one day is a home study day (don't think this is a day off, there's far too much work to do!) and the other two days are in placements (8:30am - 4:30pm). There is 800 hours that need to be done in placement before the end of the course.

    We are taught a broad spectrum of subjects including but not limited to; play and learning, child observations, protection of children, children with special needs etc etc. There's about 10 different lessons we have crammed in to those two days a week, so it's very intense.

    UCAS points isn't enough, candidates are interviewed and rightly so. The course itself is very hard work and the career of being a teacher or early years professional in another compacity is even harder, I'd be worried if candidates weren't vetted!

    You have to work with different age groups, not necessarily by moving to different schools but I think it's helpful to experience two or three different placements anyway.

    As a student you will qualify for the student loan, grants and bursaries will depend on your income.

    Hope that helps Teaching is very rewarding, and for me personally it's my calling, but please don't take the decision to be a teacher lightly as it's very hard work and you really have to love your job to justify that.
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    @dessie

    I say go for it, if it's what you want to do don't let other people put you off. However primary teaching is extremely competitive, so you will need to get plenty of experience before you submit your application. If you apply with no experience then the uni won't even consider your application. Hope this helped, and good luck with whatever you decide to do
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    (Original post by Dessie)
    @horsedobbin: Teachers being made redundant? Then who is teaching the children, themselves? I sincerely doubt that. If anyone in education is getting hit by government cuts then surely it's the teaching assistants.

    Due to a little thing called 'equality', primary schools now have to boost their number of male teachers in the coming years. So provided I'm good at it, I think I should be alright.
    Well sorry you haven't read the news yet, so have a look at this
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2...taff-redundant

    teachers are being layed off , class sizes will get bigger and more classses will be taught by minimum waged cover supervisers with no qualificatons

    hey, but go ahead and follow your dream

    edit
    and there are plenty of unemployed teachers out there for you to enjoy competing with
    http://www.tes.co.uk/article.aspx?storycode=6059576
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    I know a lot of primary school teachers and from what they all say to me, OP you are correct. If you are a guy you will get a job easily. There is a massive shortfall of male teachers, and guys will get enrolled on courses at unis & employed at schools much more easily than an often better qualified girl.

    I believe I am right in saying that placements are blocks, so you will have teaching for X weeks, then placement for Y weeks etc.

    And you definitely need experience as a TA for a week or 2 before applying.

    The first year or two once you are qualified is a bit of a nightmare because of all the planning, but obviously you can recycle much of this from year to year, so it gets easier with time.

    I often work with a few teachers at weekends doing corporate work, and they seem to have most of the weekend free to do what they want, and in this instance that is earn some extra cash. But equally others I know are propered knackered after such a full on week, and spend a bit of the weekend planning.

    If you work at a good school, then I can imagine it'll be no problem and that it'll be a real enjoyable job.

    But should you only be able to find a job at a bad school, it will be a very difficult job. A friend teaches 5 year olds in a **** area and has kids punch, kick & headbutt her all the time. The parents aren't interested, and blame & even threaten the school & staff. She's working there in the hope that it'll look good on her CV and prove she can deal with even the worst kids, in the hope of getting a job at a better school that she will enjoy.

    Good luck with it, if thats what you really want to do. Its never to late to change career. I've just switched career at 24, no point living with regrets!
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    (Original post by OJHW)
    I know a lot of primary school teachers and from what they all say to me, OP you are correct. If you are a guy you will get a job easily. There is a massive shortfall of male teachers, and guys will get enrolled on courses at unis & employed at schools much more easily than an often better qualified girl.

    I believe I am right in saying that placements are blocks, so you will have teaching for X weeks, then placement for Y weeks etc.

    And you definitely need experience as a TA for a week or 2 before applying.

    The first year or two once you are qualified is a bit of a nightmare because of all the planning, but obviously you can recycle much of this from year to year, so it gets easier with time.

    I often work with a few teachers at weekends doing corporate work, and they seem to have most of the weekend free to do what they want, and in this instance that is earn some extra cash. But equally others I know are propered knackered after such a full on week, and spend a bit of the weekend planning.

    If you work at a good school, then I can imagine it'll be no problem and that it'll be a real enjoyable job.

    But should you only be able to find a job at a bad school, it will be a very difficult job. A friend teaches 5 year olds in a **** area and has kids punch, kick & headbutt her all the time. The parents aren't interested, and blame & even threaten the school & staff. She's working there in the hope that it'll look good on her CV and prove she can deal with even the worst kids, in the hope of getting a job at a better school that she will enjoy.

    Good luck with it, if thats what you really want to do. Its never to late to change career. I've just switched career at 24, no point living with regrets!
    so why
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    (Original post by Horsedobbin)
    Well sorry you haven't read the news yet, so have a look at this
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2...taff-redundant

    teachers are being layed off , class sizes will get bigger and more classses will be taught by minimum waged cover supervisers with no qualificatons

    hey, but go ahead and follow your dream

    edit
    and there are plenty of unemployed teachers out there for you to enjoy competing with
    http://www.tes.co.uk/article.aspx?storycode=6059576
    I think your article may be more relavent to senior school teachers?

    The vocational subject teachers esp, as the way the league tables work for GCSE's is changing, so schools are now going to have to push traditional subjects more.

    So I would of thought although vocational subject teachers will decrease, the number of traditional subject teachers will inevitably have to increase to counteract the increase in students sitting these subjects?

    I wouldn't of thought these changes would have a drastic affect on primary school teachers. Unless a mass of vocational teachers made redundant requalify to teach primary school kids?

    But I am not in the teaching profession, so this is just my interpretation.
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    (Original post by Horsedobbin)
    so why do you think all the male unemployed teachers aren't queuing up to work in primary?
    Teaching primary school is nothing like teaching senior school.
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    (Original post by OJHW)
    I think your article may be more relavent to senior school teachers?

    The vocational subject teachers esp, as the way the league tables work for GCSE's is changing, so schools are now going to have to push traditional subjects more.

    So I would of thought although vocational subject teachers will decrease, the number of traditional subject teachers will inevitably have to increase to counteract the increase in students sitting these subjects?

    I wouldn't of thought these changes would have a drastic affect on primary school teachers. Unless a mass of vocational teachers made redundant requalify to teach primary school kids?

    But I am not in the teaching profession, so this is just my interpretation.
    well for your information, any qualified teacher with a teaching qualification that is accepted in the uk can teach in a primary school if the school wants them. There is no legal rquirement for them to retrain fro primary.
    So why do you think male unemployed UK teachers are not queuing up to teach in primary or doing voluntary work in primary to make themselves more attractive to primary schools?
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    Why don't you just answer the question for us, i'm waiting here on tenterhooks...
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    (Original post by Horsedobbin)
    well for your information, any qualified teacher with a teaching qualification that is accepted in the uk can teach in a primary school if the school wants them. There is no legal rquirement for them to retrain fro primary.
    So why do you think male unemployed UK teachers are not queuing up to teach in primary or doing voluntary work in primary to make themselves more attractive to primary schools?
    Like I said, just because someone teaches at senior school level, does not necessarily mean they would want to teach at primary school level. Just like someone who teaches at university level doesn't necessarily want to teach someone at primary school, senior school or with learning difficulties. Each different form of teaching requires a different set of job skills, which usually attracts a different type of person.

    For this reason I would question how many of the senior school teaching staff made redundant (20% apparently, despite cuts being estimated at 1.5% per pupil?) would want to teach at primary school level. Especially considering many of the teachers to be made redundant are from vocational subjects like manufacturing, engineering & business. I would also wonder how many of these vocational teachers actually have a degree (let alone a teaching degree), and not simply experience in their field?

    I presumed that you would need to re-qualify as a primary school teacher as many teachers at senior schools do not have degrees in teaching, and are simply graduates from their subject field. So they would need to do a PGCE. And also many people I know who have trained as primary school teachers have trained to teach kids of a relatively specific age group (I believe it may be 4-7 & 8-11?), which obviously shows that the training is quite age specific. I doubt a senior school teacher even with a degree in teaching would know the industry accepted ways to teach kids at primary school.
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    Firstly thank you to everyone who has offered up help and advice, it is greatly appreciated.

    Horsedobbin - thanks for the articles, however if the content is true, can I ask why on any given day when I'm watching TV will I without fail see the TDA teacher adverts? Surely if there are already enough teachers to go around, they wouldn't keep advertising?

    Also, on your second link I read all the comments at the bottom of the article and would just like to highlight this:

    A few facts to contradict the argument that too many teachers are being trained:
    1. There are 37,000 trainee teachers this year.
    2. 80 per cent are studying on university PGCE courses.
    3. Only 2 per cent will enter teaching through the Teach First scheme.
    4. This year’s Good Teacher Training Guide reported that just 71 per cent of teacher trainees in 2008/09 were in any kind of teaching six months later.

    The 71% mentioned above covers those who drop out during the course or are removed as teaching is not suitable for them. The evidence clearly shows that large numbers of trainee's are needed each year to replace those lost to the profession. A quick calculation of 71% of the 80% of the 37,000 comes to over 21,000 trainee teachers NEEDED just to maintain the status quo each year.

    The idea that somehow teacher training is producing an endless over-supply of teachers is simply a myth and not supported by evidence. End of story. This anti-teacher-training propaganda is part of Michael Goves attempt to transfer the training of teachers from university PGCE's to school based programmes. He wants to close university education departments & cannot do this while using current actual evidence.

    Having seen the myths created around the civil service involving over-paid, under-worked staff with gold plated pensions before the ConDem's sacked 500,000 civil servants; I just hope the public are getting wise to the tactics about to be employed in the education sector!

    More current evidence.
    1. The TDA are very good at planning how many teachers are required each year and only fund that number of places for ITE providers one year in advance.
    2. Every week in the TES employment section there ARE jobs. There are 258 this week on a rather 'slow' week.

    By the way the TDA are on Mr.Goves Quango-hit-list and if they are assassinated like the GTC it really will be the Wild West in terms of training teachers........................ ..Who'll ensure quality? Will a teacher in trained in school A be accepted for a job in school B? Who'll match demand to supply, especially in shortage subjects like Maths & Physics? If markets are allowed to dictate 'price' will we see the 'price' of Maths & Physics teachers rise due to a current shortage or the 'price' of English teachers fall due to a glut? (Education is not & never has been a market; the sooner our politicians realise this the better for all of us.)
    Is this wrong then in your opinion?
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    Yes, in my humble opinion
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    (Original post by Dessie)
    Firstly thank you to everyone who has offered up help and advice, it is greatly appreciated.

    Horsedobbin - thanks for the articles, however if the content is true, can I ask why on any given day when I'm watching TV will I without fail see the TDA teacher adverts? Surely if there are already enough teachers to go around, they wouldn't keep advertising?

    Also, on your second link I read all the comments at the bottom of the article and would just like to highlight this:



    Is this wrong then in your opinion?
    see this
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    Hi,

    I would echo one of the previous posts that says get some classroom experience first, both to check it's right for you, and to have the necessary experience for the application. And never underestimate how long this can take to sort out - unless you have a friend working in a school where you can call in a favour, it can be very tough finding a school to take you for a week or two, and CRBs can take a long time to sort etc.

    @ whoever advised against primary as it's so competitive - what a defeatist attitude! If you want something then go for it, be prepared to work hard at it, and if you don't get a job immediately after, there's always supply work while you keep applying. If you really want it, and have tried other jobs (as you have) then you may regret it for the rest of your life if you don't give it a go. Also the older you get the harder it is financially to be a student, so do it now while you still can.

    I know you only thought seriously about this in the last few days, but I think the best answers to your more specific q's on placements, course content, entry procedure etc will be found found on the uni websites for the courses you're looking at and one the student finance pages. Forums are great for getting people's ideas, advice and opinions, but you cant expect people to do your research for youwhen the answers are all there if you look for them.

    Also if you want advice from existing teachers you're better to post on the TES forums, as only students will be on TSR...

    Good luck with whatever you decide!
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    Horsedobbin what's wrong with you?! Why are you coming into this thread to be negative and spiteful to the threadstarter when he just wants advice about a career change? Go away.

    Dessie, good luck It's extremely hard work, you will have no social life at all and you will be up planning until midnight on your placements and NQT year, but it will be worth it, teaching is the most satisfying job.

    Also, loooong holidays and good union representation
 
 
 
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