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    Hi,

    Hoping some can help, I have received an firm offer to study BA Applied economics at Portsmouth uni and also had a firm offer to study Bsc Economics at Plymouth, really confused on two fronts. The 1st being is it better to do a Bsc in Eco rather than BA Applied eco in terms of future employment etc and 2nd which uni is better Portsmouth or Plymouth for economics?

    Any help and guidance would be very much appreciated
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    They seriously created a course called 'Applied Economics' :lolwut: Sound like their making up courses just to get more students. I would personally go for Economics at Plymouth to stop the inevitable chuckle an economics student would give you if you said you did applied economics.
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    (Original post by yoyo462001)
    They seriously created a course called 'Applied Economics' :lolwut: Sound like their making up courses just to get more students. I would personally go for Economics at Plymouth to stop the inevitable chuckle an economics student would give you if you said you did applied economics.
    Thanks for your thoughts. I was thinking that Plymouth was my best option but I cant find any feedback on the Bsc economics course at Plymouth.
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    Not really sure what "applied economics" entails, but I'd choose the BSc over the BA.
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    BSc degrees = more maths, employers like them better.
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    (Original post by Elasticity)
    BSc degrees = more maths, employers like them better.
    Nonsense.
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    (Original post by yoyo462001)
    Nonsense.
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...._BA_Economics

    Oxbridge, Durham aside:
    The title BA at times can mean flexibility while at other times it can mean a more qualitative and essay based Economics programme.
    Students studying on a BSc Economics degree course will learn pure mathematics and statistical theory and techniques for application in economic theory. The use of mathematical methods has become increasingly more important in economics, allowing a more rigorous analysis of economic theory and permitting the precise formulation of abstract economic situations.
    Students studying on a BA Economics degree course may use some mathematics, but to a much lesser extent than those on a BSc Economics programme.
    BSc Economics tends to offer a wider range of career opportunities, as the quantitative element is especially appealing to jobs in the financial services industry requiring an affinity for numeracy, or even quantitative ability. Careers in quantitative finance, such as investment banking, prefer BSc Economics graduates (or Oxbridge and Durham BAs) because of the mathematics and statistics they have learnt, which is not only a key aspect of the job, but demonstrates rigorous and analytical thinking.


    I know this is mainly about finance and banking jobs but still the vast majority of big employers are going to prefer people who have done considerable maths alongside their economics.
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    (Original post by Elasticity)
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...._BA_Economics

    Oxbridge, Durham aside:
    The title BA at times can mean flexibility while at other times it can mean a more qualitative and essay based Economics programme.
    Students studying on a BSc Economics degree course will learn pure mathematics and statistical theory and techniques for application in economic theory. The use of mathematical methods has become increasingly more important in economics, allowing a more rigorous analysis of economic theory and permitting the precise formulation of abstract economic situations.
    Students studying on a BA Economics degree course may use some mathematics, but to a much lesser extent than those on a BSc Economics programme.
    BSc Economics tends to offer a wider range of career opportunities, as the quantitative element is especially appealing to jobs in the financial services industry requiring an affinity for numeracy, or even quantitative ability. Careers in quantitative finance, such as investment banking, prefer BSc Economics graduates (or Oxbridge and Durham BAs) because of the mathematics and statistics they have learnt, which is not only a key aspect of the job, but demonstrates rigorous and analytical thinking.


    I know this is mainly about finance and banking jobs but still the vast majority of big employers are going to prefer people who have done considerable maths alongside their economics.
    Are you being serious? Do you have any idea what you're actually saying and are you seriously using a TSR faq, which some of it I wrote, to show that a BSc is preferred by employers.
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    (Original post by yoyo462001)
    Are you being serious? Do you have any idea what you're actually saying and are you seriously using a TSR faq, which some of it I wrote, to show that a BSc is preferred by employers.
    Yup.
    I have my opinion, you have yours.
    Feel free to explain yours rather than just stating I'm nonsensical.
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    (Original post by Elasticity)
    Yup.
    I have my opinion, you have yours.
    Feel free to explain yours rather than just stating I'm nonsensical.
    There's so much wrong with what you're saying that I don't have the time or patience to list them. I imagine you haven'y graduated or got to a stage where you're even looking for jobs so you're most likely an A level student. So when you get to looking for jobs, come back and read that and tell me what you think, I'm positive you'll laugh at it.
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    (Original post by yoyo462001)
    There's so much wrong with what you're saying that I don't have the time or patience to list them. I imagine you haven'y graduated or got to a stage where you're even looking for jobs so you're most likely an A level student. So when you get to looking for jobs, come back and read that and tell me what you think, I'm positive you'll laugh at it.
    I would be curious as to these reasons If you don't mind posting them up. I personally think they each are good for specific things, but have never really thought about it in detail. No worries if you can't be arsed
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    Your degree is pretty much a check box just like with having a 2:1. Even in banking having a mathematical degree doesn't help you much unless you're going for a role in places where they like maths graduates such as quants or structuring the former will ask for PHD students anyways, otherwise it's all fair game. Firms are far more interested in what you can offer as a person, the things you've gotten up to. Go to any company presentation and they will all stress that they want competencies, speak to HR they will say competencies never.

    Having a BSc in Economics wont get you closer to any job than having a BA in economics, unless these jobs are mathematically rigorous such as actuarial, your typical finance job (if such a thing exists) isn't heavy on the maths, we have computers for that, as long as you can read graphs you're fine, it's not like you're at your desk forming these exotic financial products. Plus most jobs are on the job training anyways.

    This is brief and I'm not saying in any way I know everything, but stating that a BSc is preferred by employers is something an A level student would think, something they'll tell themselves to reassure them that getting a job will be easy:

    Economics---tick
    BSc ---tick
    ?????
    Job
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    (Original post by yoyo462001)
    Nonsense.
    Are you that insecure about your BA that you have to protest against every single comment posted on TSR which even remotely suggests that BSc > BA? Your one man crusade is getting incredibly boring...
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    (Original post by Brian Butterfield)
    Are you that insecure about your BA that you have to protest against every single comment posted on TSR which even remotely suggests that BSc > BA? Your one man crusade is getting incredibly boring...
    :rofl: I've already secured a job, I get to study theoretical econometrics in my 'less mathematically rigorous' BA, which I thoroughly enjoy. Why would I be insecure. Like I said earlier it's only A level students that tend to have this notion that they're so much more employable because they do Economics and they do a BSc. The last time I commented on the BA/BSc topic was probably more than six months ago, but I'm flattered that you've done your research on me.
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    (Original post by yoyo462001)
    There's so much wrong with what you're saying that I don't have the time or patience to list them. I imagine you haven'y graduated or got to a stage where you're even looking for jobs so you're most likely an A level student. So when you get to looking for jobs, come back and read that and tell me what you think, I'm positive you'll laugh at it.
    I just offered you the opportunity to explain your view, I would be listening to you, you don't have to listen to me, I'm not the one ranting on about how someone is nonsensical.

    Surely converting someone's opinion is a good thing? So why not try it.

    Anyway reading other posts in this thread I'm satisfied with your answers and can appreciate that a lot of jobs maths isn't truly necessary, but don't be such an a-hole about it in future.
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    (Original post by Elasticity)
    I just offered you the opportunity to explain your view, I would be listening to you, you don't have to listen to me, I'm not the one ranting on about how someone is nonsensical.

    Surely converting someone's opinion is a good thing? So why not try it.

    Anyway reading other posts in this thread I'm satisfied with your answers and can appreciate that a lot of jobs maths isn't truly necessary, but don't be such an a-hole about it in future.
    Thanks for all your comments, not sure I have an answer, I did not do that well in maths at A level got a D so I suspect that the BA economic route might be better for me than the Bsc route. I still have had no feedback on if it is better to study economics at Portsmouth or Plymouth?
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    (Original post by yoyo462001)
    They seriously created a course called 'Applied Economics' :lolwut: Sound like their making up courses just to get more students. I would personally go for Economics at Plymouth to stop the inevitable chuckle an economics student would give you if you said you did applied economics.
    The irony of you saying this and then having a hissy fit over the BA vs BSc argument is quite funny.
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    (Original post by Overmars)
    The irony of you saying this and then having a hissy fit over the BA vs BSc argument is quite funny.
    Yeah but the difference I highlighted with the Applied/straight economics was being laughed at by other economics students :p:
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    (Original post by yoyo462001)
    Your degree is pretty much a check box just like with having a 2:1. Even in banking having a mathematical degree doesn't help you much unless you're going for a role in places where they like maths graduates such as quants or structuring the former will ask for PHD students anyways, otherwise it's all fair game. Firms are far more interested in what you can offer as a person, the things you've gotten up to. Go to any company presentation and they will all stress that they want competencies, speak to HR they will say competencies never.
    Wouldn't it have been easier to just post this paragraph first rather than just acting up and getting angry? If someone is ignorant, you might as well attempt to correct them rather than just mindlessly antagonising them.
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    (Original post by innerhollow)
    Wouldn't it have been easier to just post this paragraph first rather than just acting up and getting angry? If someone is ignorant, you might as well attempt to correct them rather than just mindlessly antagonising them.
    Thumbs up.
 
 
 
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