Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hello everyone,

    I've been traipsing around the forums doing as much reading up as I can on the opinions various people have on the law schools in London, as well as the empirical evidence that they provide to back up said opinions. The general consensus seems to be that law at LSE/UCL trump King's, and with good reason.

    There are a few common reasons I've seen for this consensus. The first is that the UCAS entry tariff standings place LCE on top, with UCL being second and King's being the lowest, lower than Durham as well.

    Secondly, the reputation that the schools have. As no one really takes league tables that seriously, I've looked at many responses on TSR forums (whether they are reliable, that I do not know) and it seems that LSE once again comes out shining, with its reputation being highly acclaimed, followed by UCL but King's is not mentioned quite as often.

    Finally, and most relevantly when looking to study law, the quality/reputation/teaching of the law school itself (as just because a college is internationally reputed in general does not mean that its law school is one of the best), and although king's is still considered one of the top in the UK, people still recommend UCL/LSE over it, even for a specific law degree.

    I guess an educated guess could be made by now that I have an offer for Law from King's. I am aware that its law school is a prestigious institution and that it would be fortuitous for me to study there. What I would like to know are the reasons for this ranking of UCL/LSE over King's in the eyes of so many. I've read some posts about King's law school having some financial issues. Is this really affecting the institution and the quality of its degree?

    (Of course I realize it is possible and only natural for people on TSR make posts based on what college they attend and not based on hard fact, and hence these posts would contain biases towards their own college)

    Also, not being in the know about such things and not having the opportunity to talk to people who are, would employers look at a King's graduate with prejudice compared to/consider one inferior to a UCL/LSE graduate? (assuming both get equal honors)

    Finally, I know LSE is pretty much standalone, but is the so-called 'rivalry' between KCL and UCL all that it is hyped up to be? (it even has its own section in wikipedia) Is there actual bad blood between students from both schools or is this just something that students laugh about together while meeting up for a pint or two (can they actually be friends?)

    I hope I could get responses with good folks out there with experience about these matters. Thanks for answering my queries in advance (:
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    KCL should be fine for a career in law. The other departments of the college aren't of the same class, hence why its overall reputation isn't that great. But the law school is good, and is kcl's flagship course
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by geronemo)
    Hello everyone,

    I've been traipsing around the forums doing as much reading up as I can on the opinions various people have on the law schools in London, as well as the empirical evidence that they provide to back up said opinions. The general consensus seems to be that law at LSE/UCL trump King's, and with good reason.

    There are a few common reasons I've seen for this consensus. The first is that the UCAS entry tariff standings place LCE on top, with UCL being second and King's being the lowest, lower than Durham as well.

    Secondly, the reputation that the schools have. As no one really takes league tables that seriously, I've looked at many responses on TSR forums (whether they are reliable, that I do not know) and it seems that LSE once again comes out shining, with its reputation being highly acclaimed, followed by UCL but King's is not mentioned quite as often.

    Finally, and most relevantly when looking to study law, the quality/reputation/teaching of the law school itself (as just because a college is internationally reputed in general does not mean that its law school is one of the best), and although king's is still considered one of the top in the UK, people still recommend UCL/LSE over it, even for a specific law degree.

    I guess an educated guess could be made by now that I have an offer for Law from King's. I am aware that its law school is a prestigious institution and that it would be fortuitous for me to study there. What I would like to know are the reasons for this ranking of UCL/LSE over King's in the eyes of so many. I've read some posts about King's law school having some financial issues. Is this really affecting the institution and the quality of its degree?

    (Of course I realize it is possible and only natural for people on TSR make posts based on what college they attend and not based on hard fact, and hence these posts would contain biases towards their own college)

    Also, not being in the know about such things and not having the opportunity to talk to people who are, would employers look at a King's graduate with prejudice compared to/consider one inferior to a UCL/LSE graduate? (assuming both get equal honors)

    Finally, I know LSE is pretty much standalone, but is the so-called 'rivalry' between KCL and UCL all that it is hyped up to be? (it even has its own section in wikipedia) Is there actual bad blood between students from both schools or is this just something that students laugh about together while meeting up for a pint or two (can they actually be friends?)

    I hope I could get responses with good folks out there with experience about these matters. Thanks for answering my queries in advance (:
    For most of their respective histories KCL and UCL have been seen as on a par; one C of E and establishment, the other non-conformist, atheist and iconoclastic.

    In recent years, but well within the working lives of people who are employers, UCL has pulled ahead. King's has had one or two funding problems and its science departments in particular have had weaknesses.

    In the same period LSE has had a major makeover. If you watch Yes, Minister made about 30 years ago, the fact that Hacker went to LSE rather than a proper university is one of the running gags. At that time the stereotypical image of an LSE student was a Marxist, a trainee African dictator (some things never change-but to use Yes Minister as social comment again one entire plot line centred on Hacker being at the LSE with such a dictator) or both. The idea of LSE as a City financial services training ground has grown up within the last 30 years and probably within the last 15 years.

    LSE reputation in law is a bit misleading but these things tend to become self-fulfilling. LSE has a very high research reputation based largely on international law. That in turn derives from it being the UK institution with probably the strongest overseas connections. The treatment and teaching of undergraduates is, in law as in other subjects perceived to be more neglectful than elsewhere; large lecture theatres, lots of PhD student teaching, minimal individual tuition. However because of its reputation it has been attracting many very good students. Therefore whether it deserved its status when it first acquired it, it is now earning it.

    LSE is however more vulnerable than UCL and KCL to changes in academic fashion. I don't know, but I suspect, that the career path of many LSE law graduates is different from that of law graduates of UCL and King's. If the metrics on which ranking lists are based were changed, LSE might plummet in a way that UCL and King's wouldn't.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Although UCL, King's and LSE are equally good for Law, people have been saying UCL, and LSE have very good Law lecturers. I'm pretty sure King's is good for Law too. However, the only difference is that when giving conditional offers to applicants, King's are quite stingy, and expect a lot from students. Considering they've dropped their standards as opposed to what they were like before, I really believe they should stand more lenient.

    I've also heard King's are favorable towards International students just so they get more banknotes to better the university. Nevertheless, UCL, LSE, and even Imperial treat all their applicants equally. I think that's why King's has dropped down in the rankings, but i also believe they won't change their ways of accepting applicants.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    I sincerely doubt that any financial issues with KCL's Law School will have an effect on undergraduates.
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Cast.Iron)
    I sincerely doubt that any financial issues with KCL's Law School will have an effect on undergraduates.
    These are high level funding issues impacting on the college as a whole. I am not suggesting either that they are specific to the Law School or that they would be noticeable by undergraduates. What I am suggesting is that financial issues may in part explain King's college-wide under-performance in recent years relative to UCL.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Cast.Iron)
    I sincerely doubt that any financial issues with KCL's Law School will have an effect on undergraduates.
    I for one only heard about 'financial issues' of the law school from this website, started by a troll poster that invented the rumour.
    The university made numerous cuts in the past, but none of these affected the law school; for christ's sake, the law school is moving into the East wing of Somerset House either this September or next.

    I don't know how to respond to the OP - I go to King's law school and love it; the staff are fantastic and experts in their fields. They're so approachable, the law programme is very structured and organised, but they do expect a lot out of you.

    I don't know what one poster was talking about when saying King's dropped their entry standards - did they? As far as I know they raised them...!

    Anyway, I love it, would definitely recommend it if you can get a place; competition seems quite intense even though they take 400 undergrads every year - at least half of them are EU/internationals, if not more, but I don't see anything wrong with that - I love how international the course is, you meet incredibly diverse people.

    Any questions, email me

    L
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    In the same period LSE has had a major makeover. If you watch Yes, Minister made about 30 years ago, the fact that Hacker went to LSE rather than a proper university is one of the running gags. At that time the stereotypical image of an LSE student was a Marxist, a trainee African dictator (some things never change-but to use Yes Minister as social comment again one entire plot line centred on Hacker being at the LSE with such a dictator) or both. The idea of LSE as a City financial services training ground has grown up within the last 30 years and probably within the last 15 years.
    Brilliant episode.

    I didn't go to LSE for my first degree in part because of its reputation for treating undergrads as money-earners without paying a lot of mind to them. (In contrast, my supervisors here are all practitioners or fellows--none of them are postgrad students.)
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: March 24, 2011
Poll
Are you going to a festival?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.