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    Do medical schools deem going abroad to do work experience (not on a scheme like gap medics) a worthwhile thing to do compared to staying at home and getting work experience in a hospital or something during a gap year?
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    (Original post by arunadindane)
    Do medical schools deem going abroad to do work experience (not on a scheme like gap medics) a worthwhile thing to do compared to staying at home and getting work experience in a hospital or something during a gap year?
    IMO, given the choice of the two, I'd prefer to see a candidate have 'home' work experience rather than 'abroad' work experience, but I have absolutely no idea about how admission tutor's minds work on this. Getting some long-term work experience/voluntary work is much more useful than blowing a few thousand pounds on a couple of weeks work in another country.
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    Any sort of work experience be it at home or abroad is worthwhile if you can reflect on it well in your personal statement and then subsequently at interview if asked about. So for example what did it teach you about patient communication, working as part of a team, the life and career of a doctor, how did strengthen your desire to become a doctor and what did you learn from your experiences etc. So by all means if you've got the opportunity to go abroad go for it but make sure you learn from it and then most importantly are able to talk about it in a constructive manner at interview in a way that will impress the selectors.
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    So when you write about gap year plans you can simply say that you are continuing with your long term experience if you have already started it? As opposed to something more elaborate?
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    (Original post by Beska)
    IMO, given the choice of the two, I'd prefer to see a candidate have 'home' work experience rather than 'abroad' work experience, but I have absolutely no idea about how admission tutor's minds work on this. Getting some long-term work experience/voluntary work is much more useful than blowing a few thousand pounds on a couple of weeks work in another country.
    The vast majority will have done their work experience at home and also bear in mind that not everyone will have the time or even the money/resources to go abroad for work experience. So fact a candidate did X amount of work in Country Y wouldn't be seen as far more impressive than say somebody who did 2 months shadowing in the Paeds ward or year long volunteering at a children's hospice.

    What the selectors would be keen to gauge is what you got out of that placement and how it strengthened your desire to study Medicine and become a doctor. It's what you get out of it that matters the most, not where you did it, how long etc. But obviously 1 day experience in a GP surgery is certainly not long enough to make an informed decision and some level of commitment would be expected e.g. regular volunteering in an inner-city sporting project etc.
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    (Original post by arunadindane)
    So when you write about gap year plans you can simply say that you are continuing with your long term experience if you have already started it? As opposed to something more elaborate?
    Yup, that's all I did. Tacked on "...and I will continue this during my gap year to gain a further appreciation of...." or something equally appropriate.
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    (Original post by arunadindane)
    So when you write about gap year plans you can simply say that you are continuing with your long term experience if you have already started it? As opposed to something more elaborate?
    Saying that you're continuing with something is good as it shows you have a keen interest and commitment in that said project. If talking about future plans obviously give a brief outline of what it is you might be doing e.g. working in an orphanage in Senegal, and then say what you hope to get out of this, and how this will make you a good clinician in the future and an ideal candidate for an offer at your prospective medical schools.

    You need to show that you know what it takes to become a good doctor and succeed in the medical profession. Remember to try and link all aspects of your personal statement to reasons why they would make you a good doctor.

    For example:

    - Captain of the Rugby team (good teamwork, leadership skills)
    - Grade 8 saxaphone (you can balance work with activities and excel at them)
    - Regular voluntary work at a hospice (ongoing commitment to a project)

    etc.

    You get my point, it has to all link in with why you would make a good doctor and why the universities should give you an interview/offer over other candidates.

    Doing lots of work experience/activities either home or abroad won't do any harm to your application as long as you can reflect on them. Reflection is the key word. We have to do this constantly through medical school (well at Peninsula anyways) through portfolio analysis, clinical logbook entries etc.

    You might want to google search for the "Tomorrow's Doctors" and "Good Medical Practice" GMC documents as these will show you what exactly is expected of trainee doctors and subsequent practising clinicians.
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    Given that the point of work experience is that you gain an understanding of what being a junior doctor is like, I would think experience in the UK would be better if you're hoping to enter a UK medical school.
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    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    Given that the point of work experience is that you gain an understanding of what being a junior doctor is like, I would think experience in the UK would be better if you're hoping to enter a UK medical school.
    Well the qualities and skills needed to be a good clinician can pretty much be applied in any situation be it here in the UK or the States. Obviously if you want to practise in the UK or study here it wouldn't be a bad idea to be familiar with the training structure in the UK for example I was asked about if I knew how long it would take to qualify as a consultant post-graduation or a GP etc.

    I did work experience home and abroad and doing stuff abroad did me no harm obviously. Also don't forget you'll have international students applying too who for obvious reasons will have done little if any work experience in the UK so I don't think their lack of British medical experience would hinder them in any way.

    Also I spent most of my work experiences shadowing consultants and GPs so I gained more of an understanding of what life as a consultant/GP was like rather than a junior doctor. :cool:
 
 
 
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