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    (Original post by RollerBall)
    I started reading this book about two weeks ago after I'd heard all the englishfags rant and rave about it for the past many years. I got recommended it again by a flatmate and he gave me his copy to read.

    I just cannot understand the hype behind this novel. It's so dull and tiresome to read. It seemed to take the first 120 pages to set the scene and only got mildly interesting at around 150. I powered through it as I refuse to pass judgement on a half-read book but found myself falling asleep. I actually did fall asleep twice while reading it on the train home but that may have been from sleep deprivation.

    Inevitably, I ended up skimming over the section on "the book" as the endless blocks of uninteresting/unimaginative descriptive text made me want to kill myself.

    The torture section was mildly entertaining but drawn out and predictable. The actual ending seemed rushed and unfulfilling. Out of the 310 odd pages I think I found about 50 of them interesting.

    It was a chore to read, completely predictable and a wholly unsatisfying experience. I don't want to come across as an uncultured pillock, but seriously, why so much love?
    Sigh... I wasn't too keen on it either. I also didn't like A Clockwork Orange very much either. Different book/author I know, but when I tell people they look at me as if I hurt a small kitten. Or like I'm a simpleton. Great concepts and ideologies, but as a piece of entertainment or reading, not my thing. I didn't enjoy it.

    edit: I quite like Brave New World, though, by Aldous Huxley. Not in the same vein... but that was a way more interesting vision of the future to read about.
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    It's definitely nowhere near one of my favourite books but I thought some of the ideas are very clever (ie editing all newspapers and books) especially when you consider how long ago it was written.

    What really annoyed me though was the way he used the word "literally" like how teenagers use it today: "I literally died!!" etc. He used it 2/3 times. (I sound pathetic :ashamed:)
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    (Original post by Cactus_Man)
    Admittedly, I overreacted, but it's genuinely upsetting to see the book referred to as "propaganda," or to see somebody compare it to The Wire. 1984 is not a passing pop culture phenomenon; it's a timeless exposé on so many factors, both psychological and physical, that I can't even begin to try to explain it without ending up with a rambling, incoherent mess on my hands. (Of course, with time, I could write an essay, but that's another scenario entirely.) It's just brilliant. As I see it, that's not even opinion. It's borderline factual. But as I said earlier, I am emotionally invested in the material to an exceptional degree.
    The Wire is not a passing pop culture phenomenon.
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    (Original post by Bubbles*de*Milo)
    Explain? :curious:
    Well it could be described as anti-communist in the sense Orwell usually used the word "Communist" (Stalinist, Soviet supporters). And it isn't strictly trotskyite but easy enough to interpret that way, I was being glib. It is far easier to construe as anarchist though, but really it's just an attack on the totalitarian ideologies of the mid-20th century. i just jumped on your post because I'm sick of the right dishonesty hijacking Orwell and his work as anti-socialist, it's semi-excusable with 1984, but I've even heard idiots interpret Animal Farm that way, and it's ridiculous for someone who is familiar with his other work.
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    (Original post by Democracy)
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    (Original post by Gwalchgwyn)
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    (Original post by Cactus_Man)
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    (Original post by tite23)
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    Brilliantly put. On a related note, have you guys read any other dystopian (or utopian) novels? Interested in hearing which ones you liked, I've delved into a few in the genre but none have come close to 1984. However, each novel has presented its own share of brilliant insight into social control and other concepts found in the genre.
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    I thought it was pretty thought-provoking myself.
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    Read up on what life in Eastern Europe was like before the 1989 revolutions and you can see how accurate some of the things Orwell described actually is. It's scary that what he's written about has happened, although in a much milder way.

    Granted, I can appreciate the fact that everyone going on about it made you expect something amazing. Either way, it's not for everyone and there are a few popular books that I can't personally stand.
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    Would you prefer 1985?
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    Meh. I sort of understand what you mean; the book is fantastic in terms of ideas and really leaves you thinking. Oddly, some of my favourite parts of the novel was when Winston was reading "the book" purely because it was so thought provoking. It almost wasn't a novel at that point in time, but had changed into something else.

    But I agree, not the best book I've ever read and, IMO, in terms of the way it's written, there's nothing really going for it. Content good. Form? Meh. Not so much. Again, this is all subjective because that's just the type of reader I am. For example, I much enjoyed Brave New World than 1984 as a dystopian novel. Quite a lot of that enjoyment stems from the stylistic form of the former novel.

    :3
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    i found this... but this was because i couldnt get into it. just watch the film instead (Y)
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    Erm....you don't have to like the book. But liking something is different from thinking it good/it being good. Using an inane (I'm sleep deprived due to A-Level stress) analogy, I hate Man United, but appreciate that they're good.

    If you don't like it, that's fair enough. But referring to people who like it as "englishfags" makes you sound ignorant, and even suggests you're just saying this to be controversial.

    To be honest, it also seems like you've completely ignored the social comment and simply dismissed it as "boring".
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    (Original post by Angela_Beth)
    I love 1984, but it's not like you have to enjoy every single book you're recommended, OP.

    I'm an English Lit student, and I love reading, but there have been quite a few classics I just hated. Wuthering Heights is a prime example. And Gulliver's Travels. Ugh.
    Agreed; I detested Sense and Sensibility-perhaps not on the same level as Wuthering Heights, but my English teacher still looked at me like I was an ignoramus when I said how dull I found it.
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    (Original post by Ape Gone Insane)
    Brilliantly put. On a related note, have you guys read any other dystopian (or utopian) novels? Interested in hearing which ones you liked, I've delved into a few in the genre but none have come close to 1984. However, each novel has presented its own share of brilliant insight into social control and other concepts found in the genre.
    Love dystopian literature!

    My favourites:
    Brave New World - Huxley
    Day of the Triffids - Wyndham
    The Chrysalids - Wyndham
    Midwich Cuckoos - Wyndam
    Fahrenheit 451 - Bradbury
    Handmaid's tale - Atwood
    A clockwork Orange- Burgess

    Seriously how can anyone not enjoy 1984. Just think it the ultimate evolution of Newspeak there will no longer be a concept of freedom so how on earth are you going to rebel.

    Ingsoc doubleplusgood.


    (Original post by PendulumBoB)
    Would you prefer 1985?
    1985 that little known right wing riposte to 1984. Its actually pretty decent in foreseeing the rise of Islam as threat to the West but completely wrong about unions.
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    (Original post by Dijobla)
    edit: I quite like Brave New World, though, by Aldous Huxley. Not in the same vein... but that was a way more interesting vision of the future to read about.
    It's also more accordant with our current reality, a society controlled through pleasure, rather than fear, where instead of being deprived of things we are reduced to hedonistic nihilism.
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    So, you didn't enjoy 1984?
    That's cool, we're all entitled to our opinions.

    And as luck would have it - We have a secure facility in Guantanamo just for people like you!
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    i know what you mean
    i skipped past the 'book' part as well
    overall i liked it though
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    I decided not to, for the sake of my sanity
    What do you study?
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    For me OP I have yet to read 1984
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    not everyone likes the same thing, i thought it was a really good book, but if you don't like it thats fine, it's not obligitory
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    (Original post by PendulumBoB)
    Would you prefer 1985?
    Have you read 1985? I inquired about it at my local bookshop a while ago but they didn't have it
 
 
 

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