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    I'm looking at moving to the US for grad school (as the title suggests) and I'm wondering if anybody has already on this forum.

    Did you have to take the GRE?

    Is it worth it financially? (I know that there are a lot fo schools that accept need-blind applications, so I'm sticking to those)

    I have so many questions, like where the best is to apply, should I go to one that has a big name just so tha it is nationally recognised?

    I want to study History or Journalism and am currently at Durham studying history and french.

    Any ideas or thoughts on my question. I know it's broad but please contribute anything if you can.

    Thank you
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    You shold probably look in the postgrad forum.

    I think most, if not all, US unis require the GRE. You can take it in London - if you google, there's a place in London that has lots of information about US universities & offers the GRE, and they also offer the GRE at varous places around the country.

    Postgrad courses are expensive whereever you take them. There are some quite good funding options in the US, but you'll have to do a lot of looking around.
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    Unfortunately, like Little Jules said, most American universities require GRE; in fact, MIT is the only university I can think of that does not require it. In terms of journalism programmes, Columbia seems the most obvious choice.
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    I did the GRE and did alright (the maths bit aside :rofl: ).

    Worth it financially: I guess that depends on the amount you're talking, the amount of time you'd be out there, etc.

    Have you asked any of your current lecturers about where to apply? That's what I did when I was thinking about postgrad. Was given a list of suitable places in the UK, USA and Canada. I then narrowed them down based on my interests, criteria and which ones were fully funded
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    (Original post by ellie_flower)
    I'm looking at moving to the US for grad school (as the title suggests) and I'm wondering if anybody has already on this forum.

    Did you have to take the GRE?

    Is it worth it financially? (I know that there are a lot fo schools that accept need-blind applications, so I'm sticking to those)

    I have so many questions, like where the best is to apply, should I go to one that has a big name just so tha it is nationally recognised?

    I want to study History or Journalism and am currently at Durham studying history and french.

    Any ideas or thoughts on my question. I know it's broad but please contribute anything if you can.

    Thank you
    x
    For whatever hasn't been answered already, fire away... heading off this August.
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    There are some programs within different schools that don't require the GRE (like Studio Art) but History and Journalism will require the GRE just about everywhere. It's not too hard - not much harder than the SAT - just take a couple practice tests to familiarize yourself with the style of the test.
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    (Original post by ellie_flower)
    I'm looking at moving to the US for grad school (as the title suggests) and I'm wondering if anybody has already on this forum.

    Did you have to take the GRE?

    Is it worth it financially? (I know that there are a lot fo schools that accept need-blind applications, so I'm sticking to those)

    I have so many questions, like where the best is to apply, should I go to one that has a big name just so tha it is nationally recognised?

    I want to study History or Journalism and am currently at Durham studying history and french.

    Any ideas or thoughts on my question. I know it's broad but please contribute anything if you can.

    Thank you
    x
    As a general rule, yes you'll need to take the GRE. Each university weighs it differently in the admissions process, however.

    Keep in mind that after you gain acceptance you'll also need to prove to the U.S. government you can finance your studies, etc. to get a visa. This can be a lengthy process and it's best to start as soon as you're accepted.

    When do you plan to start? While many application deadlines for Fall 2011 have passed that doesn't mean that a particular university won't consider you as late as May or June. But you also need to take into consideration the amount of time a student visa takes to process.

    As both a journalism and history major I concur that Columbia is one of the best. It will also be one of the most expensive not only in terms in tuition but also when you factor in the cost of living in New York. The University of Missouri and the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill (both public universities) have some of the best journalism programs in the country. Other good journalism programs can be found at Northwestern (Chicago, IL; private) and the University of California-Berkley (San Francisco Bay Area; public). Public universities may or may not be cheaper than private ones.

    I guess this begs the question: what kind of journalism do you want to study? Because there will be differences between broadcast, online and print (the last being a dying breed).

    And the same goes for history. What type of history interests you? Because that is a fundamental question you need to answer while applying. I could recommend the history departments at the top public and private universities (including the Ivy Leagues, UCLA, NYU, Stanford, Georgetown, Notre Dame, University of Texas-Austin, University of Wisconsin-Madison, etc) but it really comes down to what you want to study and then decide where.

    Other things to consider: what part of the country you want to live in as climates can vary, what type of living arrangements you want (on-campus, off-campus), your transportation needs (i.e. if you live off-campus will you need a car to commute back and forth?), if you want a big city or a small "college town", etc.

    Let me know if you need any more help! Don't hesitate to ask... and hope you make it to this side of the pond soon. Good luck!
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    I am interested in this topic too. So I had created a thread few days back.

    Here's the link - http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...php?p=30494248

    We can choose that thread or this thread to continue on this topic. But just let me know.
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    Try these websites:

    www.thegradcafe.com

    and

    www.collegeconfidential.com

    They're very useful
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    Thanks ever so much for your replies. It's really interesting to get a sense of where the better public universities are to apply for, mainly because at my high school it was all harvard princeton yale panic and all the private liberal arts colleges, so it's really refreshing to know that I can consider universities like Wisconsin and Texas.

    Columbia is my dream university as it has the program I want to study more than anything (Slavic Studies which then allows me to specialise in Russian and Hungarian history). I am a little worried about the robustness of a journalism course. I am most interested into entering the field of research in broadcasting, or foreign affairs in online/print. I have practical experience in all so I'm not too worried about not having the right background etc (although I understand how competative it is).

    Is Columbia really really hard to get in to? I am predicted a 2:1 in my degree and I'm wondering whether I should just stop dreaming and head somewhere else. Does anybody know if this would rule out Stanford, Berekly and Northwestern as well? I have a mountain of societies and things I belong to.

    Apologies for the personal nature of this question Olympus, there were just a few things I wanted to iron out.

    I posted a simialr trhead in another forum, so apologies if anybody has already answered that. All the information is great, thanks.
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    (Original post by ellie_flower)
    […] Columbia is my dream university as it has the program I want to study more than anything (Slavic Studies which then allows me to specialise in Russian and Hungarian history). I am a little worried about the robustness of a journalism course. I am most interested into entering the field of research in broadcasting, or foreign affairs in online/print. I have practical experience in all so I'm not too worried about not having the right background etc (although I understand how competative it is).

    Is Columbia really really hard to get in to? I am predicted a 2:1 in my degree and I'm wondering whether I should just stop dreaming and head somewhere else. Does anybody know if this would rule out Stanford, Berekly and Northwestern as well? I have a mountain of societies and things I belong to. […]
    While my interests are in Russian literature not history, if you are interested in 'Slavic Studies' Harvard and Princeton stand out, but Columbia and Stanford are strong too; again, at least from a literature perspective. Off the top of my head, you might also want to consider Berkeley, Darmouth College, Middlebury College and the University of Southern California. I do not know anything about Northwestern as a university, but it is a good publisher in the area.

    Having said all that, while all of the above are good universities there is little reason – unless your research interests are that specific – to leave the UK. The UK excels in this area; in fact, UCL's School of Slavonic and Eastern Europe Studies (SSEES) is probably the best in the world. But there are lots of other strong departments that you could consider too.
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    As others have already said, the GRE is pretty much a requirement. That is one reason why I feel fortunate I'm leaving the US and studying in the UK. I would advise you take it very soon since they are changing the format, and from what I've been told, it will be more difficult. Good luck!

    I think it's important to search which universities have strong journalism and history programs. I was completely lost when I first starting looking at universities in the UK for creative writing, but I was able with online research (and this forum website) to narrow down my pick to the five top places with excellent programs. If you can make any sort of contacts with professors and/or advisors at a university you're interested in, that will also (for obvious reasons) help you greatly in your endeavor.
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    As a student who went from High School in London, to attending a state university in the US as an undergraduate, make sure you have thought out all of the costs. I am now in £60,000 worth of debt and have had a rather mediocre experience at the most expensive state university in the country, The University of New Hampshire.

    Costs for postgraudate degrees at the universities you've mentioned are pretty high, unless you are able to qualify for some sort of scholarship ahead of time. (They have a history of not giving good financial aid to us liberal artsy types - if you were an engineering student, you'd be fine). Having done what I did, for undergraduate, I made sure to only look at PG degrees in the UK. If you can do History at UCL (School of Slavonic and Eastern European Studies) for example for only £9000 and get it done in only 10 months effectively, you'd have saved a ton of money and a year and a bit of your life. If you want to do postgrad in the US, wait for PhD and make them pay for you to attend.
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    Thanks, this is what I have been considering. Both myself and my partner had spied the perfect course at UCL (slavic studies for me and aerospace for him). To be honest, I've just been getting cabin fever. i went to an international school, all my friends are studying in the US and I want a more healthy, outdoors lifestyle that is really quite difficlt to achieve in the middle of a cold country in London. And before anybody says anything like, just go to the countryside, I prefer the pace of life there on the West coast. Most of my friends as I said are now living in America so it would be a real lifestyle change, not just for the university.

    I suppose moving to grad school out there was an excuse to have a reason to go to the US, despite its lack of financial feasability. I'm worried about not finding a job out there, so being unable to get the proper visa etc.

    I'm really not sure what to do now. Doubt has been cast!
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    (Original post by ellie_flower)
    Thanks, this is what I have been considering. Both myself and my partner had spied the perfect course at UCL (slavic studies for me and aerospace for him). To be honest, I've just been getting cabin fever. i went to an international school, all my friends are studying in the US and I want a more healthy, outdoors lifestyle that is really quite difficlt to achieve in the middle of a cold country in London. And before anybody says anything like, just go to the countryside, I prefer the pace of life there on the West coast. Most of my friends as I said are now living in America so it would be a real lifestyle change, not just for the university.

    I suppose moving to grad school out there was an excuse to have a reason to go to the US, despite its lack of financial feasability. I'm worried about not finding a job out there, so being unable to get the proper visa etc. […]
    Do a(nother) masters at SSEES and then a PhD at an American university. This will be the most cost-effective solution, and will also give you the most time in the US, assuming you secure a funded place, that is.
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    Are you a US citizen also? Need-blind admissions is usually for American students and often not for international students. As far as I know, that level of financial aid is only offered to international students at a handful of schools. MIT, Harvard, Princeton, Yale, Dartmouth and Amherst.

    And if you're complaining about cabin fever, bad weather, and pace of life - you'll find that all of the above schools don't offer much in that respect. New England is frigid cold, I spent most of this winter walking to work in -18C and a foot of snow, the Boston and NYC metro areas are very fast paced and probably some of the most similar lifestyles to that of London, and if you aren't in Boston or Manhattan, you'll realize that there isn't a great deal to do. This is especially true in Princeton, Dartmouth and Amherst where you are situated in the middle of the forest with the nearest city at least 2 hours away.

    I don't mean to be a real downer on this, but I had the same feeling when moving over to the US for UG. I wanted a fresh start and experience something new - but try not to over-hype it in your head, life is remarkably similar. The West Coast on the other hand is a different story though...

    If you prove yourself in an MA (and want to go further), US schools would love to have (and pay for) a British student for a PhD program.
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    (Original post by topolino)
    As a general rule, yes you'll need to take the GRE. Each university weighs it differently in the admissions process, however.

    Keep in mind that after you gain acceptance you'll also need to prove to the U.S. government you can finance your studies, etc. to get a visa. This can be a lengthy process and it's best to start as soon as you're accepted.

    When do you plan to start? While many application deadlines for Fall 2011 have passed that doesn't mean that a particular university won't consider you as late as May or June. But you also need to take into consideration the amount of time a student visa takes to process.

    As both a journalism and history major I concur that Columbia is one of the best. It will also be one of the most expensive not only in terms in tuition but also when you factor in the cost of living in New York. The University of Missouri and the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill (both public universities) have some of the best journalism programs in the country. Other good journalism programs can be found at Northwestern (Chicago, IL; private) and the University of California-Berkley (San Francisco Bay Area; public). Public universities may or may not be cheaper than private ones.

    I guess this begs the question: what kind of journalism do you want to study? Because there will be differences between broadcast, online and print (the last being a dying breed).

    And the same goes for history. What type of history interests you? Because that is a fundamental question you need to answer while applying. I could recommend the history departments at the top public and private universities (including the Ivy Leagues, UCLA, NYU, Stanford, Georgetown, Notre Dame, University of Texas-Austin, University of Wisconsin-Madison, etc) but it really comes down to what you want to study and then decide where.

    Other things to consider: what part of the country you want to live in as climates can vary, what type of living arrangements you want (on-campus, off-campus), your transportation needs (i.e. if you live off-campus will you need a car to commute back and forth?), if you want a big city or a small "college town", etc.

    Let me know if you need any more help! Don't hesitate to ask... and hope you make it to this side of the pond soon. Good luck!

    May I ask why somebody gave me negative feedback? Did I say something wrong?!?
 
 
 

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