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Driving test tommorow last minute advice :s watch

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    Lol. Negging me without replying. Very classy. You know I'm right.
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    (Original post by TomU)
    Lol. Negging me without replying. Very classy. You know I'm right.
    I negged you.
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    (Original post by Arcanine)
    I negged you.
    Meh, I honestly couldn't give a flying fook about the neg rep. I'm mature enough to want to engage in an intelligent conversation. It really speaks volumes about people when they leave neg rep for people without actually contributing to the discussion.
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    I was very lucky. My test (which I passed over 20 years ago,) was very lenient! No hill starts, no parallel parking, no reversing round corners and no theory test!! Just 3 questions at the end of the test on the Highway Code. I guess the examiner was either running late or I was just very lucky! The test was only for 15 minutes, and most of them, even back then were for half an hour. Still, in the 20 years I have been driving, I think my record is rather good. Only 1 accident in that time and it was only minor. Going back to the Zebra Crossing issues which seems to be heavily debated here, I always slow down before I get to the crossing (especially for lollipop people too,) cause you never know what might happen. It's better to be safe than sorry. I also recommend that when you do eventually pass your test, go out with an "experienced" driver the first few times (not one of your mates, I went out with my dad who had over 30 years of driving behind him.) I did and it really helped improve my driving.
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    My advice to you is this.... suck my c.l.i.t.
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    (Original post by TomU)
    You're talking absolute nonsense. There is absolutely no need to slow down at a zebra crossing if it is clear that there is nobody nearby who may be looking to use it. What you're suggesting will only make people pick up faults on their test and irritate drivers behind them when driving solo. It also does nothing to help protect pedestrians, providing sensible judgment is used dependant on the situation.

    Of course there should be appropriate caution used if there are people around it, especially children, that goes without saying. You are failing, however, (at least in your argument here) to realise that each individual situation on the roads is different, and while some zebra crossings will have perfect unobstructed views of the pedestrian paths around it, others may have visual obstructions.

    You must use good judgment in deciding whether it is necessary to slow down for potential hazards; suggesting that it is necessary to slow down for every zebra crossing is as incorrect as suggesting you should stop at every roundabout to ensure that no traffic is coming. It is all about anticipation and judgment.


    Not surprised someone neg repped you for spouting this pile of rubbish. Your problem is with my suggestion that you should slow down a couple of mph when approaching a zebra crossing and be sure to look both ways. No-one said anything about some imaginary (ie non-existant) zebra crossing in the middle of a field in which you can see for miles around that there is no-one approaching. The vast majority of zebra crossings are in busy, built up areas, surrounded by parked cars and hidden entrances that a little kid could easily run out of. Is it really so much to ask that you ease off just 2mph to make sure you get a good look at whether there is a little kid behind that car about to run out over the crossing? Perhaps, to you it is. I don't really care if you go to jail for reckless driving after smearing a toddler across your bumper, but please don't give such godawful advice to other young drivers.
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    (Original post by RiskyRix)
    hey guys got my 3rd test tommorow, basically this is what happened 1st test i failed because a lady walked out into the road on a zebra crossing and i saw her in good time and was about to stop but before i had a chance the examiner slammed the brakes on and was complaining why didnt you stop are you blind! This i feel was unfair and he should have given me a chance to react. 1st test i got 2 serious and 9 minors.

    2nd test was completelt different i was near the end of my test literally 5 mins away from the test centre when the examiner tells me we might do a third roundabout since we are early. so i approach roundabout signal correclty but i get into the wrong lane being in a panic since it was so busy that day. I was ment to go 2nd exit on the roundabout and i should have stayed in the left hand lane but being confused i signal right and go into the middle lane resulting in a failure again even though i didnt cause any harm to the other drivers when i later signaled left and came over and left at the 2nd exit.

    Anyway thats all in the past. i started driving again 2 months ago had about 16 hours of practise since then and feel much more comfortable driving around and doing maneuvers. i did a mock test on monday and passed with 13 minors the other mock tests i done the last two times i failed really bad something like 10 minors 4 serious. So this had boosted my confidence a bit compared to last time.

    my last test was back in july 2010 when independant driving was not introduced so this is all new to me. should i be worried about this? can they fail you if you go the wrong way? Im guessing not as long as i dont do anythin stupid. I have been watching a series of videos on youtube aswell as reading the high way code to help me.


    Thanks guys and wish me luck!
    Hahha I had to stop reading there.

    That's like someone my girlfriend knows trying to claim he's 'too good' at driving so he found the lessons boring and that's why he stopped. Suuuure.
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    (Original post by insoms)
    Hahha I had to stop reading there.

    That's like someone my girlfriend knows trying to claim he's 'too good' at driving so he found the lessons boring and that's why he stopped. Suuuure.
    To be fair, you can hardly blame the poor guy for being confused.

    When at least four idiots on this thread have recommended to him that he need not slow down even slightly when approaching zebra crossings, its hardly surprising an old woman almost got killed.
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    (Original post by py0alb)
    Not surprised someone neg repped you for spouting this pile of rubbish. Your problem is with my suggestion that you should slow down a couple of mph when approaching a zebra crossing and be sure to look both ways. No-one said anything about some imaginary (ie non-existant) zebra crossing in the middle of a field in which you can see for miles around that there is no-one approaching. The vast majority of zebra crossings are in busy, built up areas, surrounded by parked cars and hidden entrances that a little kid could easily run out of. Is it really so much to ask that you ease off just 2mph to make sure you get a good look at whether there is a little kid behind that car about to run out over the crossing? Perhaps, to you it is. I don't really care if you go to jail for reckless driving after smearing a toddler across your bumper, but please don't give such godawful advice to other young drivers.
    Some little kid could run out at any time in a built up area. You should be driving carefully and be able to stop at a moments notice at all times in built up areas, not just specifically at zebra crossings. That's my point. There's no point crusing along with no regard for potential hazards and only slowing down a couple of mph at zebra crossings. I'd hazard that most toddlers don't know how to use a zebra crossing and if they're going to run out anywhere, it'll likely be where their house is, not at the nearest crossing!

    I have no idea what your driving is like, but I have an absolutely clean 8+ year record, no accidents, no points, nothing. I drive sensibly all the time, not just when the zebra crossing is approaching.

    I seriously doubt that my attitude of "drive safely at all times, not just at zebra crossings" is going to result in me "smearing a toddler across my bumper", and I consider that to be a pretty lame personal attack - one you've now used against two separate people on this same thread. Grow up and stop being so melodramatic.
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    My advice? Enjoy yourself. It'll be banter.
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    (Original post by TomU)
    Some little kid could run out at any time in a built up area. You should be driving carefully and be able to stop at a moments notice at all times in built up areas, not just specifically at zebra crossings. That's my point. There's no point crusing along with no regard for potential hazards and only slowing down a couple of mph at zebra crossings. I'd hazard that most toddlers don't know how to use a zebra crossing and if they're going to run out anywhere, it'll likely be where their house is, not at the nearest crossing!

    I have no idea what your driving is like, but I have an absolutely clean 8+ year record, no accidents, no points, nothing. I drive sensibly all the time, not just when the zebra crossing is approaching.

    I seriously doubt that my attitude of "drive safely at all times, not just at zebra crossings" is going to result in me "smearing a toddler across my bumper", and I consider that to be a pretty lame personal attack - one you've now used against two separate people on this same thread. Grow up and stop being so melodramatic.
    Really, its irrelevant whether or not you have so far knocked down 10 pensioners or none. The point is that you're giving bad advice. Obviously you should be driving carefully in any built up area - and that includes easing off slightly for any zebra crossing where the risk of someone running out is significantly increased.

    I'm finding it hard to countenance what exactly several self proclaimed "competent drivers" :rolleyes: could have a problem with in this statement. Care to enlighten me, or else graciously admit that you and the other muppets were all wrong?
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    (Original post by py0alb)
    Really, its irrelevant whether or not you have so far knocked down 10 pensioners or none. The point is that you're giving bad advice. Obviously you should be driving carefully in any built up area - and that includes easing off slightly for any zebra crossing where the risk of someone running out is significantly increased.

    I'm finding it hard to countenance what exactly several self proclaimed "competent drivers" :rolleyes: could have a problem with in this statement. Care to enlighten me, or else graciously admit that you and the other muppets were all wrong?
    I disagree that my advice is bad.

    Your advice is simply un-necessary. If you're driving carefully enough in a built up area, there should be absolutely no need to slow down for a crossing as you should already be anticpating any potential hazards and be ready to stop at a moments notice anyway.

    Have you ever considered that if there are more "experienced" people giving the same advice, then you might actually be the one who is wrong? I also believe that my driving experience is relevant, especially considering that for the past 3-4 years I've been driving for a living as well and have done a hell of a lot of miles! Just for the fun of it, I'd be interested to hear exactly how much driving experience you have!

    As I, and the other "experienced drivers" have said on this thread. Drive carefully all the time. Drive for the situation. Of course, if it's a weekday and you're in a built up area near a school you should be extra aware, especially around crossings! That goes without saying. What I am saying is that it is simply unnecessary to slow down at every zebra crossing you approach, irrespective of time of day, driving conditions, visibility, other traffic and pedestrians.
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    (Original post by TomU)
    I disagree that my advice is bad.

    Your advice is simply un-necessary. If you're driving carefully enough in a built up area, there should be absolutely no need to slow down for a crossing as you should already be anticpating any potential hazards and be ready to stop at a moments notice anyway.

    Have you ever considered that if there are more "experienced" people giving the same advice, then you might actually be the one who is wrong? I also believe that my driving experience is relevant, especially considering that for the past 3-4 years I've been driving for a living as well and have done a hell of a lot of miles! Just for the fun of it, I'd be interested to hear exactly how much driving experience you have!
    As I, and the other "experienced drivers" have said on this thread. Drive carefully all the time. Drive for the situation. Of course, if it's a weekday and you're in a built up area near a school you should be extra aware, especially around crossings! That goes without saying. What I am saying is that it is simply unnecessary to slow down at every zebra crossing you approach, irrespective of time of day, driving conditions, visibility, other traffic and pedestrians.
    Since passing my test at first attempt aged 17, I've now been driving for 12 years, and am fortunate enough to be able to say that I've never had an accident (that was my fault).

    So I think you'll find that I'm the "experienced driver on the thread." Does it really make a difference? Do you believe I know what I'm talking about now whereas you wouldn't if I said I had been driving for 2 years?
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    in my experience it was my dad who shouted and paniced and my instructor who didn't!
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    (Original post by py0alb)
    Since passing my test at first attempt aged 17, I've now been driving for 12 years, and am fortunate enough to be able to say that I've never had an accident (that was my fault).

    So I think you'll find that I'm the "experienced driver on the thread." Does it really make a difference? Do you believe I know what I'm talking about now whereas you wouldn't if I said I had been driving for 2 years?
    At least people on this thread know how informed your opinion is now. It's one of the problems with internet forums - especially ones designed with students in mind - the majority of people on here are probably aged 16-20 and are not in a position to give advice on a topic like driving.

    Perhaps they've changed the advice given in lessons since you did your driving test. I was explicitly told during my driving lessons that there is no need to slow down for zebra crossings as you should be driving carefully at all times in a built up area - i.e. driving for the conditions. I've followed that advice and have had no problems, nor any close shaves.

    If you're driving in a built up area that may have children around, chances are its going to be a 30mph zone, or perhaps even a 20mph zone anyway. If you're following the speed limit and are aware of the potential for any hazards ahead, there should be absolutely no need to drop to 27/17mph respectively for zebra crossings.

    Slowing down from 30 to 27mph will reduce your stopping distance (on average) by about 8 feet. Whilst I do not argue that this can be the difference between life and death, 8 feet at 27mph will take approximately 0.2 seconds - given the average reaction time of a human is 0.7-0.9s, the saving of 0.2 seconds is statistically insignificant.

    What you really need to do is be completely aware of your surroundings and ready to stop at a moments notice. Reaction time is just as important as speed - someone playing music, talking to a passenger or just generally not being 100% focused on potential hazards will in all likelyhood have a reaction time of over 0.7-0.9 seconds.

    So, this brings me back to my original point. No need to specifically slow down for crossings. Just drive sensibly for the conditions and be ready to stop if a hazard comes out of nowhere.

    Futhermore, it could be argued that as the braking distance is just an average, based on a hypothetical average car, it is more important to keep your car in good condition. It may or may not come as a surprise to you that a lot of people don't keep their cars in roadworthy condition (my brother used to work as a mechanic, so i've seen first-hand how some people bring their cars in for MOTs) - worn brake pads and worn tyres will cost you more stopping distance than 2 or 3 mph will save. That's another lesson that the public doesn't seem to have learnt, but needs to.
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    (Original post by TomU)
    At least people on this thread know how informed your opinion is now. It's one of the problems with internet forums - especially ones designed with students in mind - the majority of people on here are probably aged 16-20 and are not in a position to give advice on a topic like driving.

    Perhaps they've changed the advice given in lessons since you did your driving test. I was explicitly told during my driving lessons that there is no need to slow down for zebra crossings as you should be driving carefully at all times in a built up area - i.e. driving for the conditions. I've followed that advice and have had no problems, nor any close shaves.

    If you're driving in a built up area that may have children around, chances are its going to be a 30mph zone, or perhaps even a 20mph zone anyway. If you're following the speed limit and are aware of the potential for any hazards ahead, there should be absolutely no need to drop to 27/17mph respectively for zebra crossings.

    Slowing down from 30 to 27mph will reduce your stopping distance (on average) by about 8 feet. Whilst I do not argue that this can be the difference between life and death, 8 feet at 27mph will take approximately 0.2 seconds - given the average reaction time of a human is 0.7-0.9s, the saving of 0.2 seconds is statistically insignificant.

    What you really need to do is be completely aware of your surroundings and ready to stop at a moments notice. Reaction time is just as important as speed - someone playing music, talking to a passenger or just generally not being 100% focused on potential hazards will in all likelyhood have a reaction time of over 0.7-0.9 seconds.

    So, this brings me back to my original point. No need to specifically slow down for crossings. Just drive sensibly for the conditions and be ready to stop if a hazard comes out of nowhere.
    I wouldn't describe 8 feet as statistically insignificant. It's the difference between hitting someone or not hitting them. Its also an underestimate, as my reaction time will be drastically decreased by the fact that my foot is already on the brake, whereas your's would be on the accelerator.

    Could easily be the difference between life and death.
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    (Original post by py0alb)
    I wouldn't describe 8 feet as statistically insignificant. It's the difference between hitting someone or not hitting them. Its also an underestimate, as my reaction time will be drastically decreased by the fact that my foot is already on the brake, whereas your's would be on the accelerator.

    Could easily be the difference between life and death.
    Considering that we're talking about the difference of less than 0.2 seconds at 27mph, it is clearly insignificant, as natural human reaction time varies between 0.7 and 0.9 seconds.

    I'm not saying - and have never said - that it is a bad idea to slow down for zebra crossings. Simply that it is unnecessary and I believe the statistics back this up.

    Natural variances such as driving conditions, an individuals reaction time and other circumstances such as the condition of the car are always going to play a bigger part in preventing or causing accidents than slowing down a couple of mph. You're doing the right thing by being aware of potential hazards, but it's simply being over-cautious to have your foot hovering over the brake at every opportunity.
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    (Original post by TomU)
    Considering that we're talking about the difference of less than 0.2 seconds at 27mph, it is clearly insignificant, as natural human reaction time varies between 0.7 and 0.9 seconds.

    I'm not saying - and have never said - that it is a bad idea to slow down for zebra crossings. Simply that it is unnecessary and I believe the statistics back this up.

    Natural variances such as driving conditions, an individuals reaction time and other circumstances such as the condition of the car are always going to play a bigger part in preventing or causing accidents than slowing down a couple of mph. You're doing the right thing by being aware of potential hazards, but it's simply being over-cautious to have your foot hovering over the brake at every opportunity.

    It's not "at every opportunity"; it's at moments of heightened risk, such as a zebra crossings, roundabouts, when there are kids playing by the roadside, or when I suspect a car in front may be about to cut me up or pull out in front of me. I want to be in a position whereby I can brake extremely quickly if required so I start to ease the brake just a smidgen in anticipation. There have been several times over the years where this habit has prevented accidents. It's a good habit to get into, I would fully recommend it. It doesn't make me nervous or hesitant, I drive at the speed limit (sometimes over :gasp:) but it does make me a better, safer driver.
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    (Original post by py0alb)
    It's not "at every opportunity"; it's at moments of heightened risk, such as a zebra crossings, roundabouts, when there are kids playing by the roadside, or when I suspect a car in front may be about to cut me up or pull out in front of me. I want to be in a position whereby I can brake extremely quickly if required so I start to ease the brake just a smidgen in anticipation. There have been several times over the years where this habit has prevented accidents. It's a good habit to get into, I would fully recommend it. It doesn't make me nervous or hesitant, I drive at the speed limit (sometimes over :gasp:) but it does make me a better, safer driver.
    Pressing the brake pedal a smidgen when approaching a hazard is known as comfort braking and is deemed (at least by the instructors at the institute of advanced motoring) to be bad advanced driving and an indication of poor planning and observation. That's what I was told when I did a day course with one of their instructors.

    Good anticipation should eliminate the need to brake at all when approaching a potential hazard.

    Edit: It's actually nice to discuss this now that it's developed into a meaningful discussion, devoid of personal attacks and suggestions of idiots splattering children all over the pavement. We ought to be better than that at the ages of 26 and 29 respectively!
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    (Original post by TomU)
    Pressing the brake pedal a smidgen when approaching a hazard is known as comfort braking and is deemed (at least by the instructors at the institute of advanced motoring) to be bad advanced driving and an indication of poor planning and observation.

    Good anticipation should eliminate the need to brake at all when approaching a potential hazard.
    Actually, slowing down to a more appropriate speed in anticipation of a potentially hazardous situation developing is called defensive driving. Its an indication of excellent anticipation and observation, the very skills that have prevented me having an accident in situations where most people (including yourself by the sounds of it) would have done.

    I think perhaps you have either misunderstood me or you have misunderstood the institute of advanced motoring.
 
 
 
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