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Driving test tommorow last minute advice :s watch

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    Decent list of tips here that helped a bit - http://www.carbuzz.co.uk/blog/post/D...Test-Tips.aspx

    Trying to stay sane just before was my problem, 3rd time lucky though!
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    (Original post by py0alb)
    Actually, slowing down to a more appropriate speed in anticipation of a potentially hazardous situation developing is called defensive driving. Its an indication of excellent anticipation and observation, the very skills that have prevented me having an accident in situations where most people (including yourself by the sounds of it) would have done.

    I think perhaps you have either misunderstood me or you have misunderstood the institute of advanced motoring.
    I don't think that I've misunderstood the IAM, the instructor was quite specific.

    Anyway, I still don't know how you don't understand the concept that every single situation that you will encounter on the road is different. A quick google has located this, directly taken from a driving school's website. This effectively backs up what I've been saying all along:

    Approaching a crossing

    1. Identify the crossing as early as possible
    2. Having identified the crossing, check your mirrors, particularly your centre
    and right mirrors. You may need to slow down so you will need to know how
    close vehicles are behind and what their movements are.
    3. Check the crossing itself and the footpaths either side of it.
    4. Is there anybody on the crossing? Is there anybody walking towards it?

    Are parked cars blocking your view of the footpaths?
    If the answer to the above questions are yes, you may have to slow down or even stop just before the crossing.
    Surely this is common sense? Yes, you *may* need to slow down at the crossing, but you need to take into account all the other factors, such as time of day (is it school time?) and objects that may obstruct your view, such as parked cars or trees.

    There is no need to slow down for every zebra crossing, provided you take into account the above circumstances! Use sound judgment and consistent good driving instead of being over-cautious.
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    Question: If you see a lady step into the road in good time, slow down and be safe, then jokingly say to the examiner "10 points for that one!", what would happen?

    I'm taking my first practical at the beginning of June.
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    (Original post by TomU)
    I don't think that I've misunderstood the IAM, the instructor was quite specific.

    Anyway, I still don't know how you don't understand the concept that every single situation that you will encounter on the road is different. A quick google has located this, directly taken from a driving school's website. This effectively backs up what I've been saying all along:

    Surely this is common sense? Yes, you *may* need to slow down at the crossing, but you need to take into account all the other factors, such as time of day (is it school time?) and objects that may obstruct your view, such as parked cars or trees.

    There is no need to slow down for every zebra crossing, provided you take into account the above circumstances! Use sound judgment and consistent good driving instead of being over-cautious.

    Why are you telling me completely self-evident things, such as the fact that I should "identify whether there is someone on the crossing"? Reaaaally? Tell me more Sherlock. :rolleyes: What on earth leads you to believe that I consider every situation to be the same? I am simply advocating a concept known as defensive driving, something that apparently seems completely foreign to you.


    Defensive driving would teach you that you should be aware of the possibility of someone stepping out from behind an obstruction when approaching a crossing. 99% of the time, the speed you would normally be doing (probably the speed limit) is too fast for you to be able to stop should someone do this at exactly the wrong moment. By the time you can see that the crossing is clear, its too late to stop. However, by slowing down to a more appropriate speed, you will avoid a collision. The amount you need to slow down will obviously depend on the circumstances, any fool can see that. Waiting until someone actually steps out in front of you before applying the brake is pure recklessness.
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    (Original post by py0alb)
    Why are you telling me completely self-evident things, such as the fact that I should "identify whether there is someone on the crossing"? Reaaaally? Tell me more Sherlock. :rolleyes: What on earth leads you to believe that I consider every situation to be the same? I am simply advocating a concept known as defensive driving, something that apparently seems completely foreign to you.


    Defensive driving would teach you that you should be aware of the possibility of someone stepping out from behind an obstruction when approaching a crossing. 99% of the time, the speed you would normally be doing (probably the speed limit) is too fast for you to be able to stop should someone do this at exactly the wrong moment. By the time you can see that the crossing is clear, its too late to stop. However, by slowing down to a more appropriate speed, you will avoid a collision. The amount you need to slow down will obviously depend on the circumstances, any fool can see that. Waiting until someone actually steps out in front of you before applying the brake is pure recklessness.
    Defensive driving: the "everyone else is retarded" method of driving.
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    (Original post by Muffinz)
    Defensive driving: the "everyone else is retarded" method of driving.
    Yes basically thats true. it teaches you to anticipate the worst possible scenario (within reason of course). Obviously you can't spend your entire life driving at 15mph just in case someone steps out in front of you, but in certain high risk situations, such as when there is an visual obstruction on the road, there are kids playing football by the side of the road, or there is a crossing you should ease off in anticipation that you may need to brake.
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    (Original post by RiskyRix)
    hey guys got my 3rd test tommorow, basically this is what happened 1st test i failed because a lady walked out into the road on a zebra crossing and i saw her in good time and was about to stop but before i had a chance the examiner slammed the brakes on and was complaining why didnt you stop are you blind! This i feel was unfair and he should have given me a chance to react. 1st test i got 2 serious and 9 minors.

    2nd test was completelt different i was near the end of my test literally 5 mins away from the test centre when the examiner tells me we might do a third roundabout since we are early. so i approach roundabout signal correclty but i get into the wrong lane being in a panic since it was so busy that day. I was ment to go 2nd exit on the roundabout and i should have stayed in the left hand lane but being confused i signal right and go into the middle lane resulting in a failure again even though i didnt cause any harm to the other drivers when i later signaled left and came over and left at the 2nd exit.

    Anyway thats all in the past. i started driving again 2 months ago had about 16 hours of practise since then and feel much more comfortable driving around and doing maneuvers. i did a mock test on monday and passed with 13 minors the other mock tests i done the last two times i failed really bad something like 10 minors 4 serious. So this had boosted my confidence a bit compared to last time.

    my last test was back in july 2010 when independant driving was not introduced so this is all new to me. should i be worried about this? can they fail you if you go the wrong way? Im guessing not as long as i dont do anythin stupid. I have been watching a series of videos on youtube aswell as reading the high way code to help me.


    Thanks guys and wish me luck!
    Stay calm, don't panic, make sure you signal properly, look in the mirrors, try and go slower around 25/6 so the test takes longer, which means you'll be back in the centre without driving too much, engage the examiner in convo to try and make him miss any mistakes, show midriff, and a tight skirt.
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    (Original post by py0alb)
    Why are you telling me completely self-evident things, such as the fact that I should "identify whether there is someone on the crossing"? Reaaaally? Tell me more Sherlock. :rolleyes: What on earth leads you to believe that I consider every situation to be the same? I am simply advocating a concept known as defensive driving, something that apparently seems completely foreign to you.


    Defensive driving would teach you that you should be aware of the possibility of someone stepping out from behind an obstruction when approaching a crossing. 99% of the time, the speed you would normally be doing (probably the speed limit) is too fast for you to be able to stop should someone do this at exactly the wrong moment. By the time you can see that the crossing is clear, its too late to stop. However, by slowing down to a more appropriate speed, you will avoid a collision. The amount you need to slow down will obviously depend on the circumstances, any fool can see that. Waiting until someone actually steps out in front of you before applying the brake is pure recklessness.
    "identify whether there is someone on the crossing" - I don't see why I should bother reading your posts with any seriousness considering you've quoted me as having said something I have never said!

    And you think I'm the only one stating "completely self-evident things"?! It should not need to be stated that if there is an obstruction blocking your view of the crossing, you should be cautious and slow down in case a child comes running out. Therefore I say back to you, "tell me more, Sherlock." :rolleyes:

    You seem to be insinuating that I never slow down for crossings irrespective of the conditions. Of course I do. It's common bloody sense - something you really ought to have if you've been given a driving license. If I didn't slow down when the circumstances warranted it, you're probably right - I'd have knocked someone down and would be in jail for reckless driving. All I've ever said on this thread is (bolded for emphasis!):

    Drive carefully at all times, especially in residential or built up areas. Take into account the driving conditions and obstructions to your vision at crossings when determining the need (if any) to slow down or come to a stop. If, in your judgment, there is no possibility of a child coming out into the road at a moment's notice, there is no need to slow down at the crossing..

    I think the two of us actually have extremely similar views and we're just misunderstanding each other on here :/ But I must say that you're extremely childish in the way that you respond to other people's posts when you disagree with what they've said. Much more so considering your age.
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    (Original post by TomU)
    "identify whether there is someone on the crossing" - I don't see why I should bother reading your posts with any seriousness considering you've quoted me as having said something I have never said!

    And you think I'm the only one stating "completely self-evident things"?! It should not need to be stated that if there is an obstruction blocking your view of the crossing, you should be cautious and slow down in case a child comes running out. Therefore I say back to you, "tell me more, Sherlock." :rolleyes:

    You seem to be insinuating that I never slow down for crossings irrespective of the conditions. Of course I do. It's common bloody sense - something you really ought to have if you've been given a driving license. If I didn't slow down when the circumstances warranted it, you're probably right - I'd have knocked someone down and would be in jail for reckless driving. All I've ever said on this thread is (bolded for emphasis!):

    Drive carefully at all times, especially in residential or built up areas. Take into account the driving conditions and obstructions to your vision at crossings when determining the need (if any) to slow down or come to a stop. If, in your judgment, there is no possibility of a child coming out into the road at a moment's notice, there is no need to slow down at the crossing..

    I think the two of us actually have extremely similar views and we're just misunderstanding each other on here :/ But I must say that you're extremely childish in the way that you respond to other people's posts when you disagree with what they've said. Much more so considering your age.
    I maintain that it is good practice to slow down from the speed limit when approaching a pedestrian crossing, anywhere between 1mph and 30mph depending on the situation, and be ready to slow down further if required. You say I'm wrong. I disagree. I think I'm right. Feel free to correct yourself and apologise if you have now changed your mind.

    Save the ad hominems please, you'll notice that I haven't got personal. It only serves to highlight that you're aware of the inadequacy of your argument.
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    (Original post by py0alb)
    I maintain that it is good practice to slow down from the speed limit when approaching a pedestrian crossing, anywhere between 1mph and 30mph depending on the situation, and be ready to slow down further if required. You say I'm wrong. I disagree. I think I'm right. Feel free to correct yourself and apologise if you have now changed your mind.

    Save the ad hominems please, you'll notice that I haven't got personal. It only serves to highlight that you're aware of the inadequacy of your argument.
    • you sound like a dangerous maniac
    • I would encourage the police to keep a close eye on you before you plough down any more little kids
    • ...sooner or later someone is gonna get killed. Most likely a little kid. Now that may not bother you
    • at least four idiots on this thread
    • admit that you and the other muppets were all wrong
    Sure, you've not made any attacks against anyone on this thread :rolleyes:. I take criticism of my driving quite personally, considering my exemplary driving record - criticism from random strangers on the internet that have never even seen it even moreso. Therefore, I take your comments personally. I think these little quotes only highlight your immaturity.

    You seem to be implying in the quote above that you slow down a bit for all pedestrian crossings at all times, be it 1mph or to a complete stop. I can't honestly believe that in a hypothetical example where you're driving through a small village (like the one I live in) at 2am that you'll be using your brake pedal in the slightest, just in case someone runs out into the road. What I suspect you do, like many others, is actually drive above the speed limit, as the conditions dictate that the roads are quiet and a chances of hitting a pedestrian are significantly lower.

    I have no need to apologise or admit that I am wrong as I don't believe there is any reason that you can legitimately challenge the bold part of my statement in my last post. It's as simple as that.
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    (Original post by TomU)
    Sure, you've not made any attacks against anyone on this thread :rolleyes:. I take criticism of my driving quite personally, considering my exemplary driving record - criticism from random strangers on the internet that have never even seen it even moreso. Therefore, I take your comments personally. I think these little quotes only highlight your immaturity.

    You seem to be implying in the quote above that you slow down a bit for all pedestrian crossings at all times, be it 1mph or to a complete stop. I can't honestly believe that in a hypothetical example where you're driving through a small village (like the one I live in) at 2am that you'll be using your brake pedal in the slightest, just in case someone runs out into the road. What I suspect you do, like many others, is actually drive above the speed limit, as the conditions dictate that the roads are quiet and a chances of hitting a pedestrian are significantly lower.

    I have no need to apologise or admit that I am wrong as I don't believe there is any reason that you can legitimately challenge the bold part of my statement in my last post. It's as simple as that.

    Those comments were directed towards a gentleman who advocated "piling through" pedestrian crossings. I think the comments were entirely accurate and perfectly fair, and in no way ad hominems. (you should look that phrase up I think).

    and yes, at 2am I do still slow down and approach pedestrian crossings with care. I would recommend everyone else does the same. There are often drunk people around at 2am that might be more likely to step out without looking.

    Seeing as you're so proud of your driving, you should think about taking it to the next level and learning a little bit about defensive driving. If you have any questions, feel free to ask my advice. Take on board this bit of free advice as a starting point.
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    (Original post by py0alb)
    Seeing as you're so proud of your driving, you should think about taking it to the next level and learning a little bit about defensive driving. If you have any questions, feel free to ask my advice. Take on board this bit of free advice as a starting point.
    If I did decide to take my driving "to the next level", I wouldn't be tempted to get advice from you (nothing personal, but I know nothing of your suitability or credentials that would qualify you to teach an advanced driving course other than the fact that you've held a licence for ~12 years). I would much rather go to a qualified instructor.
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    (Original post by TomU)
    If I did decide to take my driving "to the next level", I wouldn't be tempted to get advice from you (nothing personal, but I know nothing of your suitability or credentials that would qualify you to teach an advanced driving course other than the fact that you've held a licence for ~12 years). I would much rather go to a qualified instructor.
    No offence taken. I'm happy to say my habit of braking in anticipation when I suspect a hazard ahead saved a girl from getting knocked over this evening, and then 2 hours saved me from being crashed into by an ambulance. Just goes to show that merely anticipating a hazard is not enough: sometimes you have to proactively take preventative measures.
 
 
 
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